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Center-CAPHS


Spiritual Psychology
Master of Science

Introduction
Program Audience
Entry Requirements
Degree Requirements
Program Faculty
Program Recognition
Course Descriptions

INTRODUCTION
The goal of the true spiritual psychologist is to live with purpose and to join with and inspire others to do the same. Since our Western scientific heritage has assigned the mind and body to the realm of the measurable and the spirit to the domain of faith, there has been a split in our understanding and approach to these essential aspects of the human phenomenon. The advent of holism as a philosophical tenant in the latter part of 20th century heralded a fundamental shift in consciousness, from linear or causal thinking toward systemic awareness. We can no longer operate with a mechanical model if we are to understand the inter-dimensional realities that allow us so much freedom and expansion of our capabilities. It is critical that we have a psychology that not only admits the existence of the human spirit, but also takes it fully into account in knowing and predicting human behavior. Just as important is for us to have spirituality that incorporates the discoveries we have made about the mind/body connection and how the mind and body mirror and manifest our spiritual purpose. To keep the two realms separate is to keep us split and severely limited in our understanding and treatment of the whole human being.

Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.
Program Director

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PROGRAM AUDIENCE
The Spiritual Psychology Program is designed for individuals seeking a professional service career that is spiritually meaningful, as well as for current professionals who want to expand and deepen their traditional skills as a caregiver, educator or administrator. The programs address participants' desire to live a more full life of spirit and have their profession be the ground for ongoing learning, growth and application—such that they are nurtured on all levels by their work.

A principle tenant of Spiritual Psychology is that we cannot truly help others unless we can help ourselves and put our spirit into what we teach. There can be no professional enhancement without personal awareness, and also we cannot grow personally unless we are professionally on purpose and sharing what we have with others responsibly. There is an emphasis in this program on enhancing personal responsibility, and also in participating in a growing community of professionals who are mutually supportive in sharing knowledge and upgrading skills. A unique feature of this course is the involvement of group process through either direct attendance or interactive web learning and listening to the audiotapes of an ongoing group on the learning journey. Opportunities for direct contact with other distance students in the process will be made available.

Additionally, students may elect a Licensure and Certification Track for those seeking credentialing for professional practice. This program has since 1980 served psychologists, social workers, counselors, ministers, physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, nurses, chiropractors, osteopaths, teachers, lay healers and leaders in business and administration. Each one has come away with a deeper certitude of who they are and what they have to offer to their profession and their world.

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
As prerequisites for acceptance to the Master's degree, applicants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized baccalaureate degree in an appropriate field of study and have several years of meaningful professional experience. .A telephone interview with the program director may be required.

The Bachelor’s degree requirement is never waived. However, on occasion well qualified applicants are accepted to the Master's program lacking elements of preparation. Under these conditions, participants would be required to add the missing competencies to their program. Applicants are expected to be proficient in collegiate English language skills. Second language English applicants should submit records of TOEFL examination with scores of 550 minimum. Applicants are expected to have access to a computer, email and the Internet and other outside library resources for the full extent of their program.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Participants in the Master of Science program in Spiritual Psychology complete a minimum of 40 credits above the baccalaureate degree, including the thesis and summary reviews. The coursework requirements include the core elements of the academic major, a major concentration within the major field and research preparation coursework.

Participants also complete a comprehensive examination at the conclusion of the academic coursework, prepare a formal thesis proposal, complete the thesis project, and prepare the manuscript for physical and oral review by faculty.

Core Elements of Academic Major (Required: 18 credits minimum)
Major Concentration (Required: 9 credits minimum)
Research Preparation (Required: 3 credits minimum)
Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)
Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)
Thesis (Required: 4 credits)
Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

Core Elements of the Academic Major
Participants complete core elements of the academic major comprised of 18 credits of mandated studies, as outlined below:

Required: 18 credits selected from among the following courses:
SPY 501: Psychology of the Creative Spiritual Life (3 credits)
SPY 502: Bio-Spiritual Energetics in Human Growth and Development (3 credits)
SPY 503: Systemic Approaches to Core integration (3 credits)
SPY 520: Integrating Spiritual Leadership Skills (3 credits)  
SPY 521: Transformational Psychology (3 credits)
SPY 522: Living Your Purpose (3 credits)
SPY 523: Sacred Traditions (3 credits)

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Major Concentrations (Required: 9 credits minimum)
Participants complete a major concentration comprised of nine credits of specialized studies selected from one the following concentrations:

Therapeutic Breathwork
Holistic Counseling
Shamanistic Studies
Transformations in the Workplace

Therapeutic Breathwork (Required: 9 credits)

Required:The following two courses:
SPY 524: Practicum in Breathwork (3 credits)  
SPY 551: Specialized Intensives in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
PLUS: One of the following courses:
SPY 552: Externship in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
SPY 761: Selected Topics in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
  SPY 762: Advanced Readings in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 763: Special Training in the Field of Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 764: Special Projects in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)

Holistic Counseling (Required: 9 credits)

Required:The following two courses:
SPY 525: Group Facilitator Training (3 credits)
SPY 526: Holistic Counseling (3 credits)
PLUS: One of the following courses:
SPY 552: Externship in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
SPY 761: Selected Topics in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 762: Advanced Readings in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 763: Special Training in the Field of Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 764: Special Projects in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)

Shamanistic Studies (Required: 9 credits)

Required:The following two courses:
SPY 530: Developing a Personal Shamanistic Practice: Survey of global shamanistic methods (3 credits)  
SPY 531: Advanced Shamanistic Studies (3 credits) 
PLUS: One of the following courses:
SPY 552: Externship in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits) 
SPY 761: Selected Topics in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 762: Advanced Readings in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 763: Special Training in the Field of Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 764: Special Projects in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)

Transformations in the Workplace (Required: 9 credits)

Required:The following two courses:
SPY 540: Transformations in the Workplace (3 credits)  
SPY 541: Systems Theory and Management (3 credits) 
PLUS: One of the following courses:
SPY 552: Externship in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits) 
SPY 761: Selected Topics in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 762: Advanced Readings in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 763: Special Training in the Field of Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)  
SPY 764: Special Projects in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)

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Research Preparation
Master's students must pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their final projects (thesis). At least three semester credits of research preparation coursework is required and this might focus upon quantitative and qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques including subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each student’s proposed project.

Through this requirement, students learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study. They should learn to present an effective scholarly review of the academic literature and implement quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating academic issues.

Required:
RES 500: Survey of Research Methods (3 credits)
RES 501: Basic Research Statistics (3 credits)
RES 502: Intermediate Research Statistics (3 credits)
RES 505: Qualitative Research Methods (3 credits)
RES 653 Transpersonal Research (3 credits)
RES 699: Research in Complementary Medicine (3 credits)
OR: Another research preparation course selected with guidance of the senior faculty.

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Comprehensive Examination
Once you have completed the coursework elements of your degree, you will be asked to schedule the Comprehensive Examination. Your primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

Required:
EXM 880: Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)

Thesis Proposal
You are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to your concept for research under the direction of your primary mentor and according to University expectations. At a minimum, your research proposal should clarify the thesis statement and methodology (including the data gathering instruments and data analysis techniques) and provide an effective overview of the scholarly literature that sets the foundation for the thesis. Your research proposal should also include a brief manuscript outline that demonstrates how you will present in written form the various elements of the research project.

Required:
RES 885: Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)

Thesis Project
Following approval of your thesis proposal, you will begin your research project. Your thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is chosen, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be your original work and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement to the professional field.

Your thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of your thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If your thesis takes the form of a scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

Required:
RES 890: Thesis Project(Required: 4 credits)

Oral Review of Thesis
Once you have prepared the thesis manuscript, you will be asked to schedule the formal review process. Your primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area will conduct both the formal physical review of the thesis manuscript and the oral review of thesis.

The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to your underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and your presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The Oral Review of Thesis is conducted under the direction of your primary mentor with the assistance of one qualified member of the faculty. The examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of your thesis. The faculty reviewers explore with you issues related to your thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the thesis review process is a set of final expectations directing you through the remaining tasks for completing the thesis manuscript. Once your final manuscript is approved, you will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later ship the bound thesis to the University for permanent archival storage.

Required:
EXM 895: Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

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PROGRAM FACULTY

Jim Morningstar, Ph.D., Program Director
Dr. Morningstar is the founder and director of the School of Spiritual Psychology, and has been a recognized leader in the breathwork movement. After completing his doctorate in clinical psychology at Fordham University in 1972, he served as a staff psychologist and the administrator of a community mental health center. After traveling in Africa in the 1970s, he began a deep search for his own spiritual path, doing extensive personal growth work in Gestalt, bioenergetics and tai chi, living in a spiritual community, engaging in enlightenment intensives, and conducting research on levels of consciousness. Jim's books have been translated into other languages, and he presents workshops and seminars in the United States and abroad. Dr. Morningstar has authored three books and one audiotape in the fields of spiritual psychology and breathwork.

Daniel L. Huber, Ph.D.
Dan Huber grew up on the shores of Lake Michigan in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Heavily influenced by the beauty of nature around him and the communal interest in helping others, inspired by his parents, Dan developed and pursued a career in helping people. His career started as a childcare counselor at the Child Guidance Clinic in Boston, where exposure to the brightest minds in psychiatry and psychology in helping children, inspired him to enter further graduate study in psychology. His studies began at Boston University and culminated in degrees in counseling and school psychology and a doctorate in developmental psychology from University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Along with his strong academic interest in learning ways to help others, Dan developed spiritually through meditation and shamanism. He found this to be a much broader view for understanding and helping to improve the human condition. Dan’s current work is focused on using ancient techniques of meditation and Shamanism to improve the lives of others and strengthen communities. This interest is presently being expanded into teaching, researching and infusing scientific psychology with practical spirituality.

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PROGRAM RECOGNITION

National Board of Certified Counselors
National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors

National Board of Certified Counselors
The National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc. and affiliates (NBCC?), an independent not-for-profit credentialing body for counselors, was incorporated in 1982 to establish and monitor a national certification system, to identify those counselors who have voluntarily sought and obtained certification, and to maintain a register of those counselors. NBCC's certification program recognizes counselors who have met predetermined standards in their training, experience, and performance on the National Counselor Examination for Licensure and Certification (NCE), the most portable credentialing examination in counseling. NBCC has over 31,000 certified counselors. These counselors live and work in the US and over 50 countries. Our examinations are used by more than 40 states, the District of Columbia, and Guam to credential counselors on a state level. Transformations Incorporated is approved by the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC Provider #6092) as a provider of continuing education credits.
NBCC Website

National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors
NAADAC is the premier global organization of addiction focused professionals who enhance the health and recovery of individuals, families, and communities. Founded in 1972, NAADAC began with a primary focus on alcohol and drug addiction counselors, and today has expended to include tobacco and gambling addiction prevention and treatment counselors. NAADAC is the only professional membership organization that serves counselors who specialize in addiction treatment. With nearly 14,000 members and 47 state affiliates representing more than 80,000 addiction counselors, we are the nation’s largest network of alcoholism and drug abuse treatment professionals. These experts are working to create healthier families and communities through prevention, intervention and quality treatment. Transformations Incorporated is approved by the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC Provider #425) as a provider of continuing education credits.
NAADAC Website

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SPY 501: Psychology of the Creative Spiritual Life (3 credits)
Students will investigate six major life areas in which psychology and spirituality intersect. Learning will be both didactic and experiential such that students will have both the knowledge base of other theorists and the tools to validate their inner truths. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI each year with Jim Morningstar, Ph.D., November through the following April or completed through distance learning. Distance students will listen to audiotapes of six day long seminars, participate in the exercises, have selected readings, complete a workbook and write reports and a paper. Students electing the Licensing and Certification Track will read an additional required text and complete an annotated bibliography. [Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 502: Bio-Spiritual Energetics in Human Growth and Development (3 credits)
Students will learn to read body energy patterns in themselves and others. Bio-energetic exercises and body typing based on the work of Alexander Lowen, MD, will be practiced and will provide an experiential reframing of the first six years of human development. A different series of exercises will be learned for each of the six body types as well as breathwork techniques to open the body to be a vehicle for one's spiritual expression. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI each year with Jim Morningstar, Ph.D., November through the following April or completed through distance learning. Distance students will listen to audiotapes of eighteen two and one-half hour seminars, participate in exercises via videotape and write a paper. Students on the Licensing and Certification Track will read an additional required text and complete and annotated bibliography. [Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 503: Systemic Approaches to Core integration (3 credits)
Several foundational systems approaches presenting holistic paradigms for spirit/mind integration will be studied. This will include Family Systems Theory and General Systems Theory as practiced on a personal and organizational level. Students will study their own systems as well as their personal communication patterns. An emotional autobiography will be required of each student in the process of learning healing interventions for the body, mind and spirit segmentation. Daily journaling will be done based upon the topics studied. Relevance to creating a viable spiritual community in one's world will be emphasized. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI each year, November through the following April or completed through distance learning. Distance students will listen to class tapes, participate in exercises, complete their motional autobiography and write a final paper. Students electing the licensing and Certification Track will read an additional required text and complete an annotated bibliography. [Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 520: Integrating Spiritual Leadership Skills (3 credits)
Students will have the opportunity to explore, experience, and develop leadership skills related to a more complete expression of Spiritual Leadership in their lives. Areas to be addressed are accountability regarding finances and agreements with self and others; responsible and effective communication skills; addictive and negative patterns that compromise living on purpose; boundaries versus barriers; reinforcing and deepening a sense of purpose; developing and implementing a daily spiritual practice to ground and sustain spiritual leadership. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI each year with Cathy Gawlik, M.S. and Dawn Zak, B.S.W., CADC III October through May or completed through distance learning. Distance students will listen to class audiotapes, participate in interactive exercises, turn in written forms, and write a summary of the work. [Instructor: to be assigned]

SPY 521: Transformational Psychology (3 credits)
Beyond an overview of theory this course will provide a variety of learning opportunities and leadership skills for integrating spiritual principles into one's career and everyday life with psychologically grounded techniques. Topics will include dream mastery, creating a statement of purpose and a yearly holistic life plan, Gestalt leadership in life groups, reinforcing daily spiritual practice and preparing an hour-long public presentation. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI each year with Jim Morningstar, Ph.D. October through the following April or completed through distance learning. Distance students will listen to class audiotapes, participate in exercises, turn in written forms, and prepare a presentation to be given in their community and write a summary of their work. [Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 522: Living Your Purpose (3 credits)
Application of spiritual principles in ones chosen life work is the theme of this course. Inner work will include the clearing and strengthening of one's energy centers as a regular practice. Outer work will entail the presentation and analysis of ones career autobiography and the completion of a major project relevant to manifesting purpose in life work that may be the counseling of others in their career paths if so chosen. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI with Jim Morningstar, Ph.D. or via distance learning. Distance students will listen to tapes, engage in the practices, and complete a career autobiography and major project. [Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 523: Sacred Traditions (3 credits)
The major mystery schools of our planet and their practices will be studied experienced and made relevant to contemporary spiritual psychology. The course will involve a systematic exploration of spiritual tradition and self-healing practices from a variety of social and cultural settings with an emphasis on the Enneagram. Chakra balancing techniques will be practiced and workbook completion will be required as well as specified readings. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI each year with Donna Thome, ACSW, current President of the Enneagram Teachers Association in the Oral Tradition or through distance learning. Distance students will complete the workbook and audio/video tape reports of required exercises and a paper on the readings and materials. [Instructor: to be assigned]

SPY 524: Practicum in Breathwork (3 credits)
The theory and practice of breathwork will be presented along with readings and techniques for integrating the practices into ones life and profession. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI each year with Jim Morningstar, Ph.D. November through the following April or via distance learning. Distance students will listen to the class tapes, engage in the exercises and write a paper. Completion of the requirements for trainees in this course leads to certification as a Level I Entry Level Breathworker. [Faculty: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 525: Group Facilitator Training (3 credits)
Learning how to facilitate group energy to bring out the best in each participant, create a spiritual focus and accomplish group goals is the focus for this class. Students will study group process from a variety of theorists including making contracts and effective contact, boundary setting, handling challenges and coming to completion. In addition members will construct a group relevant to their skills and interests that they will prepare to present in their community if they choose. This course maybe taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI with Jim Morningstar, Ph.D. January through April (odd numbered years) or completed through distance learning. Distance students will listen to tapes of six seminars, participate in exercises including the construction of a group that they will present and on which they will report or write a brief paper on group facilitation. [Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 526: Holistic Counseling (3 credits)
Integrating holistic principles into counseling will involve applying the theory and skills learned in prior courses to the consulting room. In addition topics addressed are ethics, diagnosis, institutional vs. private practice, credentialing, levels of consciousness as well as spiritual and religious issues and an overview of holistic techniques. This course may be taken through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI with Jim Morningstar, Ph.D. January through April or completed through distance learning. Distance students will listen to tapes of six seminars, participate in exercises and write a paper in the area of their interest. [Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 551: Specialized Intensives in Spiritual Psychology (4 credits)
The goal of these intensive experiences is to make breakthroughs in the students' spiritual/psychological awareness, self-realization and ability to communicate effectively and wholly to others. Seven days of intensive (all day) workshop experience are required and maybe divided into two or three different intensives (minimum intensive length 2 days). The focus of these experiences is to expand and deepen one's spiritual/emotional/psychological framework both intellectually and experientially, ultimately promoting well being, centeredness and effectiveness even though there may be interim unsettledness. Three intensives offered through the School of Spiritual Psychology in Milwaukee, WI by Jim Morningstar, Ph.D. that meet these criteria are the Enlightenment Intensive (2 days in Feb., even numbered years), the Aliveness Intensive (2 days in Feb., odd number of years) and the Breathwork Intensive (3 days twice per year May and October). Comparable intensive experiences may qualify upon faculty approval. A written report will be required for each intensive detailing the process, conclusions and applications. Students are expected to be in contact with the subject matter for a minimum of 200 hours. [Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

SPY 552: Externship in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
The goal of the field study is investigate core aspects of spiritual psychology within the professional environment through close contact with practitioners and "real world" situations. Students pursue the externship under the direction of program faculty and an approved field site sponsor. Student participation should cover a minimum of 250-300 hours of contact with the subject matter. The field placement is expected to afford students appropriate practical hands-on experience and in-depth knowledge of their professions. Students complete a daily journal and prepare a scholarly paper summarizing their findings for the field study. Balance of clinical expertise and personal incorporation is sought. This externship is supervised by SSP faculty and may be taken on-site or at a sanctioned affiliate program of the SSP. Examples of spiritual-psychological specialties are: Breathwork (Level III Breathwork Practitioner status) bioenergetics, Enneagram, shamanistic studies, mystical traditions and other recognized spiritual healing approaches. Instructor: Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.]

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SPY 761: Selected Topics in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides students with opportunities for directed study in advanced aspects of spiritual psychology under the mentorship of qualified faculty. Students pursue selected advanced readings in spiritual psychology (as assigned by faculty), conduct a library search of the existing literature in a defined area, conduct field observations on this topic and prepare a reflective paper under the direction of the course instructor. The goal of this course is to open for closer student inspection a selected and defined area of Spiritual Psychology. Suggested course emphases include holistic counseling, breathwork, bioenergetics, Enneagram, shamanistic training, mystical traditions. This course may be repeated provided scholarly topics are non duplicative. [Instructor: to be assigned]

 SPY 762: Advanced Readings in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides students with opportunities for directed study covering advanced aspects of spiritual psychology. All psychological schools eventually must confront the fundamental question of the nature of the self. Jnana Yoga is the ancient system of insight that promises liberation through this very process. It has been expressed most vividly in the last century by the Indian sage Ramana Marharshi and the philosopher Krisnamurti. Recently Eckhart Tolle has presented these essential ideas in his entirely modern book, "The Power of Now." This course will examine these writings as a means of investigating the nature of consciousness and the path to freedom from the mind. The study and practice of Jnana Yoga can be investigated in depth or compared to another approach of one's own choosing (e.g., breathwork, bioenergetics, Enneagram, shamanism). [Instructor: to be assigned]

SPY 763: Special Training in the Field of Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
Students pursue special "outside" training in spiritual psychology under the supervision of qualified faculty and training sponsors, as appropriate. This course is intended to allow students to add in a significant manner to their advanced knowledge in spiritual psychology through hands on training under the leadership of qualified individuals and organizations. Students begin the course with the preparation of a brief training proposal and identification of selective readings in support of the approved training. Training projects result in the attainment of a completion certificate or letter of affidavit from the trainer or training organization. Training may take the form of an on-the-job training, on-site internship, an apprenticeship or other formal or semi-formal training activity including professionally presented seminars, conferences, workshops, symposia and retreats. This course may be repeated provided the scholarly topics are non duplicative. [Instructor: to be assigned]

SPY 764: Special Projects in Spiritual Psychology (3 credits)
In collaboration with qualified faculty, students pursue selected readings in study of Spiritual Psychology and then prepare a brief project proposal. This course is intended to allow students to add in a significant manner to the body of knowledge in study of Spiritual Psychology through research, field investigations and explorations of real world situations. Projects result in creating of a unique original work by the student which might take the form of a videotape, audiotape, CD, creative artwork, performing arts, printed materials, or a scholarly paper by direction of course instructor. It may also take the form of an organizing project through which the student establishes a program, project, business or community based organization in the local community, abroad or globally. This course may be repeated provided scholarly topics are non duplicative. [Instructor: to be assigned]

EXM 880: Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)
Once you have completed the coursework elements of your degree, you will be asked to schedule the Comprehensive Examination. Your primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

RES 885: Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)
You are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to your concept for research under the direction of your primary mentor and according to University expectations. At a minimum, your research proposal should clarify the thesis statement and methodology (including the data gathering instruments and data analysis techniques) and provide an effective overview of the scholarly literature that sets the foundation for the thesis. Your research proposal should also include a brief manuscript outline that demonstrates how you will present in written form the various elements of the research project.

RES 890: Thesis Project (Required: 4 credits)
Following approval of your thesis proposal, you will begin your research project. Your thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is chosen, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be your original work and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement to the professional field. Your thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of your thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If your thesis takes the form of a scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

EXM 895: Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)
The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to your underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and your presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations. The Oral Review of Thesis is conducted under the direction of your primary mentor with the assistance of one qualified member of the faculty. The examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of your thesis. The faculty reviewers explore with you issues related to your thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

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Applied Psychology
Integrative Psychology
Business Administration
Engineering and Technology
Economic Development
Environmental Studies
Applied Ecopsychology
Educational Leadership
TESOL Literacy
Public Health Administration
Complementary and Alternative Medicine -CAM
Sustainability Studies
Peace, Diplomacy, and International Relations
Transpersonal Psychology
Professional Studies
University Center
Degree Programs
Honoris Causa Program
Community and Continuing Education

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Akamai University is internationally accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC). The University has earned Premier status with ASIC for its commendable areas of operation. ASIC is an approved accrediting body for the purposes of compliance by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) is a member of the British Quality Foundation (BQF), sits on the Quality Standards Group of UK NARIC, and is one of a number of international accrediting bodies listed in the international directory by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) in the USA and is a member of the CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG).

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