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Center-CAPHS

MEN'S STUDIES AND FATHERHOOD PROGRAM

Introduction
Program Audience
Entry Requirements
Degree Requirements
Primary Faculty
Course Descriptions
Men's and Father's Organizations
Other Men's Links Online
Gender Studies Main Page

The information necessary to create a male is encoded in our DNA, but it takes all the institution of a culture to produce a man. The male body is the biologically given "hardware," the myth of manhood is the "software" inserted by society through a series of formal and informal rites of passage. - - - Sandor McNab

The Women's Movement, the Peace Movement, and the Industrial Revolution, all have made sweeping cultural changes that have gravely affected the lives of men, generally redefining "male" identity. Some men have welcomed these changes and made the adjustment. Others have actively resisted the forces intent upon redefining them. In the wake of this cultural evolution, many men find themselves lost and confused, angry and alienated. Most of the changes have come about so rapidly that orderly social adjustment has been impossible. Cultures forced to abandon a tradition must replace it with a new tradition of equal value, or find expression of such loss in violent substitutes. It is not surprising then, at a time when many men experience a loss of power, identity, self-worth and purpose, that we are witnessing an upsurge of crime, addiction, divorce, and chronic illness. Proactive solutions are few, in part, because men are under organized, confused about what is happening, uninformed about their rights and their situation, or just resistant to change. Even major men's organizations established to effect change, such as, Promise Keepers, The national Organization for Men Against Sexism, and New Warriors, receive little ongoing attention from the media, and have been ineffective at rallying many constituencies of the wider society.

The Men's Studies Program is designed to investigate, in a gender-specific manner, the many forces and issues affecting men in today's society. The mission of the program is to prepare and empower graduates to make far-reaching contributions in a variety of professional settings. The program will explore the spiritual, cultural, social, familial, tonic, political, economic, historical, philosophical, medical and psychological aspects of "being male" in modern society. This program will undertake to fill the knowledge gap in these areas by engaging students through course work, research, fieldwork, and self-examination. We will strive to empower our students with the knowledge and capabilities needed to effectively manage the resulting changes in men's roles and responsibilities. This program will help develop leaders and mentors who can work effectively and responsibly within the diversity of the men's movement, affecting social policy, and building a broader base of knowledge for the study and research of both genders.

The program is designed to serve the professional needs of social and political advocates, public and private policy makers, educators, therapists, personnel directors, ministers, human right's advocates and EAP counselors. This program focuses on the spiritual, cultural, social, familial, ethnic, political, economic, historical, philosophical, medical and psychological aspects of "being male" in our modern society. Our aim is to develop leaders and mentors who can work effectively and responsibly within the diversity of the men's movement, affecting social policy, and building a broader base of knowledge for the study and research of both genders.

Studies include male psychology, men's and father's rights, masculine spirituality, models and roles of masculinity, contemporary issues facing men, early childhood development, new roles for fathers, the modern family, gender and power, the challenge of marriage, issues in men's physical health, gender and politics, ancient and modern rites of passage, life stages, Jung's contributions to male psychology, family violence, men in literature, war and trauma, the men's movement, new models of male leadership, and issues in male sexuality. In addition, students will be engaged in a local Practicum that brings together learning with action, research with practice.

Regards,
John L. Laughlin, Ph.D.

PROGRAM AUDIENCE
The Men's Studies Program seeks participants from policy and lobbying organizations, human rights organizations, social services, environmental and consumer groups, business and industry, governmental and nonprofit sectors, research centers, unions and trade associations, think tanks, and advocacy groups, communications, education, law enforcement, corrections, employee training, international rights, ministry, reproductive rights, research, health care, counseling and the helping professions.

This program undertakes to fill the knowledge gap in these areas by engaging students through course work, research, fieldwork, and self-examination. Through its Men's Studies and Fatherhood Program, Akamai empowers its students with the knowledge and capabilities needed to effectively manage the resulting changes in men's roles and responsibilities. Akamai's Men's Studies and Fatherhood Program is committed to developing leaders and mentors who can work effectively and responsibly within the diversity of the men's movement, affecting social policy, and building a broader base of knowledge for the study and research of both genders.

Studies include male psychology, men's and father's rights, masculine spirituality, models and roles of masculinity, contemporary issues facing men, early childhood development, new roles for fathers, the modern family, gender and power, the challenge of marriage, issues in men's physical health, gender and politics, ancient and modern rites of passage, life stages, Jung's contributions to male psychology, family violence, men in literature, war and trauma, the men's movement, new models of male leadership, and issues in male sexuality. In addition, students will be engaged in a local Practicum that brings together learning with action, research with practice.

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
As prerequisites for acceptance to the Master's degree, applicants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized baccalaureate degree in an appropriate field of study and have several years of meaningful professional experience. .A telephone interview with the program director may be required.

Applicants are expected to be proficient in collegiate English language skills. Second language English applicants should submit records of TOEFL examination with scores of 550 minimum. Applicants are expected to have access to a computer, email and the Internet and other outside library resources for the full extent of their program.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Participants in the Master of Science Program in Men's Studies and Fatherhood complete a minimum of 40 credits above the baccalaureate degree, including the thesis and summary reviews. The coursework requirements include the core elements of the academic major, a major concentration within the major field and research preparation coursework.

Participants also complete a comprehensive examination at the conclusion of the academic coursework, prepare a formal thesis proposal, complete the thesis project, and prepare the manuscript for physical and oral review by faculty.

Core Elements of Academic Major (Required: 18 credits minimum)
Major Concentration (Required: 9 credits minimum)
Research Preparation (Required: 3 credits minimum)
Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)
Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)
Thesis (Required: 4 credits)
Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

Core Elements of the Academic Major
Participants complete core elements of the academic major comprising 18 credits of mandated studies, as outlined below:

Required: The following nine credits:

MSP 531: Rites of Passage: Ancient and Modern (3 credits)
MSP 532: Developmental Male Psychology (3 credits)
MSP 533: Issues in Male Sexuality (3 credits)

Plus nine additional credits selected from the following courses:

MSP 534: Men in Literature (3 credits)
MSP 535: Issues Facing Men (3 credits)
MSP 536: Models of Masculinity (3 credits)
MSP 537: Marriage and Fatherhood (3 credits)
MSP 538: Male Victimization (3 credits)
MPS 539: Male Archetypes (3 credits)
MSP 540: Men's/Fathers' Rights (3 credits)
MSP 541: Patriarchy (3 credits)
MSP 542: Male Spirituality(3 credits)

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Major Concentrations (Required: 9 credits minimum)
Participants complete a major concentration comprised of nine credits of specialized studies in a student-selected focus of men's studies and fatherhood. This specialized area of study in explored in detail by advanced readings and field study:

MSP 500: Advanced Readings in Men’s Studies and Fatherhood
MSP 599: Field Studies in Men’s Studies and Fatherhood
PLUS: one additional course selected from the core electives

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Research Preparation
Master's students must pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their final projects (thesis). At least three semester credits of research preparation coursework is required and this might focus upon quantitative and qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques including subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each student’s proposed project.

Through this requirement, students learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study. They should learn to present an effective scholarly review of the academic literature and implement quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating academic issues.

Required: Minimum three credits, selected from among the following:
RES 500: Survey of Research Methods (3 credits)
RES 501: Basic Research Statistics (3 credits)
RES 502: Intermediate Research Statistics (3 credits)
RES 505: Qualitative Research Methods (3 credits)
RES 653 Transpersonal Research (3 credits)
RES 699: Research in Complementary Medicine (3 credits)
OR: Another research preparation course selected with guidance of the senior faculty.

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Comprehensive Examination
Once you have completed the coursework elements of your degree, you will be asked to schedule the Comprehensive Examination. Your primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

Required:
EXM 880: Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)

Thesis Proposal
You are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to your concept for research under the direction of your primary mentor and according to University expectations. At a minimum, your research proposal should clarify the thesis statement and methodology (including the data gathering instruments and data analysis techniques) and provide an effective overview of the scholarly literature that sets the foundation for the thesis. Your research proposal should also include a brief manuscript outline that demonstrates how you will present in written form the various elements of the research project.

Required:
RES 885: Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)

Thesis Project
Following approval of your thesis proposal, you will begin your research project. Your thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is chosen, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be your original work and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement to the professional field.

Your thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of your thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If your thesis takes the form of a scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

Required:
RES 890: Thesis Project(Required: 4 credits)

Oral Review of Thesis
Once you have prepared the thesis manuscript, you will be asked to schedule the formal review process. Your primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area will conduct both the formal physical review of the thesis manuscript and the oral review of thesis.

The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to your underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and your presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The Oral Review of Thesis is conducted under the direction of your primary mentor with the assistance of one qualified member of the faculty. The examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of your thesis. The faculty reviewers explore with you issues related to your thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the thesis review process is a set of final expectations directing you through the remaining tasks for completing the thesis manuscript. Once your final manuscript is approved, you will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later ship the bound thesis to the University for permanent archival storage.

Required:
EXM 895: Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

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PRIMARY FACULTY

Faculty Biographies

Daniel L. Huber, Ph.D.
Men's Studies and Fatherhood

John L. Laughlin, Ph.D.
Men's Studies and Fatherhood

Stanley Krippner, Ph.D.
Human Sexuality

Lisa Mertz, Ph.D.
Cross-cultural Women's Studies

Peggy A. Thayer, Ph.D.
Cross-cultural Gender Studies

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MSP 531: Rites of Passage: Ancient and Modern (3 credits)
This course focuses on the rights of passage from boyhood to manhood as seen in Native or Contemporary societies. Students may choose, for example, three Native or Ancient cultures and present a paper on: the difference and similarity in the ritualization from boyhood to manhood; symbols and ceremonies used; tasks required for this transition to be successful. Students can examine this issue in our modern culture for the view: of its rituals and ceremonies; their effectiveness and failures in assisting boys become men; the role of fathers in the process; the place of men's groups in introducing new rites of passage; how rites of passage tie into the broader issue of alienation community.

MSP 532: Developmental Male Psychology (3 credits)
All humans are born with a biological identity and socialized into different roles and genders. How is male gender defined? How do we come to adopt ways of being male? This course examines these and other issues throughout the stages in a man's life. To succeed each phase, one must complete definable tasks. Incomplete tasks influence the developing male psyche as much as completed one. Other issues that can be explored are:1)the validity of Robert Bly's "naive male," 2) the place of Jung's concepts of "Anima" and "Shadow," in male development, and 3) the issue of "father wounding." A journal should be kept of insights gained by the student while applying this knowledge to his own life. A major paper is required that shows the student's grasp of the major theories of developmental psychology.

MSP 533: Issues in Male Sexuality (3 credits)
In this course one can explore a number of areas that affect and shape men's sexual experiences such as sex and marriage, the connection between sex and violence, sex crimes, the physical aspects of sex, sex therapy, homophobia, homosexuality, addictions, incest, male friendships, sexuality and spirituality, sexual dreams, the archetypes of phalos and lover, and the mother-son relationship. Students may write a paper on an area they select for deeper study.

MSP 534: Men in Literature (3 credits)
This course examines the role of literature and journalism in shaping the lives of men over the last three centuries. Students can focus on the literature of a period of time, a culture or race, a single author, a particular genre, or a specific issue they wish to explore through fiction or journalism. How are men represented in the literature of different times, through the eyes of different writers of different sexual orientation or different races? Is there a masculist literature to compare with feminist literature? Students will submit a scholarly paper on the area they select for study.

MSP 535: Issues Facing Men (3 credits)
In today's rapidly changing world men are confronted with similar and also different issues, and even the same issued are often filtered through a male or female perspective. This course allows students the opportunity to explore one or more crucial issues facing men today or in the foreseeable future. Some of these issues include career choices, work setting, success vs. fulfillment, parenting responsibilities, sexism and agism, relationships and spiritual fulfillment. There are many others to choose from. The student will do an in-depth study of one or more of these issues and prepare a in depth report.

MSP 536: Models of Masculinity (3 credits)
There are many models of masculinity with machismo, the rugged individualist, among the oldest. This style of masculinity is still highly visible in North American society. Students might examine the historical and sociological roots of this male subculture and preoccupation. How is this image threatened by change and what will be the consequence of such change? Do cultural icons like John Wayne, Rambo, Dirty Harry and Indiana Jones offer models of heroism at the price of isolation? Their message and lifestyle often contain a deep and secret woundedness that drives them into suicidal risks, an emotionally transient lifestyle, and violence. What is the impact on men trying and succeeding or failing in following their idea of "hero?" Students may suggest other male models to explore.

MSP 537: Marriage and Fatherhood (3 credits)
This course examines the many issues confronting men as fathers and spouses. Students can select an area for in-depth study such as the issue of disappearing fathers, father wound, new roles of fathers, divorce, blended families, custody, welfare reform, fathers and daughters or sons, fathers and their father or mother, and the impact of these on children.

MSP 538: Male Victimization (3 credits)
This course will focus on the types of abuse faced by males as children, adolescents and adults. It will examine the role of gender in the cycle of abuse and include an overview of Post-traumatic stress disorder and its treatment, the affects of emotional, sexual and physical abuse. One can focus on the assessment and treatment research in the area of male victimization, or the psychological treatment of sexual perpetrators (including clergy), adult survivors of abuse and rape. One may also write an in-depth report on a visited treatment site.

MPS 539: Male Archetypes (3 credits)
Jung's concept of archetype is synonymous with "primary imprint," patterned responses in ways of thinking and feeling that occur in all cultures, under all conditions. This course examines the recent formulations of male archetypal psychology. Four archetypes are examined in detail as they manifest over time from boyhood to manhood in their positive and negative aspects: King/Shadow King, Warrior/Black Knight, Magician/Evil Sorcerer, Lover/Addict. These are further applied to the student's life as he has come to understand them for reading and journaling. A final paper should explore how these archetypes are affected by one or more of the following: the absent of one or more parent, sexual-physical-emotional abuse, the lack of initiation rituals, patriarchy, feminism, and the men's movement.

MSP 540: Men's/Fathers' Rights (3 credits)
There are nearly 300 men's groups, divided broadly by their main focus. Fathers' rights groups are involved in such things as child custody, child support awards, rights of unmarried fathers and abortion issues, and false memory syndrome. Men's rights advocates fight against male-only draft laws, false accusations of rape, rape of men in institutions, differences in federal funding research for breast vs. prostrate cancer, more lenient judicial rulings for female defendants. This course in an introduction to the history of such organizations and the weight of their claims. Students can explore the topic narrowly and focus on one organization or issue or more widely on the issue of men's rights and summarize their research and conclusions in a paper.

MSP 541: Patriarchy (3 credits)
Much that is said and written against men is rooted in a social system of male domination called patriarchy. Today we are leaning to differentiate patriarchy from masculinity, a non-hierarchical term free of the oppressive connotation of the former. Still, patriarchy is firmly in place in major institutions such as the church and politics. This course examines the history and development of patriarchy. How is patriarchy being challenged by men and women and who are its proponents. What models are likely to replace it and what will be the consequences? How do patriarchy and matriarchy compare? Students can examine this topic from a sociological or anthropological view.

MSP 542: Male Spirituality (3 credits)
One may examine our Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian heritage; the role of organized religion in men?s lives; tension between predominant male leadership in organized religion and the larger participation by women; the need for new symbols and metaphors; the modern equivalent of the hero's journey; the impact of male spiritual organizations such as Promise Keepers; feminist theologies' challenge to patriarchal religion; addictions as spiritual alternatives; the connection between male sexuality and spirituality; the role of spirituality in healing male wounds and the influence of Native American spirituality on the Mythopoetic men?s movement.

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MEN'S AND FATHER'S ORGANIZATIONS

The Men's Bibliography
The Manhood Line
In Search of Fatherhood? BSI International
Human Kindness Foundation
Rich Zubaty's Website on the Men's Movement

The Men's Bibliography
The Men's Bibliography is a comprehensive and up-to-date bibliography of writing on men, masculinities, gender, and sexualities. The Men?s Bibliography lists over fifteen-thousand books and articles, sorted into over thirty major subject areas. Compiled by Michael Flood. First published in 1992. Updated 30 May 2003. Now in its 11th Edition.
Bibliography Website
Bibliography Email

The Manhood Line(TM)
The Manhood Line is a syndicated, monthly column, written for men from a biblical, business, and common-sense perspective. It reaches readers around the world on many Internet sites.
Publication Website
Publication Email

IN SEARCH OF FATHERHOOD, BSI International
IN SEARCH OF FATHERHOOD Forum is or and about the fathers of the world. IN SEARCH OF FATHERHOOD is exclusively published and nationally distributed on a subscriber basis by BSI International. It offers men who are fathers from all walks of life an "uncut" and "uncensored" environment within which to freely express and exchange ideas and views about issues directly or indirectly related to parenting from a male perspective. Issues include raising children, health, divorce, visitation rights, custody rights, and career and employment.
BSI Website
In Search of Fatherhood Forum
BSI Email

Human Kindness Foundation
The Human Kindness Foundation, founded by Bo and Sita Lozoff, is a non-profit organization which stresses a way of life based upon three common principles taught by the great sages of all religions: Simple living, a dedication to service, and a commitment to personal spiritual practice. Besides its internationally respected Prison-Ashram Project, the Foundation sponsors a spiritual community and visitor's center called Kindness House, plus Bo Lozoff's free talks and workshops. Since 1973, Bo has spoken in hundreds of prisons, hospitals, churches, universities and spiritual centers around the globe. Bo also contributes the lead article for the free newsletter, "A Little Good News," which is sent three times per year to approximately 30,000 readers.
Foundation Webpage
Human Kindness Foundation
PO Box 61619
Durham, NC 27715 USA
Tel:(919) 304-2220
Fax: (919) 304-3220
Please call between the hours of 9:30 AM and 5:00 PM USA Eastern Time.

Rich Zubaty's Website on the Men's Movement
Rich Zubaty's website links the men's movement internationally. "Men are good, corporations are bad." Read all about it on the Rich Zubaty Website. Books and oil paintings depicting the political, economic, and spiritual stresses plaguing modern men -- including war, feminism, divorce, downsizing and global corporations -- contrasted with travel adventures describing traditional lifestyles that have endured for thousands of years.
Rich Zubaty's Website
UK Men's Movement Website

MEN'S LINKS ONLINE

Fatherhood Journals and Texts
News and Commentary Websites Additional Fatherhood Organizations
Information and Discussion Forums
Men's Texts and Journals

Fatherhood Journals and Texts

In Search of Fatherhood
A leading journal in support of fatherhood

Fathering: A Journal of Theory, Research, and Practice About Men as Fathers, Men's Studies Press
Peer-reviewed social science journal. Current Editor: Jay Fagan, DSW, Temple University

National Center on Fathers and Families; University of Pennsylvania
Well-organized academic project with online resources including notices, abstracts, and an online journal

IN SEARCH OF FATHERHOOD(R) Forum
Interesting non-academic journal and "conversation" among fathers about fatherhood

News and Commentary Websites

Men's News Daily
Father's Magazine
Fatherville

Fatherhood Organizations

American Coalition for Fathers and Children
The largest shared parenting organization in the US (and perhaps the world), site also contains links to affiliated state organizations as well as like-minded organizations in other countries.

Alliance for Non-Custodial Parent's Rights
An organization that must be getting plenty of attention because links from their site account for a sizable portion of the traffic I get at my project web site.

Children's Rights Council
This group has earned a reputation as a pro-father organization through their philosophy that "The Best Parent is Both Parents" -- i.e. not leaving fathers out. President and co-founder: David Levy

Information and Discussion Forums

DivorceNet
Considered one of the Net's largest divorce resources since 1995

Dad's Divorce
A forum for dads facing divorce

Men's Health Network
An information and educational organization recognizing men's health as a special social concern

Fathers Resource Center
Independent attempt (mostly in California) to establish a resource center for information / education related to fatherhood

Men's Texts and Journals

Gay, Roger F. A Further Look at Child Support Guidelines PS: Political Science and Politics Journal

Braver, Sanford L, O'Connell, Diane, and Tarcher, J. P. (1998) Divorced Dads: Shattering the Myths, Department of Psychology, Arizona State Hardcover, 288 pages ISBN: 0-874-77862-X

Warshak, Richard, The Custody Revolution, Poseidon Press: New York, University of Texas Health Science Center Website

Hoff-Sommers, Christina, Who Stole Feminism?: How Women Have Betrayed Women

Hoff-Sommers, Christina, The WAR AGAINST BOYS: How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Men

Farrel, Warren, The Myth of Male Power

Gardner, Richard. The Parental Alienation Syndrome: A Guide for Mental Health and Legal Professionals

Brams, Steven, and Taylor, Alan. Fair Division: From Cake-Cutting to Dispute Resolution

Brams, Steven, and Taylor, Alan. The Win-Win Solution: Guaranteeing Fair Shares to Everybody

Alston, Margaret, Bowles, Wendy and Brams, Steven J. Research for Social Workers: An Introduction to Methods

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