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Header-Student Tuition


INTEGRAL HEALTH STUDIES

Introduction
Target Audience
Learning Objectives
Bachelor of Health Science
Master of Science
Online Libraries, Journals, Research Databases
Resources and Links for Integral Health Studies
Activity Postings
Program Recognition and Affiliation
Program Faculty
Course Descriptions

The Integral Health Studies Program offers comprehensive interdisciplinary studies of the integral determinants of health and wellness, grounded in Integral Philosophy and broad empirical inquiry, leading to the award of the undergraduate (Bachelor's degree) and/or graduate (Master's degree) in Integral Health Studies. Studies include an applied 'Inner Practicum' requirement and a working knowledge of a range of epistemological/research skills with the aim of greatly enhancing understandings and applied capacities in health service, health education, health research and related professional roles in diverse contexts.

Encompassing conventional, holistic, complementary, alternative, public, ecological, energy, spiritual, mind-body, cultural, and integrative perspectives on health within a coherent, unifying and practical framework (as opposed to "integrative" and "holistic" models which lack cohering explanatory frameworks), Integral Health studies are underpinned by an interdisciplinary developmental meta-model that places importance on the healer's own integral development, epistemological breadth, and capacities to see interrelated movement of the greater whole.

The Integral Health Study Program's meta-theoretical underpinning is grounded in Wilber's AQAL Integral framework. Core competency requirements for the IHS students include completion of CoreIntegral courses 01 and 02 and their comprehensive competency examinations. Program participants are encouraged to interface throughout their studies with the resources of the Integral Institute.

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Target Audience
The Integral Health Studies Program is appropriate for:

  • Current health and helping professionals (e.g. nurses, counselors, massage therapists, social workers)
  • Those considering further graduate (post-graduate) and/or specialist vocational training toward a career in health, healing/helping, or complementary and alternative medical professions
  • Those considering further academic training toward an academic and/or research and development career in health and allied professions
  • Those interested in careers in Integral Health across health and helping professions

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Learning Objectives
The degree award demonstrates competencies in the following areas, the student thus being able to:

  • Identify and articulate a viable integral model that unifies health sciences and their practices into a coherent and optimally functioning endeavor
  • Critically evaluate the multidimensional nature and determinants of health and deviations from health
  • Demonstrate a capacity to evaluate and make decisions based on and using healthcare research and evidenced based knowledge, and the capacity to conceptualize modeling and integration of diverse forms of evidence that contribute to the evidence base in health and allied professions
  • Demonstrate a capacity for self-reflection and integral self-development across domains in self, culture and nature
  • Demonstrate knowledge of subtle anatomy
  • Evidence the reflexivity to enable transformative ("interiors") development capacities across varying contextual and institutional environments
  • Evidence a capacity to communicate effectively in professional writing
  • Demonstrate an understanding of health care trends, developments, and the multidimensional factors impinging on it
  • Demonstrate ethical and professional communication across levels of service, position, and function
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of non-traditional forms of healing, complementary and alternative health systems, their validity claims, epistemologies, and integral development potentials in contemporary healthcare

BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE

The Bachelor of Health Science (BHSc) in Integral Health Studies is a two-year undergraduate degree completion program offered for students seeking careers in health, helping (e.g. behavioral health), and complementary medicine/healing (e.g. energy medicine) professions.

Minimum Entry Requirements
Degree Requirements
Bachelor's Course Descriptions

Minimum Entry Requirements
Admission is open to those with either an Associates degree from an accredited institution or those who that meet the University’s general education requirements in English, Humanities, Basic Mathematic and Sciences, and the Social Sciences. In addition, applicants should have completed at least one 3-credit course relevant to health sciences, such as, Anatomy and Physiology or Foundations of Health, and two 3-credit courses in areas of Psychology and Social Work. Preferred applicants will hold a qualification, certification or registration in a health, healing, helping, or allied profession. Admission is also granted to international student applicants holding a formal and recognized two-year full-time qualification in a health or social services helping field with transcripts that demonstrate a suitable academic background (A-levels in general education and/or health and psychological sciences).

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Degree Requirements
A minimum of 120 semester credits is required for the degree with elements in general education, the core academic major, electives, a senior project and final examination, as defined below:

    General Education Requirements (Required: 30 credits)
    The Core Academic Major (Required: 30 credits)
    IHS 451: Inner Practicum and Transformational Practice (3 credits)
    Electives (as required)
    RES 490: Senior Project (Required: 6 credits)
    EXM 499: Final Examination (Required: 4 credits)

NOTE: To complete a portion of these requirements, students may transfer appropriate coursework completed at outside colleges and training institutions and from college proficiency examinations. Students may apply appropriate college equivalency credits earned through formal portfolio assessment. Relevant elements from your general education coursework may also apply toward the academic major. These core academic competencies emphasize the theories, principles and practices at the foundation of the discipline, and the philosophical and cultural implications of the field. They also incorporate applied elements of the discipline.

General Education (Required: 30 credits minimum)
Students must demonstrate completion of a total of 30 semester credits in general education competencies, including at least six credits in physical sciences and mathematics, the social sciences, and arts and humanities. The general education requirements assure students develop an understanding and appreciation of the social and culture differences and interdependency of the global community, and build an awareness of themselves as spiritual, social, and biological beings.

Physical Sciences and Mathematics
History and Social Sciences
Arts and Humanities

Physical Sciences and Mathematics (Required: 6 credits minimum)
Through this competency, students build an understanding the physical environment. Courses from the following fields help fulfill this requirement: environmental science, health, nutrition and fitness, and other physical and biological sciences, mathematics, algebra, geometry, accounting, personal finance, computer science, statistics, or financial management.

History and Social Sciences (Required: 6 credits minimum)
Through this competency, students build an understanding of human culture. Courses from the following fields help fulfill this requirement: history, government, civilization, political science, human development, economics, business studies, administration, psychology, sociology, education, anthropology and other related subjects.

Arts and Humanities (Required: 6 credits minimum)
Through this competency, students build an understanding of effective communication. Courses from the following fields help fulfill this requirement: language studies, composition, literature, creative writing, music, philosophy, creative arts, performing arts, and other arts and humanities.

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The Core Academic Major
Students must complete a minimum of 30 semester credits of required coursework, as defined below.

Required: the following 30 credits:

    IHS 401: Complementary and Alternative Medicine I (3 credits)
    IHS 402: The Integral Model and Philosophy of Self, Culture, and Nature (3 credits)
    IHS 403: Foundations of Health Psychology (3 credits)
    IHS 404: Modern Health Care Systems (3 credits)
    IHS 408: Positive Psychology and Integral Lifestyle (3 credits)
    IHS 405: Energy Medicine I (3 credits)
    IHS 406: Introduction to Public Health (3 credits)
    IHS 411: Research Methods in Health and Social Sciences (3 credits)
    IHS 414: Integral Psychology (3 credits)
    IHS 420: Integral Health and the Future of Healthcare (3 credits)

Note:In addition, applicants should have completed at least one 3-credit course directly relevant to basic clinical health sciences, such as, Anatomy and Physiology or Human Biology and Pathophysiology, and two 3-credit courses in psychological sciences areas that must include an introductory course in Psychology. If these are lacking as part of the participant's preparation, such must be added as elements of the core for the degree.

Inner Practicum and Transformational Practice
Undergraduate students must investigate core aspects of the discipline within the professional environment through close contact with practitioners and “real world” situations. Students should participate in the field study for a minimum of 150 contact hours. The field placement is expected to afford students appropriate practical hands on experience and in-depth knowledge of their areas of practice. Students complete a daily journal and prepare a scholarly paper summarizing their findings for the field study.

Bachelor’s participants will have a minimum three-credit practicum requirement as an essential element of the degree. Under the supervision of assigned instructors, students will select from a range of personal development, growth, and transformative practices (e.g. meditative/contemplative, art/expressive, interpersonal/psychological, yoga, breathwork, bodywork, cultural expeditions, volunteer/service, combinations of these, etc.) and document their experiences on life domains relevant to health, healing, and wellness. The student can choose to undergo these experiences in retreats, intensives, community services, home practices, social gatherings, external trainings, health and wellness centers, spas.

NOTE: Students may elect to take additional field study elements to a maximum of 9 credits.

    IHS 451: Inner Practicum and Transformational Practice (3 credits)

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Program Electives
Students may select any of the following courses to help complete the minimum 120 credits requirement for the degree:

    IHS 409: Complementary and Alternative Medicine II (3 credits)
    IHS 410: Behavioral Medicine I (3 credits)
    IHS 412: Energy Medicine II (3 credits)
    IHS 413: Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3 credits)
    IHS 408: Positive Psychology and Integral Lifestyle
    IHS 415: Ecological Health (3 credits)
    IHS 416: Energy Medicine III (3 credits)
    IHS 418: Integral Health Education and Promotion (3 credits)
    IHS 419: Integral Ethics and Professional Development (3 credits)
    IHS 421: Naturopathy I (3 credits)
    IHS 422: Naturopathy II (3 credits)
    IHS 423: Homeopathy I (3 credits)
    IHS 424: Homeopathy II (3 credits)
    IHS 425: Homeopathy III (3 credits)
    IHS 426: Herbal Medicine I (3 credits)
    IHS 427: Aromatherapy (3 credits)
    IHS 428: Somatic Healing and Bodywork I (3 credits)
    IHS 429: Somatic Healing and Bodywork II (3 credits)
    IHS 430: Movement and Breathwork I (3 credits)
    IHS 431: Movement and Breathwork II (3 credits)
    IHS 433: Behavioral Medicine II (3 credits)
    IHS 434: Spirituality and Awareness of Cult Dangers (3 credits)
    IHS 435: Noetic Sciences I (3 credits)
    IHS 436: Transpersonal Psychology (3 credits)
    IHS 437: Eastern Healing Traditions I (3 credits)
    IHS 438: Eastern Healing Traditions II (3 credits)
    IHS 439: Advances toward Ecological Health (3 credits)
    IHS 440: Integral Health Care Systems (3 credits)
    IHS 441: Psychopathology (3 credits)
    IHS 442: Medical Terminology (2 credits)
    IHS 443: Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
    IHS 444: Intermediate Statistics (3 credits)
    IHS 445: Anatomy and Physiology (non-lab) (3 credits)
    IHS 447: Intermediate Statistics (3 credits)

Note: Appropriate courses selected from other fields of study may be approved subject upon favorable appraisal by the primary faculty advisor.

RES 499: Senior Project (Required: 6 credits)
The Senior Project is intended to provide the University with a quality review of the student’s academic competencies, which may include proficiency in expressive communication (e.g. writing proficiency, critical and creative thinking). The process includes a brief proposal stage, data gathering and manuscript preparation stage, and a project review stage. Students are provided an opportunity to investigate an area of special interest in their academic concentration, which has potential for advancing some aspect of the field, their own profession development, and the contexts within which these occur.

Examples of legitimate Senior Projects (written form) include critical review papers (15-30 pages, in APA format), theory building/hypothesis development papers (20-30 pages), research proposals/literature review papers (20-30 pages, APA format), or comparative analysis and syntheses papers (15-30 pages). The student’s project should convey a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter, and the ability to effectively express that understanding within inter-subjective context. While most projects may take the form of a standard research project, with the mentor's approval, students may pursue another appropriate format such as an audio- or videotape project, a recorded public performance, a business plan, original work of art, detailed case study or another relevant project.

Senior Project Proposal Before beginning the research of the scholarly literature and data gathering activities and any actual writing of your project manuscript, students prepare and submit a formal proposal for approval. The University provides an approved research proposal format requirements within the online program handbook. Students should be prepared to provide necessary facts and information as needed by the mentor in reviewing the research proposal. Students are also expected to carefully examine the University's manuscript guidelines to conform their documents.

It will prove best for students to begin discussions with their primary mentor concerning the Senior Project topic soon after registration. After sufficient exploration, the expectations of the mentor and the manuscript requirements for the project will become clear. Students should also discuss with their mentor the issues of research protocol related to working with human subjects and the use and care of live animals, if this is to be part of the Senior Project.

Manuscript Outline The student will be guided in the presentation of a master outline for the proposed manuscript. This will help the student more fully develop the proposal package and clarify the structure of the academic argument. The manuscript outline is intended to bring strength to the scholarly discussion, helping the student organize an effective exploration of the subject matter. The student should carefully review the University's written guidelines for manuscript preparation provided in the online program handbook.

Referencing the Literature Students pursuing the alternative Bachelor’s Program may be new to the referencing requirements for major academic papers and should discuss these with the primary mentor before beginning the project.

Manuscript Presentation The Senior Project should closely adhere to the manuscript guideline presented in the University’s online program handbook and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. The manuscript should be prepared and bound in an acceptable manner for permanent archival storage. Spiral and press binding are acceptable.

Senior Project Review Once students have prepared the Senior Project manuscript, they will schedule the formal review process. The primary mentor and the Center Director (or an assigned representative) will conduct both the formal physical review of the manuscript and the oral review of the project.

The physical review of the project manuscript usually takes the review committee two to four weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to the underlying review of the literature, the project methodology, the mechanics of the project, and formal presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The oral review of the project is conducted under the direction of the primary mentor with the assistance of Center Director (or an assigned representative). The examination is carried out by telephone conference call or another synchronous method and is designed to allow detailed investigation of the project. The faculty reviewers explore issues related to the project including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the project review process is a set of final expectations directing the student through the remaining tasks for correcting the project manuscript. Once the final manuscript is approved, the student will arrange suitable binding for the document and later ship the bound project to the University headquarters for permanent archival storage.

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EXM 490: Final Examination (Required: 4 credits)
Once the senior project has been completed, the Final Examination may be scheduled. The final examination will include written and oral elements. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. The students’ answers are expected to draw from the academic competencies of their program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference or an alternative asynchronous method and is intended to allow detailed investigation of the students’ written responses.

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MASTER OF SCIENCE

Minimum Entry Requirements
Degree Requirements
Master's Course Descriptions

Minimum Entry Requirements
As a prerequisite for acceptance to the Master's program in Integral Health Studies, participants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized baccalaureate degree in an appropriate field of study and have several years of meaningful professional experience.

The baccalaureate degree requirement is never waived. However, on occasion well qualified applicants are accepted to the Master's program lacking elements of preparation. Under these conditions, you would be required to add the missing competencies to your program.

You are expected to be proficient in collegiate English language skills. If you are a second language English applicant, you should submit records of TOEFL examination with scores of 550 minimum. You are expected to have access to a computer, email and the Internet and other outside library resources for the full extent of your program.

Master's Degree Requirements
Students in the Master of Science in Integral Health Studies will complete a minimum of 40 credits above the baccalaureate level including a thesis. The coursework requirements include the academic major, the academic minor, research preparation, the thesis project, and additional electives, as needed, to satisfy the minimum credit requirements. The requirements for the academic major, minor and research preparation coursework are defined by the primary mentor assigned to oversee the student’s program.

Master's students complete a comprehensive examination at the conclusion of the academic coursework; they prepare a formal thesis proposal, complete the thesis project, and prepare the manuscript for faculty review. Master's students also complete an oral review of thesis at the conclusion of the physical manuscript review.

Master's Degree Requirements:

Academic Major (Required: 18 credits)
Academic Minor (Required: 9 credits)
Research Preparation (Required: 3 credits)
EXM 880: Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)
RES 885: Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)
RES 890: Thesis Project (Required: 4 credits)
EXM 895: Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

The Academic Major (18 credits)
Master's students in Integral Healthcare complete 18 graduate credits in core coursework comprising an academic major. These are the foundational competencies in theories, principles, and practices, and the historical, philosophical, and social-cultural implications of the discipline. These courses represent the core competencies and essential elements, which define your field of study and establish the underlying foundations upon which you may base your advanced professional development.

Required (the following 18 credits):

  • IHS 502: The Integral Meta-Model (3 credits)
  • CAM 504: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (3 credits)
  • IHS 508: Integral Healthcare and Lifestyle (3 credits)
  • IHS 514: Integral Psychology (3 credits)
  • IHS 551: Inner Practicum and Transformational Practice (3 credits)
  • PLUS: Either of the following two courses:

    CAM 699: Research in Complementary Medicine (3 credits)
    OR
    RES 653: Transpersonal Research (3 credits)

The Academic Minor
Master's students completing the degree by coursework, also complete coursework in an academic minor, comprising at least 9 credits. Master's students completing the degree by coursework, also complete coursework in an academic minor comprising at least 9 credits. Under advisement of the Graduate Committee, the student will complete the minor requirement with a minimum of three electives consisting of at least one course each selected from the following Centers for Center:

Transpersonal Psychology and Consciousness Studies
AND
School of Complementary and Alternative Medicine<
AND
School of Public Health
OR
School of Applied Ecopsychology and Integrated Ecology

Research Preparation
Master's students must pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their final projects (thesis or major project in lieu of thesis). At least three semester credits of research preparation coursework is required and this might focus upon quantitative and qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques, especially subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each student's proposed project. Through this requirement, students learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study. They should learn to present an effective scholarly review of the academic literature and implement quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating academic issues.

Unless otherwise arranged with the senior faculty overseeing the Master's Program, students must complete:

CAM 590 Qualitative Research for Complementary Medicine (3 credits)
OR
CAM 591: Research Basics for Evaluating CAM Therapies (3 credits)
OR
Another research preparation course selected from an appropriate field of study, such as psychology, health, or education.

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Comprehensive Examination
Once the student has completed the coursework elements of the degree, they schedule the Comprehensive Examination. The primary mentor and a faculty member representing the minor field of study conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

Thesis Proposal
Master's students are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to the concept for research under the direction of the primary mentor and following the guidelines provided by the University.

Thesis Project
Following approval of the thesis proposal, the student will begin the research project. The thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is approved, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be the original work of the student and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement of the professional field.

The thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of the thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If the thesis takes the form of a major scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

Review of Thesis
Once the students have prepared the thesis manuscript, they will be asked to schedule the formal review process. The primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area will conduct the formal physical review of the thesis manuscript and the oral review of thesis.

The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to the underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and the presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The oral examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of the thesis. The faculty reviewers explore issues related to the thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the thesis review process is a set of final expectations directing the student through the remaining tasks for completing the thesis manuscript. Once the final manuscript is approved, the student will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later ship the bound thesis to the University for permanent archival storage.

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Online Libraries, Journals, Research Databases

Integral Health Library Resources Online
Online Learning Resources
Resources for Integral Studies
Resources for Researchers in CAM

Integral Health Library Resources Online
Complementary and Alternative Medicine Specialist Library
National Library for Health
Complementary and Alternative Medicine Evidence Online (CAMEOL)
CAM on PubMed, NCCAM Medline Library Database
British Homeopathic Library
Herbal Medicine Library
Research Database on QiGong and Chi Energy Practices and Therapies
International Bibliography/Database on Dietary Supplements
National Library of Medicine
Comprehensive Collective Universities Free Online Library

Online Learning Resources
Complementary and Alternative Medicine Specialist Library
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (eCAM)
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Complementary Therapies in Medicine
The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies
Research in Complementary and Classical Natural Medicine
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

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Resources for Integral Studies

Oxford Handbook of Complementary Medicine
The Oxford Handbook of Complementary Medicine has just been published. For more information, please visit the OUP Website

Integral Salons Network
Integral Institute
Shambala Publications
Integral Health Research
Sounds True
Integrative Spirituality
Institute of Noetic Sciences
Wholistic Healing Research
Spiral Dynamics
Gaia Community
Enlighten Next

Resources for Researchers in CAM

From the INCAM Outcomes Database Team

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce that the highly anticipated IN-CAM Outcomes Database has been launched officially at the 3rd International Congress on Complementary Medicine Research in Sydney, Australia on March 31, 2008.

IN-CAM Outcomes Database

The goals of the database are to make practical information available on a wide range of outcome measures relevant to CAM research and to organize and categorize outcome measures within a unique framework of outcome domains that integrates measurable domains of health into a unified scheme. We hope that you find this searchable, interactive and educational database useful in your research and practice endeavors. We look forward to your feedback.

Sincerely,

Professor Marja Verhoef
Dr. Mark Ware
Trish Dryden
Dr. Charlotte Paterson
Laura Weeks
Ania Kania
Linda Ferguson
Devon Mallory
Patrick Gignac, PhD

Launch of the European Chapter of ISCMR Professor Willich, the host of The European Congress of Integrative Medicine has given ISCMR the opportunity to launch the European Chapter of ISCMR at a satellite meeting attached to the conference. The satellite meeting will take place Saturday, 8th November. Please consider the attendance at the conference or come to our satellite meeting as the European Chapter should become a lively platform for CAM research in Europe. Fur further details, feel free to contact Dr. Corina Guthlin

Questions or suggestions? We would like to hear from you. Please contact us

info@iscmr.org
European Chapter of ISCMR Website

Additional Receipt Dates for Osher Foundation/NCCAM CAM Practitioner Research Career Development Award (K01)
NCCAM announces an increase in the number of receipt dates for PAR-07-003. Starting in February 2008, applications receipt/submission dates will be three times per year on the standard receipt dates for new K series applications and for renewal/resubmission/revision K series applications. AIDS and AIDS-related applications submitted in response to this F0A should be submitted on the standard AIDS and AIDS-related dates. ...Learn More

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Resources and Links for Integral Health Studies

Swiss Government on Homeopathy
The two links below discuss the Swiss government's comprehensive analysis, review, and research report on the validity, efficacy, safety, scientific and clinical utility, and integrative basis for homeopathy showing the evidence to be very much in its favor with calls to integrate, expand, and develop further.
Homeopathy in Healthcare Effectiveness, Appropriateness, Safety, Costs
The Swiss Government's Remarkable Report on Homeopathic Medicine

University of Exter, Complementary Medicine<
Peninsula Medical School seeks to employ two Research Fellows. For further information, please follow the links below: Associate Research Fellow in Herbal Medicine
Senior Research Fellow in Complementary Medicine

University of Southhampton
Graduates with a good first degree and a background in Health Care, Psychology, Social Science or other relevant discipline, who are interested in an academic career in Primary Care research, are invited to apply for a research training fellowship with the aim of working towards a PhD. Funding for three years is available, from the Department of Health.
For further information, please visit their website onPhD Studentship in Primary Care

Educational and Training Resources

CoreIntegral
The CoreIntegral mission is to expand access to the Integral approach while ensuring the integrity of a comprehensive Integral understanding. This might sound lofty, but we also think it's achievable. By revolutionizing how you generate applied Integral knowledge and by making that learning more accessible, we envision a growing community of more effective Integral practitioners and scholars.
Visit CoreIntegral Website

International Society for the Study of Subtle Energies and Energy Medicine (ISSSEEM)
ISSSEEM is an international non-profit interdisciplinary organization dedicated to exploring and applying subtle energies as they relate to the experience of consciousness, healing, and human potential. ISSSEEM is in a unique position, acting both as a bridge builder between communities and a leader in the field, offering a community with a widespread appreciation of the energetic component within many disciplines including quantum physics, therapeutic modalities, healing, psychology, consciousness, psi and the understanding of our multidimensional existence.
Homeopathy in Healthcare Effectiveness, Appropriateness, Safety, Costs

The Swiss Government's Remarkable Report on Homeopathic Medicine

ISSSEEM website

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Activity Postings

2013 Bridging the Hearts & Minds of Youth , Mindfulness in Clinical Practice, Education and Research
Catamaran Hotel, San Diego, California, 1-3 February 2013

Bridges to Healthy Living Conference
July 12-14, 2013 Colorado Integrative Medicine Conference

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Program Recognition and Affiliation

The Research Council for Complementary Medicine
Innersource
Integral Institute
British Institute of Homeopathy USA
Center for Traditional Medicine


RCCM was founded in 1983 by a group of enthusiastic practitioners and researchers from both orthodox and complementary medicine. Today, their aim is to develop and extend the evidence base for complementary medicine in order to provide practitioners and their patients with information about the effectiveness of individual therapies and the treatment of specific conditions. Akamai was listed with RCCM beginning in 2004.
27a Devonshire Street, London W1G 6PN
Tel: 020-7935-7499
RCCM Enquiries
Akamai Listing
RCCM Website


Innersource
Innersource provides information and self-study programs for developing optimal health, personal growth, spiritual development, and well-being through Energy Medicine, Energy Psychology and Conscious Living programs for professionals, laypersons and students. Innersource also offers energy psychology information, research, and support, award-winning home-study training resources for professionals, laypersons, and graduate students. Innersource began collaboration with Akamai during 2005.
Innersource Website


Integral Institute is a 501(c)(3) non-profit tax-exempt organization dedicated to bringing the integral approach to bear on personal and global issues. Akamai supports the mission of the Integral Institute.
Visit Integral Institute Website


The British Institute of Homeopathy is recognized as the largest, most successful school of homeopathic medicine in the world. Internationally recognized for excellence in education, it offers an outstanding curriculum, featuring a student body exceeding 11,000 residing in 80 countries. The British Institute of Homeopathy is best known for its exceptional, self-paced distance education courses, professional personal tutors and interactive lessons which makes for a thoroughly enjoyable educational experience for the dedicated student. BIH and Akamai have entered into a credit transfer agreement whereby BIH students may import credits earned into the Akamai CAM and Integral Health Studies degree programs.
BIH-USA Email
BIH-USA Website


Center for Traditional Medicine
The Center for Traditional Medicine promotes the cross- cultural healing arts and sciences and advances social change to benefit individual and community health through activist scholarship, research and practice.
Visit Center website

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PROGRAM FACULTY
The Integral Health Science faculty spans the globe with representative perspectives and a high degree of scholarly preparation, research and professional achievement. Presently, faculty for this program represents the nations of Canada, USA, Japan, and Germany, and the UK.

Christopher K. Johannes, BA, MA, M.Ed. Ph.D. (Psychology), D.Sc. DHM, HD (R.Hom), D.Hom., NCC, LMHC, LPC, RPP, MARH, TFT Dx.
Dr. Johannes holds degrees in Liberal Arts (AGS), Psychology (AA, BA), Health Psychology (MA), Community College Education (MEd), and has earned a Doctorate in Transpersonal Psychology (Ph.D.). Dr. Johannes also holds a doctorate in Homeopathic Medicine (DHM), professional registration as a homeopathic doctor [H.D.(R.Hom.)], and an honorary doctorate in Complementary Medicine (D.Sc.). He also received post-graduate professional training in Counselling Psychology and is a National Board Certified Counselor (NCC), Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC), a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), Registered Psychotherapist (MNCP), Registered Polarity Practitioner (RPP), Registered Homeopath (R.Hom., MARH), Certified Holistic Health Counselor (CHHC), Master Practitioner of Neurolinguistic Psychology (MNLP), Registered Complementary Healthcare Practitioner (MGCP), Internationally Certified Aromatherapist (ICA), Hypnotherapist (RHt), Thought Field Therapy Practitioner (TFT Dx), Certified EMDR Therapist (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) and holds Arizona State Board Community College Teaching Certification in Psychology and Counseling. Dr. Johannes is a fellow of the British Institute of Homeopathy, a graduate of the Hahnemann Academy of North America (D.Hom.) and is a full member of other professional associations in the UK and USA. He served as a lecturer at Niigata Sangyo University, Nagaoka University of Technology, and Kansai Gaidai University in Japan, and was Visiting Lecturer in Psychology at the University of North London and adjunct faculty of the College of Homeopathy in London, England. He also developed and Chaired the distance education programs at Greenwich University in Complementary Medicine and Psychology. Dr. Johannes' journal articles in Psychotherapy, Counseling Psychology, Homeopathic Medicine have been published in UK, Japan and the United States. His private group practice in England and Japan have offered multimodal treatment services integrating homeopathic and behavioral medicine, polarity therapy, counseling and psychotherapy. His recent book Homeopathy and Mental Health Care has received excellent reviews. Chris also enjoys acting and has appeared in a number of TV shows and movies.

James O. Wear, Ph.D., CCE, CHSP, FASHE
James O. Wear holds a B.S. (l959), M.S. (l960), and Ph.D. (l961) from the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville, AR). He was Managing Director, Little Rock Employee Education Resource Center (LREERC), Department of Veterans Affairs. With the Department of Veterans Affairs, he is responsible for training of engineering and safety personnel in their 172 hospitals, which includes about 10,000 employees. Dr. Wear was Professor, Biomedical Instrumentation Technology, College of Health Related Professions, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (Little Rock, AR) from 1972-2000. He is active in the American College of Clinical Engineering, Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation and the American Society of Healthcare Engineering. Dr. Wear is a Certified Clinical Engineer and a Certified Health Care Safety Professional. He is a Fellow in the American Society of Healthcare Engineering. He has served on the Certification Board of Examiners for Biomedical Engineering Technician, Clinical Engineers, and Health Care Safety Professionals. Dr. Wear is a founder and co-chairman of the Commission for the Advancement of Healthcare technology Management in Asia (CAHTMA). This organization will develop certification programs and workshops in healthcare technology management for countries in Asia. Dr. Wear has written over 150 publications in national journals in Chemistry, Clinical and Biomedical Engineering, and Hospital Safety, twenty chapters in books and co-authored Clinical Engineering Manual, Introduction to Clinical Engineering, Hospital Safety Manual, BMET Handbook, Hospital Safety Handbook, Hospital Equipment Preventive Maintenance Manual, Nursing Home Equipment Preventive Maintenance Manual, and Hospital Engineering Manual. Dr. Wear has made over 200 presentations at regional, national and international meetings in Chemistry, Clinical and Biomedical Engineering, and Hospital Safety. He has lectured in workshops and courses in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Australia, Thailand, Brazil, Nepal, South Africa, Singapore and Malaysia. Many of these presentations have been for the World Health Organization with the American College of Clinical Engineering. Dr. Wear has taught a graduate course in Clinical Engineering Management at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

Elliot Benjamin, Ph.D.
Elliot Benjamin is a philosopher, counselor, mathematician, musician, and writer, with over fifty published articles in the areas of spirituality and awareness of cult dangers, art and mental disturbance, pure mathematics, and mathematics education. To date, he has three self-published books" Modern Religions: An Experiential Analysis and Exposure, Art and Mental Illness, and Numberama: Recreational Number Theory in the School System. Dr. Benjamin earned his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Maine in 1996, and his Master's degree in Counseling from Boston State College in 1977. He is currently working toward a Ph.D. in psychology with a concentration in Consciousness and Spirituality at Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center. Dr. Benjamin was a mathematics professor for 21 years, and has had a variety of experience within the mental health field. He rounds out his diversity of professional interests by playing the piano at nursing homes and retirement homes.

Traian D. Stanciulescu, Ph.D.
Dr. Stanciulescu, born in 1951 (Potlogi, Romania), has an interdisciplinary academic formation: architecture & philosophy and history faculty (psychology and sociology included). He has worked as an architect, as a lyceum professor, and finally as a university professor at the University of Iaşi. As a scientific researcher at National Inventics Institute (1993-2008), he auto-didactically studied biophotonics and its emergent implications in the field of human health optimization, having many original contributions, theoretical and practical (inventions) also. He has didactic abilities in the field of teaching “know how” disciplines, such as semiotics, hermeneutics, creatology, persuasion strategies, etc. which he synergetically applied in teaching and research activity. He is involved in many social-cultural events, being an efficient leader, permanently involved in public relationships by conferences, courses, etc. He has abilities in creative fields such as: poetry, music and painting, directly used for a personal “connection energy” preservation.

Mary Jo Bulbrook, EdD, RN, C CSEM, SEM, CHTP/I
Dr. Mary Jo Bulbrook is a medical intuitive and founder of Transform Your Life through Energy Medicine (TYLEM)™. It is based on her distinguished 20-year career as a university professor and clinical specialist in psychiatric mental health nursing. From 1974-84, she was a key figure in the development of world-renowned family therapist Virginia Satir’s teaching organization, Avanta Network. Drawing on their 12 years together, elements from Virginia’s teachings and philosophy were integrated with Dr. Bulbrook’s holistic nursing theory "Healing From Within and Without". Over the next decade, Dr. Bulbrook’s therapy training evolved into the "Energetic Healing" program. In 2004, the title of the program was changed to its’ current name, representing the growth and expansion from the original model. The work continues to advance today. Over the last three decades, Dr. Bulbrook has been a pioneer in the energy medicine field. She began teaching and practicing Therapeutic Touch and Touch for Health in the seventies, and moved to teaching her own energy material in the eighties. From 1990-2004, Dr. Bulbrook was active in the leadership of Healing Touch. She developed both HT and her own program in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Peru, Ireland and Chile, as well as throughout the US and Canada. Mary Jo has collaborated with international healers such as Rosalyn Bruyere, Credo Mutwa (South African Sangoma), Bob Randall (Aborigine elder), and Rose Pere (Maori Tohuna). In 1989, Dr. Bulbrook was honored with the Canadian Holistic Nurse of the Year award. From this rich background, she was able to create a highly effective and easy to implement model of advanced psycho-spiritual treatment

James L. Oschman, Ph.D.
Jim Oschman is the award-winning author of Energy Medicine: the scientific basis, published in the Spring of 2000 by Churchill Livingston/Harcourt, Edinburgh. The book is giving the most ardent skeptics a logical and scientifically sound basis for a variety of complementary and alternative therapies. Recently, Elsevier Health Sciences published Jim's second book, Energy Medicine in Therapeutics and Human Performance. The research provides new insights into the ways the body can function in peak athletic and artistic performances and in profound therapeutic encounters. Jim lectures widely on the science behind a variety of complementary and alternative therapies. His research has led the useful insights that can help all therapists better understand and advance their work and explain it to others. Jim has both the academic credentials and the background in alternative therapies to carry out his explorations. He has degrees in Biophysics and Biology from the University of Pittsburg and has worked in major research labs around the world. His scientific papers have been published in the world's leading journals. To learn about the theories and practices underlying complementary methods, Jim has both taught and attended various classes around the world and experienced a wide range of bodywork techniques. He has also become involved in the development of cutting edge medical devices and other applications of the emerging concepts of energy medicine. Jim is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the National Foundation for Alternative Medicine, and is the recipient of the Foundation's Founders Award. He has also received a Distinguished Service Award from the Rolf Institute.

Corina Guethlin, MS, Ph.D.
Ms. Güthlin earned her psychology degree in 1995 and concluded her studies at the University of Eichstatt with a Diploma, a degree equivalent with the M.Sc. Since her graduation, she has worked in the field of evaluating complementary medicine. She completed a randomly controlled trial of massage therapy in pain patients. Over the course of the past eight years she has managed a study on the effectiveness of acupuncture and homeopathy in general practice. This study included 1000 practitioners and 5000 patients. She is currently in the very last phase of her Ph.D. thesis on methodological problems in quality of life measurement. Measurement issues and evaluative research have always been of great importance to Ms. Güthlin, complementing her increasing interest in CAM medicine as a patient centered approach. Ms. Güthlin served as a research assistant and research fellow with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology at the University of Freiburg, Germany. She completed her internship with the Center for Research and Dissemination at York University, UK and is currently studying treatment of cancer patients with homeopathy through a controlled, multicentered, epidemiological cohort study with matched pairs. She is widely published in the fields of evaluation methodology and Complementary Medicine, completing more than twenty projects since 1997. Ms. Güthlin has also gained expertise in guiding students during the proposal and writing phases of her Diploma thesis and doctoral dissertation papers.

Henry Zeidan, Ph.D.
Dr. Zeidan received his Ph.D in Biomedical Sciences "Biochemistry" at The University of Hawaii, School of Medicine in 1979. He did his postdoctoral training in Medicinal chemistry and Pharmacognosy at the Medical Center of The University of Illinois, School of Pharmacy. Dr. Zeidan then joined the University of Michigan, the clinical chemistry division at Cleveland State University, as an assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Clinical Chemistry. He then joined the biomedical faculty at Atlanta University Graduate School. He served as a major Professor for five graduate students. Two received a Ph.D in Biochemistry under his mentorship. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1988. In 1991, he moved to Life University, Basic Sciences Division and was promoted to Professor in 1996. He was known among his students as a talented professor with a chess game approach and was awarded a “Ph.T” (putting him or her through) degree by numerous Professional students. Dr. Zeidan held positions as Visiting Professor in St. Matthew School of Medicine, University of Texas, Kuwait University, and Professor of Biomedical Sciences at St. Christopher’s School of Medicine, Greenwich University, and Graduate School of Health Sciences. He served as a major Professor of two graduate students who obtained their Ph.D in Preventive Medicine and Human Physiology. He served as an Educational Mentor at Creighton University, School of Pharmacy, and Pharm D Program. He received recognitions as outstanding teacher, Smith Kline & French Laboratories faculty award for outstanding faculty and Fulbright Scholar. He acted as a consultant to Cairo University, National Research Center, Cairo and Kuwait University. Dr. Zeidan also acted as a clinical Laboratory Director to several Reference Laboratories. Henry is a Fellow of National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry, Diplomat of American Board of Bioanalysis, and a Fellow of the Association of Clinical Scientists. Dr. Zeidan has numerous publications. His major research focused on the application of Spin Labels in Biomedicine and harmacology, the molecular mechanisms of biogenic amines degradation and Sickle hemoglobin. Dr. Zeidan accepted a Position as Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Nevada College of Pharmacy in 2003. Henry enjoys spending his leisure time with his dedicated wife and lovely five children. He enjoys playing tennis, swimming, traveling, chess and hunting two birds with one stone.

Peter Jones, Ph.D.
Dr. Jones is a researcher at the Bauu Institute, where he works with indigenous peoples on ethnomedicine, cultural and natural resource management, and social justice projects. He holds a Ph.D. in Psychology from Saybrook Graduate School in San Francisco and a BA in Anthropology, Spanish, and religious Studies from the University of Colorado, Boulder. His dissertation topic was "Unifying the Concept of Consciousness across the Disciplines: A Cross-Cultural Concept-Based Approach." Dr. Jones has worked across the United states, Mexico and Dominican Republic where he has helped indigenous peoples develop, document, and maintain traditional cultural lifeways. He has published articles on a wide range of topics including complementary and alternative medicine, peyote, psychology and cultural survival. His academic and research interests include complementary and alternative medicine mind-body issues, spirituality, anomalous experiences, and physical, mental and spiritual regeneration.

Michael J. Cohen, Ed.D.
Michael J. Cohen is an ecopsychologist who founded and coordinates Project NatureConnect, a distance learning degree program and extended education workshop and course offerings from The Institute of Global Education, a United Nations Non-Governmental Organization. He chairs the Department of Integrated Ecology on San Juan Island, Washington and networks his Natural Systems Thinking Process. For 36 years, Dr. Cohen has lived outdoors year round while researching, teaching and enjoying multi-sensory nature activities. He established and directed degree granting environmental outdoor education programs for the Trailside Country School, Lesley College, and the National Audubon Society. Dr. Cohen's many books and articles include Reconnecting With Nature: Finding Wellness through Restoring your Bond with the Earth, the 1990 award winning Connecting With Nature: Creating Moments that Let Earth Teach, and the self-guiding applied ecopsychology training manual, Well Mind, Well Earth. His most recent title, Einstein's World is now an integral part of an accredited graduate course.

Stanley Krippner, Ph.D.
Dr. Krippner is Professor of Psychology at the Saybrook Graduate School and distinguished member of Council of Sages, California Institute of Integral Studies, both in San Francisco. For many years he was Director of the Dream Laboratory at Maimonides Medical Center in New York, following Directorship of the Child Study Center at Kent State University. He has served as Visiting Professor or Lecturer at universities worldwide, including the Academy of Pedagogical Sciences in Moscow and the Academy of Science in Beijing. He serves on the editorial board of twelve journals, including the Journal of Transpersonal Psychology and the Journal of Indian Psychology. His many books include Human Possibilities, Healing States, The Realms of Healing and Song of the Siren. He is author or co-author of more than 500 articles in professional journals. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis. He is a former President of the Association for Humanistic Psychology and the Parapsychological Association. Dr. Krippner earned his BS at the University of Wisconsin and his MA and Ph.D. at Northwestern University.

Anthony Maranto, Ph.D.
Dr. Maranto currently serves as an environmental consultant and program manager for the U.S. Army Environmental Center at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD. He is also the Director of the Institute for Scientific Advisement, a scientific and educational consulting firm in Westminster, MD. Dr. Maranto received his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County; his MA in Environmental Science from Goddard College and his Ph.D. in Environmental Science from the Union Institute. As a researcher and educator, Dr. Maranto has a wide range of experiences and interests. He was formerly the Director of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources' Radioecology Laboratory. Additionally, he has held posts in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and in the Department of Biology at Essex Community College in Baltimore. He has published and presented on numerous topics including carcinogenic risk assessment, environmental management, radioecology, health physics, data quality control and neurological receptor modeling.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Bachelor of Health Science
Master of Health Science

Course Descriptions Bachelor of Health Science

IHS 401: Complementary and Alternative Medicine I (3 credits)
This course provides a thorough, comprehensive and up-to date survey of the theories, principles, practices of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), examining history, theory, principles, scope, research, key players and resources, applied practice/clinical methodologies, the basic economic, institutional and policy developments relevant to CAM, and ramifications for the evolving shape of a mainstream integral – integrative medicine. This is one of the required core courses in the Complementary Medicine generalist program and provides the fundamental grounding in CAM philosophies and practice to ontextualize subsequent studies. As it is a core course, it is demanding and time intensive; the learner is advised to exercise prudence if planning to take more than one additional course concurrently. Prerequisite: IHS 442, 443, 445. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 402: The Integral Model and Philosophy of Self, Culture, and Nature (3 credits)
This survey course offers an in depth study of Ken Wilber’s All Quadrants All Levels Model of integral theory and practice. Participants will be introduced to an understanding of the four quadrants, states of consciousness, stages of development, lines of development, and types. Students will be introduced to applications of the integral model to science and religion, world maps of the cosmos, as well as medicine and education. Participants will gain experiential understanding of this model by beginning an integral practice of their own using the guidelines presented. [Instructor: Dr. Peggy Thayer]

IHS 403: Foundations of Health Psychology (3 credits)
This introductory course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of Health Psychology. It gives a theoretical background of the most important models in health psychology (health belief model, protection-motivation-theory, theory of planned behavior,. theory of reasoned action) and gives insight into the broad range of topics in health psychology from stress to communication in medical encounters. Prerequisites: None). [Instructor: Dr. Corina Guethlin]

IHS 404: Modern Health Care Systems (3 credits)

IHS 405: Energy Medicine I (3 credits)
This introductory time intensive (reading, audio/video, writing and applied practise), foundational, and experiential course (with external examination of applied component) provides a thorough survey and comprehensive overview of the field of Energy Medicine, including underpinning theory, research, developments, applied practice, and methods of self-care and treatment. The course will provide the student with many core references and resources (and links to these) for the subsequent study, research, and applied work in the field of CAM related Energy Medicine. Prerequisites:IHS 442, 443, 445. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 406: Introduction to Public Health (3 credits)
The course covers basic concepts vis- -vis public health and public health practice. Health, illness and various factors that influence health status are discussed. It also presents data and information on health status and risk factors. The course examines the functions of public health and public health practice, the tools that have been developed to improve public health practice. The course also explains the government’s role in public health. It discusses the infrastructure of public health and public health programs and services, and non-medical approaches to public health. Finally, the course deals with the limits to conventional public health and future challenges for public health. [Author and Instructor: Dr. James Wear]

IHS 408: Positive Psychology and Integral Lifestyle (3 credits)
This required multimedia (DVD, CD, readings, visuals) course examines the interface of the rapidly developing field of positive psychology with applied integral lifestyle practices (Wilberian AQAL ILP) toward building and maintaining optimal levels of integral health and well being. Included are Eastern and cross-cultural perspectives on “happiness” and well-being, examination of “the good life”, character strengths and virtues, development of talents and abilities, flow, optimism, hardiness, the role of values, resilience, compassion, gratitude, love, spirituality, service, hope, savoring, transformation of suffering, and ‘all quadrant’ lifestyle practices (experiential component) and ‘positive psychology exercises’ that converge in their importance for Integral Health. Regular experiential exercises are required of the student throughout this course. Prerequisites: Introductory course in Psychology; IHS 414. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 409: Complementary and Alternative Medicine II (3 credits)

IHS 410: Behavioral Medicine I (3 credits)
This is a comprehensive introductory course to the field of Behavioral Medicine, with emphasis on the provider-patient relationship, principles of applied behavioral health, and effective case management strategies for primary care and greater health service settings. A case-based and evidence-based approach for each treatment issue is examined, including underpinning theories and research in psychoneuroimmunology as they apply to clinical management. Prerequisites: IHS 443, 403 or permission of the course instructor.

IHS 411: Research Methods in Health and Social Sciences (3 credits)
This course focuses on how to do research. Topics covered include research methods, the ethics of doing research, problems of validity and reliability, sampling methods, various approaches to research and statistical methods. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Donald F. Logsdon Jr.]

IHS 412: Energy Medicine II -Energy Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides a state of the art introduction, comprehensive overview, and applied experiential exercises in Energy Psychology, covering research, theory and practice. The course requires emphasizes a directly experiential and applied approach to learning, such that the concepts and methods of Energy Psychology can readily be integrated and applied. Professional Continuing Education credit and certification of completion is awarded upon passing the comprehensive final examination (taken externally through InnerSource and the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology). Prerequisites: IHS 443, 441 (or instructor approval), 413 (or instructor approval). [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 413: Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3 credits)
Prerequisite: IHS 441: Psychopathology)

IHS 414A: Integral Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides an defining overview of the Integral Psychology, including it’s theory and principles, underpinning integral model, historical developments, transformational and applied value, interdisciplinary perspective and meaning, imperatives and future directions. Prerequisites: IHS 402, 443. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 414B: Integral Psychology (3 credits)
This survey course offers an in depth study of Integral Psychology as presented by Ken Wilber and Christian de Quincey. The course will look at the self, levels, waves, and developmental streams, as well as states of consciousness, relationships, different ways of knowing, Bohmian dialogue and socio-cultural evolution. Participants will be presented with an integrative model of consciousness, psychology and therapy, looking at the self, relationships, and consciousness from sub-conscious, to self-conscious to super-conscious. [Instructor: Dr. Peggy Thayer]

IHS 415: Ecological Health (3 credits)
This course will explain the role of biology in the ecological model of population-based health. It will integrate the general biological and molecular concepts into public health. This course will also explain the biological and molecular concepts into public health and will look at how biological, chemical, and physical agents affect human health. [Dr. Donald F. Logsdon Jr]

IHS 416: Energy Medicine III (3 credits)

IHS 418: Integral Health Education and Promotion (3 credits)

IHS 419: Integral Ethics and Professional Development (3 credits)

IHS 420: Integral Health and the Future of Healthcare (3 credits)
This course provides a thorough, comprehensive and up-to date survey of the emerging field of Integral Medicine and practices in Mind-Body Healing, examining history, development, theory, principles, scope, research, key players and resources, applied methods transformational practice. This is flagship course of the three required core courses in the Integral Health Studies program, and is essential for placing your chosen studies and profession (the applied field) in context and perspective. Prerequisites: IHS 401, 402, 404, 408. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 421: Naturopathy I (3 credits)
This course provides a thorough, integrated and comprehensive survey of the theories, principles, and clinical applications of Naturopathy, particularly as applied to mind-body and behavioral health. This is a core required course of the Behavioral Naturopathy program, providing the foundational grounding necessary for advanced studies to follow. Prerequisites: IHS 442, 445. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 422: Naturopathy II (3 credits)

IHS 423: Homeopathy I (3 credits)
This intensive course provides a thorough and comprehensive introductory grounding in Homeopathy, examining its theoretical underpinnings and core principles, historical trends and developments, research base, leading figures and resources, basic materia medica, the experience of the patient/consumer, and overviews of applied methods (including case-taking) in clinical practice. Though not required, this is course is ideally followed by HIS 424: Homeopathy II. Prerequisites: IHS 442, IHS 445. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 424: Homeopathy II (3 credits)
With a grounding of the material covered in Homeopathy 1 (IHS 423), this course continues with an introductory overview of applied methods and clinical applications in practice, including use of the homeopathic repertory, comparative material medica, comparative clinical differentials, case taking exercises, case taking analysis, case management, follow-up analysis (treatment outcomes), and principles involved in complex cases. For those with no prior or limited homeopathic training, HIS 423: Homeopathy 1 MUST be taken before enrolling for this course. Prerequisites: IHS 423, IHS 442, IHS 445. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 425: Homeopathy III (3 credits)

IHS 426: Herbal Medicine I (3 credits)

IHS 427: Aromatherapy (3 credits)
The course provides an introduction to basic principles and practices of aromatherapy and the physiological effects and uses of essential oils. Participants will explore current and historical literature on aromatherapy, research the use of essential oils for specific conditions, and complete case studies. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Lisa Mertz]

IHS 428: Somatic Healing and Bodywork I (3 credits)

IHS 429: Somatic Healing and Bodywork II (3 credits)

IHS 430: Movement and Breathwork I (3 credits)

IHS 431: Movement and Breathwork II (3 credits)

IHS 433: Behavioral Medicine II (3 credits) This course expands on topics examined in IHS 410 (Behavioral Medicine I) with greater detail and emphasis on the various behavioral medicine treatments, clinical/applied methods and treatment approaches toward various health challenges. An empirically based and practical clinical outline and protocol for common medical diagnoses are outlined, with examination of assessments, intervention rationale, and evidence for outcomes. An additional focus in on the impact of hospitalization and medical care on the patient, the psychobiology of illness, and psychological issues in dealing with acute illness and surgery. Prerequisites: HIS 410, 443, 403 or permission of the course instructor. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

IHS 434: Spirituality and Awareness of Cult Dangers (3 credits)
This course is designed to enable students to evaluate the cult dangers as well as spiritual benefits of religious and spiritual groups, especially recently formed spiritual organizations that are currently controversial in regard to their possible cult characteristics. The emphasis will be upon "experiential" valuation, and it is expected that students will be utilizing their experiences in either their own religious backgrounds or preferably their personal explorations of alternative spiritual groups. There will be required readings describing general factors involved with cult dangers of spiritual groups, as well as specific alternative spiritual groups and religious indoctrination. There will also be recommended readings that include cult awareness articles from journals and websites, inclusive of the course instructor’s own work on this topic.

IHS 435: Noetic Sciences I (3 credits)

IHS 436: Transpersonal Psychology Developmental Alchemy (3 credits)
Although alchemists appear to have sought how to make gold out of lead, they were in fact uncovering the spiritual pathways towards individuation. Jung’s approach to individuation being teleological, suffering and struggles are seen as sign posts for attaining a higher level of spiritual development rather than discomforts to be relieved. The alchemical pathways are steps towards that achievement. In this course, students study the alchemical processes that describe the heroic journey the soul must make to evolve to higher consciousness. These processes are expressed through poetry, music, the visual arts, visionary experiences, dreams and fairytales. The student will keep a journal to analyze experiences from these fields. In a 20 double-spaced typewritten page, student will expose understanding of the alchemical processes and their transformational goal. Along the way, the student will receive scholarly guidance, not therapy. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Claudine Jeanrenaud]

IHS 437: Eastern Healing Traditions I (3 credits)

IHS 438: Eastern Healing Traditions II (3 credits)

IHS 439: Advances toward Ecological Health (3 credits)

IHS 440: Integral Health Care Systems (3 credits)

IHS 441: Psychopathology (3 credits)

IHS 442: Medical Terminology (2 credits)
This course provides an overview of medical terminology, prefixes, suffixes, and roots, and explores how medical terminology is used with regard to the systems of the body. [Author and instructor: Dr. Lisa Mertz]

IHS 443: Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
Students are introduced to the major areas of psychology. They are introduced to psychological theories and concepts, as well as the history and major figures of the field. Topics include disorders and treatments, personality and learning theories, and the internal and external factors that influence human development and behavior. Additionally, this course emphasizes how psychological principles and concepts relate to our personal and professional relationships.

IHS 444: Introductory Statistics (3 credits)
A user-friendly introductory statistics course teaching both descriptive and inferential statistics. An online student’s study guide is also provided at the companion website. This course teaches basic statistics and the art of hypothesis testing in a student-friendly way. It emphasis on the underlying ideas rather than on formulas. Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Corina Guthlin]

IHS 445 Anatomy and Physiology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to study human anatomy and physiology. Topics covered include: the cell and tissue organization, the organs and systems including the integumentary system, cartilage and bone, muscle, the nervous system, the senses, the endocrine system, the circulatory system, the respiratory system, the digestive system, the urinary system and the reproductive system. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Donald F. Logsdon Jr.]

IHS 446 Principles in Human Biology
This course focuses on principles of human biology with emphasis on topics in pathophysiology, nutrition and interrelationships among the systems. The course begins by considering the central unit of the human body, the cell and introduces the major chemical and biological principles through the study of the human body. In this course, the student will gain an enhanced understanding of the complexity of biological systems and how these sophisticated systems are tightly controlled by complex communication mechanisms that include hormonal and neuronal systems in order to maintain a steady state known as homeostasis. An overview of various physiological systems and their functions will be addressed to assist the student to understand the interrelationship among these systems. The course will then introduce the student to the DNA structure that ties all life together as the parts of the DNA molecule are identical in all living things. Finally, the student will understand what is meant by the term “biotechnology” and how is it used for the possible improvement of human biology. Exercise, nutrition and patho-physiological journals relate to these goals and will be a component of the grade for the course. Critical thinking and debates about topics are other components of the grade. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Henry Zeidan]

IHS 447: Intermediate Statistics (3 credits)
This is an user-friendly intermediate statistics course teaching mainly analysis of variance and the statistical background for multiple comparisons. Also noninferiority and equivalence trials and economic analyses as well as the assessment of diagnostic tools are introduced. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Corina Guthlin]

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IHS 451: Inner Practicum and Transformational Practice (3 credits)
Bachelor’s students must investigate core aspects of the discipline within the professional environment through close contact with practitioners and “real world” situations. Students should participate in the field study for a minimum of 150 contact hours. The field placement is expected to afford students appropriate practical hands on experience and in-depth knowledge of their areas of practice. Students must prepare a field study proposal according to University guidelines prior to undertaking the course. Under the supervision of assigned instructors, students will select from a range of personal development, growth, and transformative practices (e.g. meditative/contemplative, art/expressive, interpersonal/psychological, yoga, breathwork, bodywork, cultural expeditions, volunteer/service, combinations of these, etc.) and document their experiences on life domains relevant to health, healing, and wellness. The student can choose to undergo these experiences in retreats, intensives, community services, home practices, social gatherings, external trainings, health and wellness centers, spas. Students complete a daily journal and prepare a scholarly paper summarizing their findings for the field study. NOTE: Students may elect to take additional field study elements to a maximum of 9 credits. [Instructor: To be assigned]

IHS 465: Research Methods in Social Science and Health Sciences (3 credits)
This straightforward and fun course introduces research methods and the entire cycle of the research process, including conceptualization and ethics, design, measurement, and analysis providing interactive and web-based learning features. It is build along the comprehensive web-based guide to conducting research, The Research Methods Knowledge Base by Trochim & Deonnelly. It covers not only experimental and quasi-experimental design, but also qualitative approaches, it gives a solid introduction into the language of research and guides through the basic statistics. Prerequisites: none. [Author and Instructor: Dr. Corina Guthlin]

RES 499: Senior Project (6 credits)
The Senior Project is intended to provide the University with a quality review of the student’s overall academic competencies relative to the field of study. The process includes a brief proposal stage, data gathering and manuscript preparation stage, and a project review stage. Students are provided an opportunity to investigate an area of special interest in their academic concentration, which has potential for advancing their profession development. The Senior Project is presented in a formal manuscript approximating 20 to 25 double-spaced typewritten pages with proper referencing and citations of the scholarly literature. The student’s project should convey a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter. While most projects may take the form of a standard research project, with the mentor's approval, students may pursue another appropriate format such as an audio- or videotape project, a recorded public performance, a business plan, original work of art, detailed case study or another relevant project. [Author: Dr. Douglass Capogrossi, Instructor: To be assigned]

EXM 480: Final Examination (4 credits)
Once the senior project is satisfactorily completed, the University schedules the Final Examination. The assigned faculty advisor representing the student’s primary academic field will conduct the written and oral elements of the final examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Student answers are expected to draw from the academic competencies of their programs with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone or another approved synchronous conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses. [Author: Dr. Douglass Capogrossi, Instructor: To be assigned]

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Course Descriptions Master of Science

CAM 500: Readings in Complementary and Alternative Healthcare (6 credits)
Graduate students pursue detailed readings in the theories, principles and practices of complementary and alternative healthcare. Readings include energy medicine, somatic studies, and spiritual healing, behavioral and life style medicine, holistic health, integrative healthcare, complementary medicine, homeopathic medicine, ayurvedic medicine, Chinese medicine, and herbal medicine. Required of all Master's students in Complementary and Alternative Healthcare. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 502: Optimal Health (3 credits)
This course is structured from the premise that most diseases encountered are really failures of our "doctor within". A breakdown of our natural defenses is caused when signals are ignored from our body that would enable us to halt an unhealthy process, and the balance between our mind, body, and spirit is disturbed. Many emotional and mental illnesses result from the same ignoring of warning signals. This course focuses on the implications of an integral health approach to the well being of the person on all levels-the physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual. This includes processes of healing in the broadest sense-nurturing, organizing, growing, and inspiring. This brings about movement not only towards optimal health but finding the balance between the body, mind and spirit that transforms lifestyles. From the perspective of optimal health, the student will be able to empower others more effectively when he/she can experience personally the change in their own lifestyles. [Instructor: To be assigned]

IHS 502: The Integral Model and Philosophy of Self, Culture, and Nature (3 credits)
This survey course offers an in depth study of Ken Wilber’s All Quadrants All Levels Model of integral theory and practice. Participants will be introduced to an understanding of the four quadrants, states of consciousness, stages of development, lines of development, and types. Students will be introduced to applications of the integral model to science and religion, world maps of the cosmos, as well as medicine and education. Participants will gain experiential understanding of this model by beginning an integral practice of their own using the guidelines presented. [Instructor: Dr. Peggy Thayer]

CAM 504: Introduction to Systems of Alternative Healthcare (3 credits)
The course includes advanced study in the theory, underlying principles, and scientific support for the predominant traditions of complementary and alternative medicine available today. Traditions studied include Chinese medicine, ayurveda, naturopathic medicine, homeopathy, mind/body and behavioral medicine, chiropractic, osteopathy, massage therapy and bodywork, herbal and nutritional therapies, and energy medicine.[Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 506: Theories, Principles, and Practices of Holistic Health (3 credits)
This course is designed to give an overview of the field of Holistic Health and Healing, emphasizing the multi-cultural heritage and the principles and practices those cultures have developed for thousands of centuries. The mind-body-spirit nature of this field is the focus. Additionally, the transformational dimension will deal with optimal life style. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 508: Integrative Healthcare (3 credits)
Advanced study of challenges and issues facing the conventional model of healthcare delivery, and the rationale for integrative services. Students examine trends in morbidity and mortality, limitations of conventional medicine in treating chronic and degenerative illnesses, side effects of conventional healthcare practices, the changing economic climate of healthcare practice, trends in popular demand for complementary and alternative therapies, their economics and cost-effectiveness, political issues in the promotion or suppression of alternative and complementary therapies, and administrative challenges of moving toward integrated services.[Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 510: The Embodied Mind (3 credits)
Where is the mind located? Ida Rolf taught that memories are in our muscles, and Candace Pert has found emotions in our bodies' neuropeptides. Ordinarily, the dominant paradigm regards the immune system as a scientific construct that seems distant from our felt experience, as something that cannot be sensed. Somatic therapists know that one way into the immune system is through the contents of the subconscious mind via bodywork. This course considers interaction among experience, memory, imagery, and the body. The course looks at foundational works for Somatic Studies, including the work of Reich, Feldenkrais, Alexander, Grindler, and Selver. The student will be invited to survey these writers and compose short essays on their work. Then the student will choose one theorist to study in depth to write a final 15 page paper for the course. Is the body experienced as a machine, as spirit made flesh, as manifestation of mind? With anatomy as ground, this course surveys the spectrum of experience and the meaning of image. Required reading includes Gorman's Moving Anatomy. Essays and a final 15 page paper will be required. [Instructor: Dr. Lisa Mertz]

CAM 512: Historical Perspectives on the Body (3 credits)
Just as concepts of the body vary across culture, they also vary across time. Drawing from an array of readings from medical treatises to the writings of mystics to erotica, this course considers the construction of the human form from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Essays and a final 10-page paper will be required. [Instructor: Dr. Lisa Mertz]

CAM 513: Somatics in Multicultural Perspective (3 credits)
Whereas the dominant view of the body in European American culture is an egocentric view - individualistic and self-contained - other cultures experience the body as sociocentric - interdependent and permeable. Includes an investigation into contemporary theories of bodywork such as the works of Ilana Rubenfeld and Don Hanlon Johnson. This course provides an overview of cultural experiences of the indigenous body and its relationship to the spirit, and in this context, surveys healing methods such as soul retrieval, spirit extraction, exorcism, and community rituals. An annotated bibliography and a final 15 page paper will be required. This course considers five-element theory, meridians, the concept of Chi, Buddhist meditation, and kundalini yoga. The course also focuses on the work of the Japanese scholar Yasuo Yuasa who shows that Eastern philosophy views mind-body unity as a state to be acquired. He examines mind-body relations on a spectrum from dissociation to integration. Essays and a final 15 page paper will be required. [Instructor: Dr. Lisa Mertz]

IHS 514: Integral Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides an defining overview of the Integral Psychology, including it’s theory and principles, underpinning integral model, historical developments, transformational and applied value, interdisciplinary perspective and meaning, imperatives and future directions. [Instructor: Dr. Christopher Johannes]

CAM 521: Acupuncture (3 credits)
This course brings together new ideas in medicine focusing on the use of acupuncture. What are its advantages as well as disadvantages? What scientific studies have examined acupuncture and what have they found? The student will be allowed maximum freedom in the investigation of this subject.[Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 522: Traditional Medicine (3 credits)
Traditional medicine is the study of the medicines and treatments available and in use before the onset of what is presently called medical science. The student will be free to explore available literature and select those topics that the student feels of interest. [Instructor: Dr. Anthony Payne]

CAM 523: Herbal Medicine (3 credits)
Herbal medicine is the study of medicines derived form natural sources such as herbal teas and other concoctions that were in use in the past as well as in the future. Many of these medicines have found their way into modern medicine and they or a synthetic form of their potent drugs are in use today. This course allows the student to develop an understanding of the usefulness as well as the dangers of herbal medicines. [Instructor: Dr. Anthony Payne]

CAM 524: Natural Medicine (3 credits)
Natural medicine is the study of medicines in use or used in the past that nature provides without synthesizing the potent ingredients. This study covers a vast array to include tribal forms of medicine that are still practiced in some parts of this world. The students will be allowed to develop their own course of study for this course.[Instructor: Dr. Anthony Payne]

CAM 525 Touch Healing (3 credits)
Touch Healing has found its way into many practices. From the religious ceremonies that are performed in some churches to nurses practicing the healing art in an operating room, this practice and its practical value are far from understood. What does science offer us with respect to touch healing? This course allows the student the fredom to explore this subject without predjudices. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 526 Distance Healing (3 credits)
Distance Healing is practiced in some religious ceremonies and in medical environs as well. There is an entire range of activities which could be classified as distance healing. This healing involves as in some ceremonies the saying of words to a television audience as well as selected individuals encouraged by physicians to visualize the effects of some characterization of immune system attacking cancerous growths. How far has science gone in understanding this process which has its adherents? The student will be allowed to study this phenomena without limiting him/herself to predjudicial attitudes. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 527 Chiropractic Healing (3-6 credits)
There was a time when chiropractic healing was looked askance upon by mainstream medicine. For years people could not recover chiropractic medical expenses from health insurers. This is still true for some insurers. Is there any scientific basis for this healing art? What is its future? The student will be allowed to explore this healing practice. [Instructor: to be determined]

CAM 528 Dietary Healing (3 credits)
Healing through diet is in common practice. Mediacla physicians practice some form of dietary healing especially with patients suffering from cardiac problems, but there is an entire school of thought about how proper diets not only can prevent ilnesses, but reverse their course. There is much scientific evidence to support dietary healing, but what is really known about how and why some diets are preferable to others. This course will enable the student to pursue research in this subject. [Instructor: Dr. Anthony Payne]

CAM 529 Preventative Medicine (3 credits)
In China a patient used to pay the doctor as long as the patient remained in good health. When the patient got sick, he stopped paying the doctor. What are we doing in our medical systems about preventative medicine. Many insurers will reimburse you for expenses when you get sick, but not cover preventative measures. What do we understand about how to prevent illnesses? This course enables the interested student to explore this area. [Instructor: to be determined]

CAM 530: Modern Reiki Method I (3 credits)
This course assists the student in accessing Reiki and provides various ways in which the healing technique can be used. Students will receive the history, philosophy, theory, and practical application of Reiki. (Certification and Attunement I and II are extra and may be discussed with the instructor) [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 531: Modern Reiki Method II (3 credits)
This advanced course assists the student in accessing Reiki and provides various ways in which the healing technique can be used. Students will receive the history, philosophy, theory, and practical application of Reiki. Students will also receive Attunement III as part of the course. (Certification and Attunement III are extra and may be discussed with the instructor). [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 533: Essentials of Qi Gong (3 credits)
Students are introduced to standing techniques, breathing and relaxing techniques, internal movement, healing techniques, internal and external exercises, Qi meditation, the healer within, and healing energy in everyday life. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 534: The Root of Chinese Qi Gong (3 credits)
A more in-depth course on Qi Gong including: Qi Gong history, concepts of Qi Gong, categories of Qi Gong, regulating (the body, breathing, Qi, emotional mind, essence, spirit), the 12 primary Qi channels, spiritual Qi Gong, Taoist self-realization, Chinese principles and theory of Chi Gung, the three regulations, mental, physical, and emotional training, and advanced Chi Gung. The course also includes the work of Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 536: The Tao of Health (3 credits)
This course provides insight into Chinese healing techniques, medicine, meditation and Tao philosophy. Emphasis is on preventive medicine and health in daily life. The course also deals with the roots of health and healing, energy medicine, proper exercise, food and herbs. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 538: Rosicrucian Healing (3 credits)
Students will be introduced to the various healing methods of the Rose Cross Order which was formed in the 17th Century. The course includes a history of the order, herbal techniques, healing and natural cures, the significant aspect of touch and love in healing and the occult principles of health and healing. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 539: Auras and Chakras (3 credits)
This course offers an opportunity for the student to become a part of something bigger and more perfect than he/she could ever imagine - a world, a dimension, and universe intermingled with energy fields, magnetic forces, and unimaginable electromagnetic vibrations of light and sound. The course introduces the student to a new Era where humans are invited to use their creativity, love, passion, and mental ability constructively in making a better world for themselves and humanity as a whole. Let us, therefore, keep an open mind and heart in sharing a vision of a better potentiality. A potentiality which we each must activate through the reading of our Cosmic blueprint - life itself. [Instructor: To be assigned]

CAM 540: Program Planning for Complementary and Alternative Healthcare (3 credits)
Students who wish to pursue a concentration in the field of Complementary and Alternative Healthcare would benefit from strategically planning their program so that it follows guidelines that can enhance their integrity as a CAM healthcare professional. This course aims to support the nontraditional course work that is necessary for a CAM concentration with professional standards that have been set forth by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), as well as the core curriculum that serves the Allied Health professions and the U.S. Surgeon General toward acquiring licensing in many branches of the health careers. With this, the overall program plan is tailored to meet the student s interests and needs. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 541: Major Domains of Complementary and Alternative Healthcare & Research (3 credits)
Many professions, innovative programs and research initiatives are funded by Grants. In 1991, the National Institutes of Health established the Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM) to explore unconventional medical practices. The OAM has since been transformed into the NCCAM. Today the NCCAM has established major domains of practice in Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM). This course aims to familiarize students with the standards that are unfolding in the U.S. national effort to integrate CAM into it s present medical system and to include the understanding necessary to do research, and get funding for research in this area of study. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 542: Ayurveda I (3 credits)
Ayurveda is India s traditional system of medicine. Ayurvedic medicine is a comprehensive system of medicine that places equal emphasis on mind, body, and spirit, and strives to create or restore the innate harmony of the individual. This course provides the opportunity for students to investigate, in depth, the principles of ayurveda, from it s spiritual and cosmological background, to the full spectrum of ayurvedic anatomy and physiology including the biological humors (doshas), tissues (dhatus), systems (srtoas), organs and waste materials of the body. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 543: Ayurveda II (3 credits)
Beyond studies undertaken in AYURVEDA I, this course provides the opportunity for students to investigate, in depth, the principles of Ayurvedic constitutional analysis and the examination of disease, as it applies to Ayurvedic theory from physical to mental diagnosis. The diagnostic methods of pulse, tongue and abdomen, questioning and observation, including psychological factors, are covered. Prerequisite: Ayurveda I. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 544: Ayurveda III (3 credits)
Beyond studies undertaken in AYURVEDA I & II, this course provides the opportunity for students to investigate, in depth, the therapeutic methods of Ayurveda including dietary therapy, herbal therapy, Ayurvedic therapeutic approaches such as pancha karma, and the subtle healing modalities of aroma therapy, color therapy, mantra and healing sounds. Prerequisites: Ayurveda I and II. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 545: Introduction to Herbal Medicine (3 credits)
This course serves the purposes of offering an overview of the traditional systems and techniques used in herbal medicine, and provides the opportunity for students to investigate any of these systems in depth. In addition to special topics initiated by the learner, in this study we examine the Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western classification systems, their various traditional preparations and methods used in herbal medicine. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 546: Herbal Immune System Enhancement (3 credits)
This course provides students with a basic understanding of the immune system and focuses on how herbal interventions have been used to enhance immune responses in humans. In addition to special topics initiated by the learner, in this study we examine treatment for specific ailments and acute and chronic conditions including cancer, arthritis, asthma, diabetes, and heart disease. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 547: Herbal Internal Cleansing (3 credit)
Disorders in the process of converting food into living cells can make the difference between merely surviving or living with vitality. For this reason, internal cleansing is the primary step of many health maintenance or healing modalities. This course provides students with a basic understanding of the human digestive system and focuses on understanding the traditional and natural methods of internal cleansing. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 548:Introduction to Homeopathy (3 credits)
Homeopathic medicine is an unconventional Western system that is based on the principle that "like cures like." This course serves the purpose of offering an overview of homeopathy and covers it s origins, it s basic principles, the use of various homeopathic remedies, including compatibility with other therapies. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 549: Innovative and Unconventional Approaches to Psychotherapy (3 credits)
Many clinicians find it useful to have a collection of psychotherapeutic techniques available to them when working with individuals and groups. This course serves the purposes of offering an overview various innovative forms of counseling and psychotherapy and provides the opportunity to investigate any of them in depth. In addition to topics of interest initiated by the learner, the topics explored in this study include; ego-state therapies, archetypal psychotherapy, Taoism and counseling, transcendental counseling, psychodrama, feminist therapy, hakomi therapy, and meditative states of therapy. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 550:Mind-Body Interventions (3 credits)
Mind-body interventions employ a variety of techniques designed to facilitate the mind s capacity to affect bodily function and symptoms. This course serves the purposes of offering an overview of various mind/body interventions and provides the opportunity for students to investigate any mind/body intervention in depth. In addition to topics of interest initiated by the learner, the topics explored in this study include; biofeedback, relaxation techniques, meditation, imagery, behavioral interventions, hypnosis, the expressive and creative arts therapies, touch and energy healing, martial arts, and somatic therapies. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 551: Spiritual Health and Healing (3 credits)
The objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to explore the relationship between spirituality, health, and healing given perspectives from world religions. This course focuses on the physiological, neurological, and psychological effects of healing resulting from spirituality. In addition to topics of interest initiated by the learner, the topics explored in this study include; African, Buddhist, Jewish, Catholic, Islamic, Hispanic-Pentacostal, Christian Science, Nursing, Intercessory Prayer, Neurobiological aspects related to the placebo-effect, and the power of belief. [Instructor: Rosemary Cook]

CAM 555: Shamanism (3 credits)
This course offers readings and experiences in the practice of shamanism. Journal entries, an annotated bibliography, and a final 10-page paper will be required. [Instructor: Dr. Lisa Mertz]

CAM 560: Survey of Literature in Energy Medicine (3 credits)
Students will investigate available literature and learning resources in the field of Energy Medicine and prepare journal annotations. Students will prepare a scholarly paper reflecting upon the contributions the field of energy medicine has made to the general field of health and healing. [Instructor: Dr. Lisa Mertz]

CAM 590 Qualitative Research for Alternative Healthcare (3 credits)
This survey course offers an in-depth study of qualitative research methods. Participants survey historical and theoretical foundations of qualitative research, explore major qualitative research strategies, and build an understanding of the art and science of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting qualitative materials. The course provides background on applied qualitative research, the politics and ethics of qualitative inquiry, and the major paradigms that inform and influence qualitative research. [Instructor Dr. Lisa Mertz]

CAM 599: Inner Practicum and Transformational Practice (3 credits)
Master’s students must investigate core aspects of the discipline within the professional environment through close contact with practitioners and "real world" situations. Students should participate in the field study for a minimum of 150 contact hours. The field placement is expected to afford students appropriate practical hands on experience and in-depth knowledge of their areas of practice. Students must prepare a field study proposal according to University guidelines prior to undertaking the course. Under the supervision of assigned instructors, students will select from a range of personal development, growth, and transformative practices (e.g. meditative/contemplative, art/expressive, interpersonal/psychological, yoga, breathwork, bodywork, cultural expeditions, volunteer service, combinations of these, etc.) and document their experiences on life domains relevant to health, healing, and wellness. The student can choose to undergo these experiences in retreats, intensives, community services, home practices, social gatherings, external trainings, health and wellness centers, spas. Students complete a daily journal and prepare a scholarly paper summarizing their findings for the field study. [Instructor: To be assigned]

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Applied Psychology
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Akamai University is internationally accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC). The University has earned Premier status with ASIC for its commendable areas of operation. ASIC is an approved accrediting body for the purposes of compliance by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) is a member of the British Quality Foundation (BQF), sits on the Quality Standards Group of UK NARIC, and is one of a number of international accrediting bodies listed in the international directory by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) in the USA and is a member of the CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG).

Akamai University
187 Kino`ole Street
Hilo, Hawaii 96720 USA