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APPLIED INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Introduction
Program Audience
Degree Requirements
Primary Faculty
Course Descriptions
Transfer Credit from IT Professional Training and Certification

Welcome to the Applied Information Technology Program
Applied Information and Technology provides the education and training necessary to meet the goals and objectives of mid-career IT and computing professionals. Our programs are flexible but challenging, and they are personalized to effectively address your career needs. Program faculty members are dedicated to guiding you through an exciting and rewarding curriculum, which will open a new world of learning paradigms.

Applied Information and Technology at Akamai University provides the education and training necessary to design, implement, test, and utilize the hardware and software of digital computers and digital systems. The programs provide comprehensive and integrated studies of subjects in computer system architecture, computer networks, parallel and distributed computing, programming languages, Database systems, computer system modeling, algorithms, software engineering, project management and E-commerce technologies.

Learning should be interesting and rewarding. We welcome you to join us in exploring opportunities to enhance your professional career and collegiate experience. We wish you a happy journey to graduation.

Sincerely,
Niranjan Ray, Ph.D.
Chair, Information Technology Program

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PROGRAM AUDIENCE

The Applied Information Technology Program is designed to serve the needs of professionals in computer science, information systems, business and industry, distance education, health institutions, government and community-based organization.

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PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Master of Science in Applied Information Technology

Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

Course Descriptions

MASTER OF SCIENCE

Degree Requirements
Master's participants will complete a minimum of 36 credits above the baccalaureate degree including the thesis, as outlined below:

Academic Major (Required: 18 credits minimum)
Academic Minor (Required: 9 credits minimum)
Research Preparation (Required: 3 credits minimum)
EXM 880: Master's Comprehensive Examination (Required: noncredit)
RES 885: Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)
RES 890: Thesis (Required: 4 credits)
EXM 895: Oral Review of Thesis (Required: noncredit)

Course Descriptions

The Academic Major
Master's students must complete 18 graduate credits in core coursework comprising an academic major that are individualized to the professional needs of the student. These are the foundational competencies in theories, principles, and practices, and the historical, philosophical, and social-cultural implications of the discipline. These courses represent the core competencies and essential elements, which define your field of study and establish the underlying foundations upon which you may base your advanced professional development.

Required: 18 credits from among the following courses:

ITP 501: Data Modeling (3 credits)
ITP 502: Component Modeling and Design (3 credits)
ITP 503: Issues in Information Systems (3 credits)
ITP 504: Database Design (3 credits)
ITP 506: Information Systems Development (3 credits)
ITP 507: Effectiveness in Information Technology (3 credits)
ITP 508: eCommerce Management (3 credits)
ITP 510: Object-Oriented Modeling (3 credits)
ITP 511: Advanced Web Development (3 credits)
ITP 512: Wide Area Networks (3 credits)
ITP 513: Advanced Java (3 credits)
ITP 514: XML Technologies (3 credits)
ITP 515: .Net Architecture (3 credits)
ITP 516: Programming for .Net (3 credits)
ITP 517: Enterprise Java (3 credits)
ITP 518: Internet Transaction Processing and Security (3 credits)
ITP 519: Multimedia Applications and Networks (3 credits)
ITP 520: Human-Computer Interaction (3 credits)
ITP 522: Software Maintenance (3 credits)
ITP 523: Software Testing and Reliability (3 credits)
ITP 524: Systems Project Management (3 credits)
ITP 525: Software Tools (3 credits)
ITP 526: Usability Engineering (3 credits)
ITP 527: Large Scale System Design (3 credits)
ITP 528: Software Quality Management (3 credits)
ITP 529: Information Technologies in Education (3 credits)
ITP 530: Education and Electronic Commerce (3 credits)
ITP 531: Human Factors in Information Systems (3 credits)
ITP 532: Computer Systems Security (3 credits)
ITP 533: Database Systems (3 credits)
ITP 534: Internet Technology (3 credits)
ITP 535: Information Systems Management (3 credits)
ITP 537: Statistical Modeling (3 credits)
ITP 538: Technology-based Educational Delivery Modes (3 credits)
ITP 539: Managing Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 540: Teaching and Learning in Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 541: Media, Texts and Technologies in Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 542: Critical Issues in Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 543: Distance Education Institutions (3 credits)
ITP 544: Curriculum and Instruction in Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 545: Distance Education and the Higher Education Bureaucracy (3 credits)
ITP 546: Marketing Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 547: Management Information Systems (3 credits)
ITP 548: Computer Resources and Information Management (3 credits)
ITP 549: Internet Management Applications (3 credits)
ITP 550: Intelligent Systems (3 credits)
ITP 551: Information Systems Applications (3 credits)
ITP 552: Systems Analysis and Software Engineering (3 credits)
ITP 554: Applied Business Statistics (3 credits)
ITP 555: Quantitative Methods (3 credits)
ITP 556: Experimental Design (3 credits)
ITP 557: Distributed Systems (3 credits)
ITP 558: Networking and Telecommunication Management (3 credits)
ITP 559: Object Oriented Analysis and Design (3 credits)
ITP 560: Data Warehousing (3 credits)
ITP 561: International Management (3 credits)
ITP 562: Financial Management (3 credits)
ITP 563: International Financial Management (3 credits)
ITP 564: Independent Studies in Management Technologies (3 credits)
ITP 565: Psychology and E-Learning (3 credits)
ITP 566: Applying Adult Learning Models to the Online Environment (3 credits)
ITP 567: Synchronous Instructional Development for Educators (3 credits)
ITP 568: Asynchronous Instructional Development for Educators (3 credits)
ITP 569: Creating the Online Classroom (3 credits)
ITP 577: Distributed Systems (3 credits)
ITP 579: Networking and Telecommunication Management (3 credits)
ITP 581: Independent Studies in Management Technologies (3 credits)
ITP 583: Set Theory for Computer Science (3 credits)
ITP 585: Modern Logic (3 credits)

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The Academic Minor
Master's students completing the degree by coursework, also complete coursework in an academic minor comprising at least 9 credits. The primary mentor guides the student in the selection of this coursework. The academic minor may include additional studies in the major field or another appropriate field of study. The minor may also be interdisciplinary in nature.

Research Preparation
Master’s students must pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their final projects (thesis or major project in lieu of thesis). At least three semester credits of research preparation coursework is required and this might focus upon quantitative and qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques, especially subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each student’s proposed project. Through this requirement, students learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study. They should learn to present an effective scholarly review of the academic literature and implement quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating academic issues.

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Comprehensive Examination
Once the student has completed the coursework elements of the degree, they schedule the Comprehensive Examination. The primary mentor and a faculty member representing the minor field of study conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

Thesis Proposal
Master's students are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to the concept for research under the direction of the primary mentor and following the guidelines provided by the University.

Thesis Project
Following approval of the thesis proposal, the student will begin the research project. The thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is approved, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be the original work of the student and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement of the professional field.

The thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of the thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If the thesis takes the form of a major scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

Review of Thesis
Once the students have prepared the thesis manuscript, they will be asked to schedule the formal review process. The primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area will conduct the formal physical review of the thesis manuscript and the oral review of thesis.

The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to the underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and the presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The oral examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of the thesis. The faculty reviewers explore issues related to the thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the thesis review process is a set of final expectations directing the student through the remaining tasks for completing the thesis manuscript. Once the final manuscript is approved, the student will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later ship the bound thesis to the University for permanent archival storage.

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DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

Students pursuing the Doctor of Philosophy must complete 48 hours of graduate credit above the Master's degree from the following courses. This includes 36 credits in subject matter coursework in addition to the Dissertation Proposal (4 credits) and Dissertation Research (8 credits). Programs may be individualized to the needs and interests of the students, under the guidance of the assigned faculty advisor.

Degree Requirements:

Academic Major (Required: 18 credits minimum)
Academic Minor (Required: 12 credits minimum)
Research Preparation (Required: 6 credits minimum)
EXM 980: Comprehensive Examination (Required: noncredit)
RES 985: Dissertation Proposal (Required: 4 credits)
RES 990: Dissertation Project (Required: 8 credits)
EXM 995: Oral Review of Dissertation(Required: noncredit)

Course Descriptions

Academic Major

Doctoral students complete 18 graduate credits in core coursework comprising an academic major that are individualized to the professional needs of the student. These are the foundational competencies in theories, principles, and practices, and the historical, philosophical, and social-cultural implications of the discipline. These courses represent the core competencies and essential elements, which define your field of study and establish the underlying foundations upon which you may base your advanced professional development.

Required: 18 credits from among the following courses:

ITP 501: Data Modeling (3 credits)
ITP 502: Component Modeling and Design (3 credits)
ITP 503: Issues in Information Systems (3 credits)
ITP 504: Database Design (3 credits)
ITP 506: Information Systems Development (3 credits)
ITP 507: Effectiveness in Information Technology (3 credits)
ITP 508: eCommerce Management (3 credits)
ITP 510: Object-Oriented Modeling (3 credits)
ITP 511: Advanced Web Development (3 credits)
ITP 512: Wide Area Networks (3 credits)
ITP 513: Advanced Java (3 credits)
ITP 514: XML Technologies (3 credits)
ITP 515: .Net Architecture (3 credits)
ITP 516: Programming for .Net (3 credits)
ITP 517: Enterprise Java (3 credits)
ITP 518: Internet Transaction Processing and Security (3 credits)
ITP 519: Multimedia Applications and Networks (3 credits)
ITP 520: Human-Computer Interaction (3 credits)
ITP 522: Software Maintenance (3 credits)
ITP 523: Software Testing and Reliability (3 credits)
ITP 524: Systems Project Management (3 credits)
ITP 525: Software Tools (3 credits)
ITP 526: Usability Engineering (3 credits)
ITP 527: Large Scale System Design (3 credits)
ITP 528: Software Quality Management (3 credits)
ITP 529: Information Technologies in Education (3 credits)
ITP 530: Education and Electronic Commerce (3 credits)
ITP 531: Human Factors in Information Systems (3 credits)
ITP 532: Computer Systems Security (3 credits)
ITP 533: Database Systems (3 credits)
ITP 534: Internet Technology (3 credits)
ITP 535: Information Systems Management (3 credits)
ITP 537: Statistical Modeling (3 credits)
ITP 538: Technology-based Educational Delivery Modes (3 credits)
ITP 539: Managing Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 540: Teaching and Learning in Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 541: Media, Texts and Technologies in Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 542: Critical Issues in Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 543: Distance Education Institutions (3 credits)
ITP 544: Curriculum and Instruction in Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 545: Distance Education and the Higher Education Bureaucracy (3 credits)
ITP 546: Marketing Distance Education (3 credits)
ITP 547: Management Information Systems (3 credits)
ITP 548: Computer Resources and Information Management (3 credits)
ITP 549: Internet Management Applications (3 credits)
ITP 550: Intelligent Systems (3 credits)
ITP 551: Information Systems Applications (3 credits)
ITP 552: Systems Analysis and Software Engineering (3 credits)
ITP 554: Applied Business Statistics (3 credits)
ITP 555: Quantitative Methods (3 credits)
ITP 556: Experimental Design (3 credits)
ITP 557: Distributed Systems (3 credits)
ITP 558: Networking and Telecommunication Management (3 credits)
ITP 559: Object Oriented Analysis and Design (3 credits)
ITP 560: Data Warehousing (3 credits)
ITP 561: International Management (3 credits)
ITP 562: Financial Management (3 credits)
ITP 563: International Financial Management (3 credits)
ITP 564: Independent Studies in Management Technologies (3 credits)
ITP 565: Psychology and E-Learning (3 credits)
ITP 566: Applying Adult Learning Models to the Online Environment (3 credits)
ITP 567: Synchronous Instructional Development for Educators (3 credits)
ITP 568: Asynchronous Instructional Development for Educators (3 credits)
ITP 569: Creating the Online Classroom (3 credits)
ITP 577: Distributed Systems (3 credits)
ITP 579: Networking and Telecommunication Management (3 credits)
ITP 581: Independent Studies in Management Technologies (3 credits)
ITP 583: Set Theory for Computer Science (3 credits)
ITP 585: Modern Logic (3 credits)

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The Academic Minor
Doctoral students completing the degree by coursework, also complete coursework comprising a 12 credit academic minor. The primary mentor guides the student in the selection of this coursework. The academic minor may include additional studies in the major field or another appropriate field of study. The minor may also be interdisciplinary in nature.

Research Preparation
Doctoral students must pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their final projects (dissertation). At least six semester credits of research preparation coursework are required. This coursework might focus upon quantitative and qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques including subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each student’s proposed project. Through this requirement, students learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study. They should learn to present an effective scholarly review of the academic literature and implement quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating academic issues.

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Comprehensive Examination
Once the student has completed the coursework elements of the degree, they will schedule the Comprehensive Examination. The primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area conduct the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Student responses are expected to draw from the academic competencies of the program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

Dissertation Proposal
Doctoral students are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to your concept for research under the direction of your primary mentor and following the guidelines provided by the University.

Dissertation Project
Following approval of the dissertation proposal, the student will begin the research project. The dissertation may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the dissertation is approved, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be the original work of the student and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement to the professional field.

The dissertation research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of the dissertation manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 125 double spaced, typewritten pages. If the dissertation takes the form of a scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

Review of Dissertation
Once the students have prepared the dissertation manuscript, they will be asked to schedule the formal review process. The primary mentor and two faculty members representing the secondary academic area and the field of research will conduct the formal physical review of the dissertation manuscript and the oral review of dissertation.

The physical review of the manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to your underlying review of the literature, the dissertation methodology, the mechanics of your project, and your presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The oral examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of the dissertation. The faculty reviewers explore the issues related to the dissertation including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the dissertation review process is a set of final expectations directing the student through the remaining tasks for completing the dissertation manuscript. Once the final manuscript is approved, the student will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later arrange for the bound dissertation to be shipped to the University for permanent archival storage.

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PRIMARY FACULTY

Niranjan Ray, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., Ph.D. (Engineering)
Senior Program Leader

Harvey Menden, Ph.D.
Business Center Director

Joseph Saaty, Ph.D.

Somchet Bunditjaroenpun, Ph.D.

Margaret Morabito, Ph.D.

Seamus Phan, Ph.D.

Richard K. Tweneboah, Ph.D.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ITP 501: Data Modeling (3 credits)
This subject is concerned with information modeling for both requirements specification and database design. The object-role method of conceptual modeling is used. Students learn how to create object-role models and how to derive other forms of conceptual and database models from them.

ITP 502: Component Modeling and Design (3 credits)
This subject examines methods currently used to model and specify the behavior of information systems, with a focus on the development of systems from re-usable components.

ITP 503: Issues in Information Systems (3 credits)
This subject encourages students to critically appraise state of the art developments and evaluate them for relevance to their own environment. Students will examine recent trends and their impact on business and management and the anticipated directions within the computer industry.

ITP 504: Database Design (3 credits)
This subject examines the physical design and implementation issues in local and distributed databases.

ITP 506: Information Systems Development (3 credits)
As the convergence of object-oriented and relational databases continues, in the form of object-relational database management systems, database designers are faced with more complex design choices than before. This project-based subject offers students the opportunity to investigate the capabilities of modern database products and to apply suitable design methods.

ITP 507: Effectiveness in Information Technology (3 credits)
This subject introduces students to the complexities and considerations associated with making effective investments in IT. Students are exposed to both financial and strategic perspectives in assessing the effectiveness of an organizational IT portfolio.

ITP 508: eCommerce Management (3 credits)
This advanced unit will explore the current practices and the fundamental theories pertaining to electronic commerce. The subject examines the ramifications of electronic commerce and how it is best managed within the modern organization.

ITP 510: Object-Oriented Modeling (3 credits)
This subject concentrates on object-oriented analysis, and on processes for developing object-oriented systems. It includes use of the UML language.

ITP 511: Advanced Web Development (3 credits)
This subject explores the technical issues relating to both client side and serve side web development including style sheets, dynamic HTML, CGI scripting and ASP development. Interface design and development methodologies are also addressed.

ITP 512: Wide Area Networks (3 credits)
(Prerequisite: A university level data communications subject) In this subject MAN and WAN technologies currently in use such as DQDB, FDDI and SDH/SONET are reviewed and the protocols of Internet are studied in detail. Emphasis is placed on TCP/IP protocol suite, routing in the Internet, RIP and OSPF, Internet multicasting, DNS, Internet security and firewall design. New developments such as IP over ATM and next generation Internet are also covered.

ITP 513: Advanced Java (3 credits)
This course examines the architecture, performance and human computer interface of Java Language. Topics include the JVM, performance, threads, serialization, Java Beans, Swing and the Graphics 2D class libraries.

ITP 514: XML Technologies (3 credits)
The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a popular language for the World Wide Web and Electronic Commerce. Development of resources using XML and various areas applying XML are examined.

ITP 515: .Net Architecture and Programming (3 credits)
This course examines the architectural design of Microsoft’s .NET Framework. Topics include and understanding of how application developers create Web services that can be combined into stateless, distributed software systems. Topics also explore the implementation of local and distributed applications using VB.NET and introduces the C# programming language.

ITP 517: Enterprise Java (3 credits)
This subject focuses on the development of networked database applications using Java. In particular, there will be substantial investigation of the development of databases on the web.

ITP 518: Internet Transaction Processing and Security (3 credits)
Covering technologies such as COM, OLE, ActiveX, DCOM, and CORBA, this subject gives a hands-on approach to distributed programming. Practical work will be carried out using CORBA and Java giving students a deeper understanding of the issues facing distributed system building.

ITP 519: Multimedia Applications and Networks (3 credits)
This subject examines the media, hardware, software, networks and applications relevant to the use of multimedia over the Internet. Practical skills are developed in conjunction with a theoretical study of methodology and interface issues. Students learn a variety of design techniques used to manipulate digital images using software tools and explore how to integrate these images with other media components. Topics explore the tools currently available to incorporate video, audio and other media components into educationally related websites.

ITP 520: Human-Computer Interaction (3 credits)
This subject concentrates on the design of highly usable interactive systems. Key areas covered include usability testing and evaluation, user modeling and profiling, participative design techniques and visual interface design.

ITP 522: Software Maintenance (3 credits)
This subject examines corrective and enhancement maintenance of existing software systems involving conceptual and process issues associated with software maintenance.

ITP 523: Software Testing and Reliability (3 credits)
This subject introduces students to the concepts and methodologies of software testing and reliability. The subject will cover selection of test cases, program instrumentation, data flow analysis, domain testing strategy, mutation analysis, basics of reliability theory and reliability modeling.

ITP 524: Systems Project Management (3 credits)
This course examines effective management of information system projects. Topics explore project development and information systems, project planning and controlling, scheduling, application software project development, costing, organization development, documentation, evaluation, and staffing and includes emphases upon hardware, software, networks, and system support.

ITP 525: Software Tools (3 credits)
The aim of this subject is to examine theoretical and practical issues relating to the use of tools in software development. The subject will include practical experience with tools for analysis and design, automated testing tools, configuration management tools and performance testing and analysis tools.

ITP 526: Usability Engineering (3 credits)
This subject explores a range of usability issues from a software engineering perspective including task analysis; user needs analysis methods and tools, formal approaches and visualization.

ITP 527: Large Scale System Design (3 credits)
To facilitate an in-depth study of current approaches and techniques for large-scale system design, with a special focus on requirements and software architectures. The course will cover requirements specification, validation of requirements, requirements management, history and significance of architectures, architectural styles and patterns, architectures and frameworks and architectural design.

ITP 528: Software Quality Management (3 credits)
The development of high quality software requires close attention to the process used. In this subject, key areas of the software process are studied in detail: for example, software quality assurance, software process improvement and metrics

ITP 529: Information Technologies in Education (3 credits)
This course explores the nature and use of new information technologies in education and examines how converging technologies and globalization are affecting the nature of schools, impacting on the curriculum, and providing teachers with new tools and learning environments to explore. Topics address the development of interactive curriculum materials, the application of educational software packages to different curriculum areas and the examination of policy and competency issues for teachers and students. Students may also review implementation strategies and issues, models and approaches to effective integration, the relevance of various learning theories to the use and nature of curriculum software to support particular curriculum areas and educational initiatives.

ITP 530: Education and Electronic Commerce (3 credits)
This course reviews some of the more advanced features of electronic commerce as applied to the field of education. Topics cover control and security issues, use of Internet and Intranet resources, financial management and database systems. Topics might also include the national and international framework for electronic commerce, electronic contracting, cyber-banking and internet payment systems, electronic "currency" and network money, share trading and the digital prospectus, legal authentication and digital signature security in electronic commerce, consumer protection, internet taxation issues and revenue implications, privacy laws, intellectual property issues for and some jurisdictional conundrums and solutions.

ITP 531: Human Factors in Information Systems (3 credits)
This course explores the essential roles of the technical and administrative professional in the design, implementation and operation of information systems for the educational, business or human service arena. Topics include an analysis of the role of people in information systems from a cognitive psychology perspective particularly with respect to the effect of individual differences on systems and their successful management. The course introduces the nature, structure and development of knowledge in the information systems arena as applied to business and finance issues. Topics help students to find, comprehend, organize, and evaluate critically research-based knowledge associated with information systems.

ITP 532: Computer Systems Security (3 credits)
This course explores the principles and techniques of network security and management. Topics investigate security attacks, security policies, auditing, intrusion detection, key management, network security, and database security. Topics might also include encryption, public-key cryptology, cryptographic algorithms, and authentication and digital signatures and typical network security applications.

ITP 533: Database Systems (3 credits)
This course presents the principles and practices of designing and using relational database management systems. Students pursue the concepts of fundamental data structures, data modeling and system implementation. Students design and implement a database system for a real of imagined educational or business environment using a relational database management system of their choosing. Particular attention will be paid to transaction analysis, concurrency control, security and integrity, and query optimization in database systems.

ITP 534: Internet Technology (3 credits)
This course explores the area of interactive Internet application design and construction. The student is shown how to build practical websites using a range of simple tools that require very little programming knowledge. Students will study the simple scripting language, JavaScript, and will become proficient in using a range of software tools for generating multimedia and interactive web page components.

ITP 535: Information Systems for Management (3 credits)
This course covers a variety of models and computer-based tools available to assist management decision-making. Topics include simulation, risk analysis, sensitivity analysis, decision theory, data analysis and retrieval and data mining. Students investigate management and organizational issues associated with information systems. Topics focus on business requirements for data, information and knowledge and examine organizational issues involved in meeting those requirements.

ITP 537: Statistical Modeling (3 credits)
This subject provides a detailed understanding of the application of the statistical modeling methods in common use with emphasis on applications in computing, education, business, and psychology. Traditional and matrix approaches to multiple regression, correlation and analysis of variance are presented as is an overall strategy for fitting multiple linear regression models to data using statistical applications packages. Multivariate, non-linear, non-parametric methods and the design of experiments are introduced. The course provides students with skills in developing Excel models for a range of educational and business uses.

ITP 538: Technology-based Educational Delivery Modes (3 credits)
This course is an examination of distance technologies available for educational use. Students are introduced to automation systems for delivering synchronous (near-real time) and static (non-real time) distance education. Students may explore and apply delivery modes that allow dynamic student-instructor interaction including text-only, voice and video teleconferences over the Internet. Topic may also cover application of static delivery modes including Internet pages, email, newsgroups and list servers and a variety of other electronic venues. Students should be able to assess the distance educational needs of a specific population of learners and plan the appropriate delivery model.

ITP 539: Managing Distance Education (3 credit)
The course explores options for development of the student’s professional competencies for managing people, finances, program development and services in distance education institutions. A variety of methods of distance education are explored and their effectiveness reviewed.

ITP 540: Teaching and Learning in Distance Education (3 credits)
This course aims to develop an understanding of the philosophical issues behind teaching and learning and to explore the world of the learners in open and distance education. Topics are designed to stimulate reflection and discussion among distance education practitioners and students are expected to participate in a variety of online distance education discussion groups.

ITP 541: Media, Texts and Technologies in Distance Education (3 credits)
Students develop an understanding of the theoretical framework and practical implementation of the use of media, text and technology in open and distance education. Topics review the psychological, sociological and pedagogic issues involved in distance education and explore a range of applications and their impact on students' learning at a distance.

ITP 542: Critical Issues in Distance Education (3 credits)
Students are introduced to the critical issues in distance education. Topics examine educational technology, student autonomy, sufficiency of student services, effectiveness of student evaluation, access and equity, and applications within developing nations.

ITP 543: Distance Education Institutions (3 credits)
Students examine the philosophy, mission, goals, structures and outcome objectives of distance learning institutions. Field research and case studies are used to identify differing structures of distance learning organizations. Students compare and contrast these differing structures with the needs of the institutions for which they were designed.

ITP 544: Curriculum and Instruction in Distance Education (3 credits)
Students explore the theories of curriculum and instruction and policy making relative to the design of a distance-learning program. Students examine the differences in delivery techniques utilized by educators to effectively deliver curriculum materials via distance technology and explore the limitations, assumptions, and misconceptions of distance education as a delivery mode. Students compare and contrast program curricula and instructional delivery models of selected case study models.

ITP 545: Distance Education and the Higher Education Bureaucracy (3 credits)
This course examines the issues and history of governmental regulation of distance education institutions in the United States. Topics examine existing accrediting bodies, investigate the forms of accreditation, options and limitations for non-traditional and distance education institutions.

ITP 546: Marketing Distance Education (3 credits)
Students learn to determine the optimum marketing strategy for distance education using current and emerging technologies and media. Topics assist students in developing an effective distance education-marketing plan including the market surveys, advertising, promotion, problem resolution, pricing, and distribution. Students are expected to build a sample website to display effective marketing techniques.

ITP 547: Management Information Systems (3 credits)
This is a course in managing information systems in an organization. This course provides an overview of information systems, their role in organizations, and the relation of information systems to the objectives and structure of an organization. Human aspects, models of systems, and general theory of systems are discussed. Applications are considered, including budgeting, planning, decision-support systems, and microcomputer applications.

ITP 548: Computer Resources and Information Management (3 credits)
This is a course in computer resources and information management. This course introduces the student to the tools for managing information and computer resources. Students examine the concepts of business applications, systems management, project management, systems analysis and design, network and telecommunications, and database management.

ITP 549: Internet Management Applications (3 credits)
This is a course about Internet management. In this course the student will examine a number of topics related to the use of the Internet for management and organizational systems. Among the topics are electronic commerce, search engines and search strategies, principles of web page design and use, and extranets and intranets for organizational communication. Future developments will be considered.

ITP 550: Intelligent Systems (3 credits)
This is a course about the automated intelligent systems used in management science. This course provides the student with a background in artificial intelligence and expert systems. Some of the topics addressed are definitions of expert systems and artificial intelligence as well as the differences between the two systems. Other topics include the factors to consider when constructing expert systems, the building of expert systems, reasoning under certainty, simulation, and reasoning under uncertainty.

ITP 551: Information Systems Applications (3 credits)
This course is about the effects of information systems on organizations. This course is concerned with the impact of the computer on the managerial process. Students examine the methods for evaluating and selecting business applications for computerization in the business environment. The course focuses on information and data processing, accounting systems, marketing management information systems, decision support systems, and advanced management systems.

ITP 552: Systems Analysis and Software Engineering (3 credits)
This is a course on the new approach to systems analysis. Some of the topics include the areas of computer technology; systems analysis, systems design, and software application construction are combined to aid the student with a detailed analysis construction of a large-scale application. The course includes the formalization of the information system's logical and physical analysis and design process. The concept of computer aided software engineering (CASE) tool is introduced.

ITP 554: Applied Business Statistics (3 credits)
This is a course on business statistics. The student is introduced to the basic statistics, which are used in business organizations. Some of the topics, which are included, are data presentation, averages, variations, graphs, discrete and continuous distributions, normal and Student distributions, F distribution, hypothesis testing and experimental design.

ITP 555: Quantitative Methods (3 credits)
This is a course on some of the common quantitative methods used in business. Topics include optimization, linear programming, reasoning with certainty and uncertainty, probability theory, Bayesian analysis, statistical methods, and simulation. The emphasis is on applications to business problems.

ITP 556: Experimental Design (3 credits)
This is a course on experimental designs for business. Some of the topics include probability theory, statistics, parameters, small sample designs, large sample designs, double blind designs, full factorial designs, half factorial designs, Taguchi methods, and sequential designs.

ITP 557: Distributed Systems (3 credits)
This is a course on distributed systems. Students will examine the fundamentals of computer information systems to include computer hardware. Some of the topics include multiprocessing, multitasking, synchronization, replication, middleware, multi-user operating systems, network operating systems, and user interfaces. Emphasis will be on distributed information systems.

ITP 558: Networking and Telecommunication Management (3 credits)
This is a course on networking and telecommunications management. Some of the topics include the various segments of the telecommunication networks and how these relate to the total system. The segments include analog and digital systems, cable systems, trunking, switching systems, microwave systems, satellites, voice grade, customer premise, special circuits, toll systems, and new technology.

ITP 559: Object Oriented Analysis and Design (3 credits)
This is a course on object oriented analysis and design. Some of the topics will include the universal modeling language (UML), object modeling technique (OMT), classes, objects, instantiation, polymorphism, encapsulation, and inheritance. Languages discussed include C++, SMALLTALK, and JAVA. The emphasis will be on development for medium, large, and distributed systems.

ITP 560: Data Warehousing (3 credits)
This is a course on one of the latest data management techniques, data warehousing. Topics include knowledge based systems, data marketing, data storage, user interface, hardware, software, and data management. New technology will be included.

ITP 561: International Management (3 credits)
This is a course in international business management. Some of the topics are the language of international business, major political and economic systems, languages and cultures, differences in telecommunications, power, banking, roadway infrastructures and their effect on business, software, and hardware used in information systems. The emphasis will be on the effects of differences on management strategies used in management information systems.

ITP 562: Financial Management (3 credits)
This is a course in financial management. Topics in this course include strategic cost and international financial management, implementing economic value added (EVA) performance-based reward systems, business process reengineering, business turnaround and ethics in financial management. The emphasis will be on practical examples.

ITP 563: International Financial Management (3 credits)
This is a course in international financial management. Some of the topics covered are international currency and banking, major international financial laws, risks associated with financial transactions, property rights of nonresident organizations, international accounting, political and social risks. The emphasis will be on problem solving and how one manages risks.

ITP 564: Independent Studies in Management Technologies (3 credits)
This course is available to all students with the permission of the instructor and mentor. This course is provided to the student to explore new concepts in management science and technology. The topics may come from a broad range of possibilities to include job related subjects. The student is required to do independent research and study in the chosen area.

ITP 565: Psychology and E-Learning (3 credits)
This course focuses on an examination of how the Internet affects our definition of who we are and our communication and learning. Topics cover the personal relationship aspects involved in e-learning. Students will look at the nature of adult learning-at-distance, cross-cultural considerations, and the effectiveness of online learning in their field of study. Critical evaluative papers will be required.

ITP 566: Applying Adult Learning Models to the Online Environment (3 credits)
This course presents an overview of primary adult learning models and implications of their effective use in the online environment. Theories are selectively critiqued theoretically, empirically, practically, and ideologically. Teacher-centered versus learner-centered theory will be discussed. Students will explore variables influencing the effectiveness of teaching methods and gain a critical understanding of psychological factors affecting the online learning environment. Analytical papers and field of study case will be required.

ITP 567: Synchronous Instructional Development for Educators (3 credits)
Real-time, instructor-led e-learning leverages the Internet to improve education and training efficiency and effectiveness. This course explores the major concepts for creating scalable, systematic, and sustainable live instructional programs. Theory of interaction will be researched. Participants will study the foundations, technological requirements, and instructional techniques needed for successful online live instructional delivery. Papers and a practical field project are required.

ITP 568: Asynchronous Instructional Development for Educators (3 credits)
This course explores the major concepts for creating scalable, systematic and sustainable e-learning programs. Participants will study the foundations, technological requirements, and instructional techniques needed for successful online content development. . Students will become familiar with instructional uses of various delivery environments such as chat rooms, bulletin boards, classroom applications and email systems. Papers and practical field projects are required.

ITP 569: Creating the Online Classroom (3 credits)
This course explores the role of distance learning in today’s education and training environments. Topics include structural differences in distance learning programs, benefits of online learning, startup factors, marketing issues, technological issues, future trends, and international education considerations. Principles for effective distance learning will be examined. Students will develop a project applicable to their field of study.

ITP 577: Distributed Systems (3 credits)
This is a course on distributed systems. Students will examine the fundamentals of computer information systems to include computer hardware. Some of the topics include multiprocessing, multitasking, synchronization, replication, middleware, multi-user operating systems, network operating systems, and user interfaces. Emphasis will be on distributed information systems.

ITP 579: Networking and Telecommunication Management (3 credits)
This is a course on networking and telecommunications management. Some of the topics include the various segments of the telecommunication networks and how these relate to the total system. The segments include analog and digital systems, cable systems, trunking, switching systems, microwave systems, satellites, voice grade, customer premise, special circuits, toll systems, and new technology.

ITP 581: Independent Studies in Management Technologies (3 credits)
This course is available to all students with the permission of the instructor and mentor. This course is provided to the student to explore new concepts in management science and technology. The topics may come from a broad range of possibilities to include job-related subjects. The student is required to do independent research and study in the chosen area.

ITP 583: Set Theory for Computer Science (3 credits)
This is a course in set theory. Some of the topics included in this course are the relationship between logic and a computer, Cantor's theorem, the numbering systems used in a computer in relationship to the numbering systems used in mathematics, groups, rings, fields, zero divisors and non-associative algebra. Topics also include intuitive set theory, inclusion, operations on sets, algebra of sets, Boolean algebra, relations, equivalence relations, cardinality, infinite sets, functions, composition and inversion of functions, ordering relations, and applications to numbering systems.

ITP 585: Modern Logic (3 credits)
This is a course in modern applied logic such as we use in computer science and mathematics. It is designed to provide a student with a background into the foundations of logic and concomitant problems such as those associated with Goedel's Theorem, Propositional Logic, Quantifiers, Truth and Models, First Order Theories, Completeness and consistency, derived rules, theories with equality, Formal Number Theory, Turing's Theorem, computable functions, arithmetization and Godel's Incompleteness Theorem.

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TRANSFER CREDIT FOR TRAINING AND CERTIFICATIONS

Akamai University offers credit transfer for advanced level non-college professional training in Computing and Information Technology. Akamai honors the college credit recommendations of the American Council on Education and certifications issued to IT and computing professionals by recognized professional awarding bodies worldwide. Credit is applicable, whether the training or certification was previously completed or to be completed as part of the Akamai degree program.

ACE Center for Lifelong Learning
College Credit Recommendation Service

ACE has reviewed thousands of training courses for Fortune 500 corporations, associations, labor unions, government agencies, schools, and training suppliers.

Cisco Systems Career Certifications
Cisco offers three levels of general certification representing increasing levels of expertise: Associate, Professional, and Expert (CCIE). Different tracks across these levels align with varying career needs. A variety of focused Cisco Qualified Specialist certifications are available as well to show knowledge in specific technologies, solutions or job roles.

Microsoft Certifications
Microsoft certifications represent a rich and varied spectrum of job roles and responsibilities and Microsoft credentials provides objective validation of the ability to successfully perform critical IT functions. Embraced by industry professionals worldwide, Microsoft certification remains one of the most effective ways to reach long-term career goals, and is a surefire way for companies to develop and retain valuable IT staff.

Institute for Certification of Computing Professionals
The ICCP was established to credential the highest level of professional for the following professions: Systems Analysts, Computer Scientists, Computer Programmers, Database Administrators, Business Analysts, Network Administrators, Computer Software Engineers, Information Technology Managers, Chief Information/Technology Officers, Computer Security Analysts, Telecommunications Analysts, Business Intelligence Professionals, Data Management Professionals,IS/ IT Consultants.

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Akamai University is internationally accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC). The University has earned Premier status with ASIC for its commendable areas of operation. ASIC is an approved accrediting body for the purposes of compliance by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) is a member of the British Quality Foundation (BQF), sits on the Quality Standards Group of UK NARIC, and is one of a number of international accrediting bodies listed in the international directory by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) in the USA and is a member of the CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG).

Akamai University
187 Kino`ole Street
Hilo, Hawaii 96720 USA