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Center-PH


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION

Introduction
Program Audience
Entry Requirements
Degree Requirements
Credit Equivalency Assessment
Program Faculty
Course Descriptions

INTRODUCTION
The community health field gives health care practitioners the opportunity to work within their own community to develop and teach health and wellness programs for all age groups. Akamai graduates in Community Health Education have the opportunity to augment their current health profession with skills and tools to provide educational programs in their field as well as explore other educational opportunities in their community. The healthcare professions give practitioners a good education in their field as far as taking care of illness goes. What is needed in this modern age is an added focus on health and wellness to prevent illness and disease. With people living so much longer the field of community health education will continue to expand.

The community has traditionally been seen as a geographical entity with specific boundaries. For the purposes of our work we will add that community also refers to a group of people who have common characteristics like location, race, sex, occupation, ethnicity, particular problems or some type of bond.

Kind regards,

Kenneth Brownson, Ed.D. Program Director

PROGRAM AUDIENCE
This is a degree completion program for certified and registered healthcare professionals. Graduates would work within their local community. Activities with which graduates might be involved include:

  • Teaching health and wellness programs at organizations within the community (YMCA/YWCA, churches, etc).
  • Develop and/or work at wellness programs in local companies.
  • Develop and teach health and wellness programs at community centers or through the school district for both students and adults.
  • Develop and teach sexuality programs in the school district or community organizations.
  • Develop wellness workshops at senior centers.
  • Patient and staff education at hospitals or healthcare organizations.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
As prerequisites for admittance to the Bachelor of Science in Community Health Education, applicants should have completed at minimum of two full years of college level study, a minimum of 60 semester credits, or an Associate's level credential. Effective applicants are healthcare professionals certified or registered in their field. Candidates should be graduates of a recognized 1-3 year training program offered through a technical institute, hospital, or community college. Some of the appropriate fields of preparation would include: nursing, respiratory therapy, medical laboratory, radiology, mental health, nutrition, medical information, and related fields of health. Applicants should have at least 5 years professional experience.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Participants in the Bachelor of Science in Community Health Education must complete a minimum of 120 semester credits. Participants that wish to complete a program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Professional Studies (or Bachelor of Arts in Professional Studies) must have completed a series of studies through which significant scholarly literature has been explored, for which the student is examined and for which scholarly papers have been prepared. Within these courses, the academic content should be taken to a significant depth and progressively developed and integrated as the basis for advanced study. As a Bachelor's student, participants are expected to acquire a coherent body of knowledge in a chosen discipline, which emphasizes the underlying theories, principles, and practices and associated problem-solving techniques. Participants are expected to develop the academic skills and competencies necessary to understand and evaluate the effectiveness of new information and research, and present mature academic arguments through scholarly presentations with referencing from a range of sources. Participants must demonstrate the ability to integrate scholarly learning with knowledge and techniques learned within the career environment.

Bachelor of Science in Community Health Education (120 credits minimum)

General Education (30 credits)
The Academic Major (18 cred1ts)
Senior Project (15 credits)
Final Examination (6 credits)
Course Electives (as required)

GENERAL EDUCATION
Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Community health Education must demonstrate completion of a total of 30 semester credits in general education competencies, including at least six credits in physical sciences and mathematics, the social sciences, and arts and humanities. The general education requirements assure students develop an understanding and appreciation of the social and culture differences and interdependency of the global community, and build an awareness of themselves as spiritual, social, and biological beings. Available General Education course options

Physical Sciences and Mathematics (6 credits minimum)
Through this competency, students build an understanding the physical environment. Courses from the following fields help fulfill this requirement: environmental science, health, nutrition and fitness, and other physical and biological sciences, mathematics, algebra, geometry, accounting, personal finance, computer science, statistics, or financial management.

History and Social Sciences (6 credits minimum)
Through this competency, students build an understanding of human culture. Courses from the following fields help fulfill this requirement: history, government, civilization, political science, human development, economics, business studies, administration, psychology, sociology, education, anthropology and other related subjects.

Arts and Humanities (6 credits minimum)
Through this competency, students build an understanding of effective communication. Courses from the following fields help fulfill this requirement: language studies, composition, literature, creative writing, music, philosophy, creative arts, performing arts, and other arts and humanities.

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ACADEMIC MAJOR
A minimum of 18 semester credits in Community Health Education is required for the academic major. These core academic competencies emphasize the theories, principles and practices at the foundation of the discipline, and the philosophical and cultural implications of the field. They also incorporate applied elements of the discipline.

Academic major (18 credits)

CHE 301: Introduction to Community Health (3 credits)
CHE 305: Foundations of Healthcare (3 credits)
CHE 406: Health and Wellness (3 credits)
CHE 415: Sexuality throughout the Lifespan (3 credits)
CHE 431: Legal and Ethical Aspects of Healthcare (3 credits)
CHE 467: Developing Health and Wellness Programs (3 credits)

Course Descriptions

RES 499: SENIOR PROJECT (15 CREDITS)
The fifteen-credit Senior Project is undertaken upon successful completion of the final examination. The project is intended to provide the University with a quality review of the student's professional and academic competencies.

Overview of Senior Project
Senior Project Proposal
Manuscript Outline
Referencing the Literature
Manuscript Presentation
Senior Project Review

Overview of Senior Project
The fifteen-credit Senior Project is undertaken upon successful completion of the final examination. The project is intended to provide the University with a quality review of the student's professional and academic competencies.

The process includes a brief proposal stage, data gathering and manuscript preparation stage, and a project review stage. Students are provided an opportunity to investigate an area of special interest in their academic concentration, which has potential for advancing their profession development.

The Senior Project is presented in a formal manuscript approximating 50 double-spaced typewritten pages including attachments with proper referencing and citations of the scholarly literature. The student's project should convey a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter. While most projects may take the form of a standard research project, with the mentor's approval, students may pursue another appropriate format such as an audio- or videotape project, a recorded public performance, a business plan, original work of art, detailed case study or another relevant project.

Senior Project Proposal
Before beginning the research of the scholarly literature and data gathering activities and any actual writing of your project manuscript, students prepare and submit a formal proposal for approval. The University provides an approved research proposal format requirements within the online program handbook. Students should be prepared to provide necessary facts and information as needed by the mentor in reviewing the research proposal. Students are also expected to carefully examine the University's manuscript guidelines to conform their documents.

It will prove best for students to begin discussions with their primary mentor concerning the Senior Project topic soon after registration. After sufficient exploration, the expectations of the mentor and the manuscript requirements for the project will become clear. Students should also discuss with their mentor the issues of research protocol related to working with human subjects and the use and care of live animals, if this is to be part of the Senior Project.

Manuscript Outline
The student will be guided in the presentation of a master outline for the proposed manuscript. This will help the student more fully develop the proposal package and clarify the structure of the academic argument. The manuscript outline is intended to bring strength to the scholarly discussion, helping the student organize an effective exploration of the subject matter. The student should carefully review the University's written guidelines for manuscript preparation provided in the online program handbook.

Referencing the Literature
Students pursuing the alternative Bachelor’s Program may be new to the referencing requirements for major academic papers and should discuss these with the primary mentor before beginning the project.

Manuscript Presentation
The Senior Project should closely adhere to the manuscript guideline presented in the University’s online program handbook and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. The manuscript should be prepared and bound in an acceptable manner for permanent archival storage. Spiral and press binding are acceptable.

Project Review
Once students have prepared the Senior Project manuscript, they will schedule the formal review process. The primary mentor and the Center Director (or an assigned representative) will conduct both the formal physical review of the manuscript and the oral review of the project.

The physical review of the project manuscript usually takes the review committee two to four weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to the underlying review of the literature, the project methodology, the mechanics of the project, and formal presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The oral review of the project is conducted under the direction of the primary mentor with the assistance of Center Director (or an assigned representative). The examination is carried out by telephone conference call or another synchronous method and is designed to allow detailed investigation of the project. The faculty reviewers explore issues related to the project including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the project review process is a set of final expectations directing the student through the remaining tasks for correcting the project manuscript. Once the final manuscript is approved, the student will arrange suitable binding for the document and later ship the bound project to the University headquarters for permanent archival storage.

EXM 480: FINAL EXAMINATION (6 credits)
Once the coursework assessment is satisfactorily completed, the University schedules the Comprehensive Final Examination. The Center Director and an assigned faculty specialist representing the student’s primary academic area conduct the written and oral elements of the final examination.

The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from the academic competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

EXM 488: Final Examination (6 credits)

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ELECTIVES
Bachelor's participants must accumulate a minimum of 120 semester credits toward the degree, as outlined by the University. In addition to the credit requirements for basic education, the academic major and minor, and the mandated project and examination courses, students must complete additional course credits to bring the summary total of approved coursework to a minimum of 120 semester credits.

CREDIT EQUIVALENCY ASSESSMENT

The route toward the award of the Bachelor's degree includes an extensive equivalency evaluation of the student's career background and educational preparation. The process includes a review of college transcripts and non-college training documentation, and a thorough assessment of the student's professional portfolio.

Review of Prior Education and Training Documentation
Review of Professional Portfolios

Review of Prior Education and Training Documentation
College coursework and college level equivalency training completed at recognized education and training institutions are accepted credit-for-credit, provided the coursework satisfies meaningful elements of your program of studies. As a participant in the alternative undergraduate program, students may have an unlimited number of transfer credits applied toward their degree. Student’s should carefully review the University's guidelines regarding transfer credits and explore these details with their primary mentor.

The University will accept all credits, point-for-point from recognized educational institutions, including training institutions (such as those organizations approved by the American Council of Education and other reputable groups across the global community). Formal transcripts or notarized affidavits must be provided for all awards of transfer credits. All transfer courses are translated to the semester credit system followed by the University.

Review of Professional Portfolios
As a participant in the alternative undergraduate program, students may have an unlimited number of equivalency credits applied toward their degree through assessment of professional portfolios.

Overview of Portfolio Process
Prior Learning Policy
The Portfolio Document
Portfolio Evaluation
General Guidelines for Review Process

The professional portfolio should be developed relative to creditworthy elements of the student's career background for which sufficient credible evidence exists to correlate effectively with college-level learning objectives. The source of prior learning might be advanced employment experience, non-college training, continuing education, seminars and conferences, professional achievements, employment training, language training, technical classes, training leading to special certificates, diplomas and licenses or other advanced level learning obtained from personal and professional achievements.

Duplicative credit may not be awarded. Students are advised to carefully review the University's guidelines covering prior learning assessment and discuss these matters in detail with the primary mentor starting immediately after program registration.

Prior Learning Policy
The University respects the college-level prior learning of its adult students to the extent that such learning is appropriate to the degrees pursued by our students and satisfies the expectations of the University's faculty. The University allows prior learning to be credited toward the Bachelor's degree from transfer courses (by transcript review) and from appropriate career experience and non-college training (by professional portfolio evaluation).

Mid-career adults have creditworthy elements in their backgrounds for which sufficient credible evidence exists of advanced level learning. The source of prior learning might include work experience, non-college training, continuing education, seminars and conferences, career experiences and personal achievements, employment training, language training, technical classes, training leading to special certificates, diplomas and licenses and other advanced level learning obtained from personal and professional achievements.

Under the direction of the University’s primary mentors, and within certain clearly defined guidelines, students may submit and array of professional portfolios for assessment of college equivalency credit in fulfillment of the requirements for the alternative Bachelor’s degree.

The Portfolio Document
The portfolio document must be presented in a manner that allows a detailed formal evaluation to be made of the prior learning. Students are required to attach copies of the necessary documentation, affidavits and certificates that permit an effective comparison of the prior learning experiences to the course objectives. While the portfolio document must include this authentic documentation, an equally important element is the student’s narrative that summarizes and discusses the knowledge, skills and competencies acquired in the professional setting, or through non-college training. Portfolios are allowed in all academic fields and are usually designed to permit the student to demonstrate higher levels of cognition where they have used the subject matter to address real world situations in a creative manner. Permission to submit a portfolio for assessment should be requested by the student at the time the Study Plan is established.

Prior learning assessment courses deemed complete will have the specified semester credits awarded on the student’s permanent record. If a student is unsuccessful at passing the portfolio assessment, the mentor may decide to assign additional text and journal readings and other necessary exploratory activities in order to prepare the student for an additional course assessment (at additional cost to the student). After successfully completing these additional assignments and assessments, course credit will be granted. A standardize attachment to the Study Plan is used to communicate the content of the prior learning assessment to be undertaken.

Portfolio Evaluation
Professional portfolio evaluation is a detailed assessment of a student’s prior learning in a limited and defined area, including the gathering together of authentic documents to validate and demonstrate advanced level learning. The task of the University faculty is to guide the student in structuring a formal written presentation in support of documentation from professional achievements and non-college training. To be awarded credit, all prior learning must clearly fulfill the academic objectives of the course and reflect the appropriate level of complexity in academic learning. The primary faculty advisor shall independently evaluate each course approved for portfolio assessment. Upon completion of each course pursued by prior learning assessment, at the time of submission of the course grade, the portfolio document is transferred by post to the University headquarters for storage in the University archival library.

General Guidelines for the Portfolio Review Process
The following guidelines explain the process whereby Bachelor’s students may progress through the alternative process of the College Equivalency Review.

  • Students wishing to enroll for the alternative Bachelor’s Program and pursue the equivalency review must submit a complete Admission Application including the $100 Admission Fee.
  • The University will assign a qualified primary mentor to assist the student in assembling an effective array of portfolio documents addressing the minimum requirements for the Bachelor’s degree.
  • The University will supply the student with standard portfolio presentation forms to be used in providing materials and information for equivalency review relative to professional achievements, non-college training, proficiency examinations, and prior college coursework.
  • The primary mentor will assist the student in itemizing each element of prior learning for college equivalency credit (1-6 credits per element of the review) and will guide the student in gathering required documentation, transcripts from other schools, and written materials needed for review.
  • The student will submit the entire document in binders with a complete Table of Contents.
  • Photocopies of documentation, letters of support, affidavits and student narratives must be provided as background for items listed on the portfolio forms. A complete set of documents and supporting materials must be included.
  • The tuition fee of $2000 must be included, in advance of the portfolio submission, at the time of formal Registration.
  • An additional $500 tuition fee may be required if the initial review falls short of approval and an additional partial review is required.
  • The assigned mentor will review the student’s portfolio package in its entirety (transcripts and portfolio materials) and determine if the core elements and the required total of 120 semester credits are present. The primary mentor will request advisement from the University administration is consulting with appropriate faculty relative to certain areas of the portfolio review.
  • Should the assigned mentor determine that additional materials, documentation (or further academic work) is required in a subject matter area; the student would be expected to respond accordingly prior to the issuance of the course credit and the degree.

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PROGRAM FACULTY

Kenneth Brownson, EdD, RNC, AHI
Program Director

Dr. Brownson has been in the healthcare field for over 40 years starting as a Naval Hospital Corpsman in 1965. As a registered nurse he has worked in hospitals, community agencies, and the mental health field. He earned an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing from Delaware Technical, BSPS (Education) from St. Joseph’s College, MSM in Management from The American College, MS in Psychology from California Coast University, a Graduate Certificate in Community Health Education from California College of Health Sciences, and an EdD in Adult and Non-traditional Education from Newport University and additional graduate study in Public Health at American Public university. Dr. Brownson has been involved in distance education for 20 years with the last 8 years focusing on online courses. He has taught online courses and/or developed courses for online presentation at Southern New Hampshire University, Lakeland College, Park University, Baker College, and Grand Canyon University. He served as the Dean of Undergraduate Studies at Greenwich University for 10 years. He is on the editorial Board of The Health Care Manager. He served as Vice President of the Board of Directors at Brandywine Counseling for 5 years and on the advisory board of Inservice Training Institute for 6 years. Dr. Brownson has written a book, College at Home for Nurses and All Healthcare Professionals. He has had over 40 articles published in professional healthcare journals. He received a first place in the feature writing contest in 2003, 2004, 2007 and second place in 2005 sponsored by American Medical Technologists. He is a Registered Nurse and certified as a Psychiatric and Mental Health Nurse by American Nurses Credentialing Center. He is also certified as an Allied Health Instructor by American Medical Technologists.

James O. Wear, Ph.D., CCE, CHSP, FASHE
Health Center Director

James O. Wear holds a B.S. (l959), M.S. (l960), and Ph.D. (l961) from the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville, AR). He is Managing Director, Little Rock Employee Education Resource Center (LREERC), Department of Veterans Affairs. With the Department of Veterans Affairs, he is responsible for training of engineering and safety personnel in their 172 hospitals, which includes about 10,000 employees. Dr. Wear was Professor, Biomedical Instrumentation Technology, College of Health Related Professions, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (Little Rock, AR) from 1972-2000. He is active in the American College of Clinical Engineering, Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation and the American Society of Healthcare Engineering. Dr. Wear is a Certified Clinical Engineer and a Certified Health Care Safety Professional. He is a Fellow in the American Society of Healthcare Engineering. He has served on the Certification Board of Examiners for Biomedical Engineering Technician, Clinical Engineers, and Health Care Safety Professionals. Dr. Wear is a founder and co-chairman of the Commission for the Advancement of Healthcare technology Management in Asia (CAHTMA). This organization will develop certification programs and workshops in healthcare technology management for countries in Asia. Dr. Wear has written over 150 publications in national journals in Chemistry, Clinical and Biomedical Engineering, and Hospital Safety, twenty chapters in books and co-authored Clinical Engineering Manual, Introduction to Clinical Engineering, Hospital Safety Manual, BMET Handbook, Hospital Safety Handbook, Hospital Equipment Preventive Maintenance Manual, Nursing Home Equipment Preventive Maintenance Manual, and Hospital Engineering Manual. Dr. Wear has made over 200 presentations at regional, national and international meetings in Chemistry, Clinical and Biomedical Engineering, and Hospital Safety. He has lectured in workshops and courses in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Australia, Thailand, Brazil, Nepal, South Africa, Singapore and Malaysia. Many of these presentations have been for the World Health Organization with the American College of Clinical Engineering. Dr. Wear has taught a graduate course in Clinical Engineering Management at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

Deryl Gulliford, Ph.D
Dr. Gulliford is CEO of Seiling Hospital, located near Oklahoma City. He holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Ohio State University College of Medicine and is National Chairman of the Small and Rural Healthcare Section, American Academy of Medical Administrators. He has authored or co-authored over 30 journal publications and four medical textbooks. His article, Surviving the Financial Restructuring of Health Care, won the 1986 Travenol Literary Award as best health care management paper in a national journal. Dr. Gulliford earned his BS in Allied Medicine at Ohio State University, his MS in Health Administration and Health Planning from the University of Cincinnati, a Ph.D. in Health Services Administration from Clayton University and a Ph.D. from Greenwich University in Health Services Administration. Deryl is currently pursuing an online Juris Doctorate for California Bar-eligibility.

Mansoor Quli Khan, B.Sc., M.B.B.S., Ph.D., MD
Dr. Khan received his B.Sc. from Vikram University (MP, India), his M.B.B.S. (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) from Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Indore University (India), and his MD (Doctor of Medicine in Pathology and Microbiology) from Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal University (India). He also holds a Ph.D. in Haematology from Greenwich University. Dr. Khan served as a Haematologist Consultant, Director of Medical Laboratory, and Department Head with Haematology Department, at Central Hospital, Riyadh Medical Complex, Saudi Arabia, for more than 25 years. Dr. Khan has also served as Department Head of Microbiology and Haematology at the MP Shah Medical College and Irwin Hospital, Jamnagar (Gujrat), India. Dr. Khan presently serves as visiting consultant Clinical Haematologist and Oncologist with HOSMAT Hospital and others, in Bangalore, India. He has received numerous awards for his work in Saudi Arabia and India and has published several professional papers with international medical journals in the fields of haematology, pathology, microbiology and parasitology.

Vijay P Gupta, Ph.D., MD
Dr. Gupta earned his M.B.B.S. from Agra University in India, his D.F.M. in Forensic Medicine from Bangalore University, India and his Ph.D. in Forensic Medicine and Toxicology from Greenwich University. He presently works for the Ministry of Health in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as Legal Specialist and Clinical Toxicologist. Dr. Gupta is a member of ten international medical, forensic and toxicological societies; has written more than 17 published papers on forensic science and toxicology and received awards for his work in both India and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Gordon S. Harmon, BS, MPH
Gordon Stewart Harmon has been a practicing family historian and genealogist since 1977 when he began to ask his paternal grandmother about his Italian heritage. After some early information from these discussions, he began the journey. Growing up in Arkansas and Oklahoma, he completed his undergraduate degree from Northeastern State University and obtained his graduate degree at the University of Oklahoma. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel from the US Army Special Forces/Special Operations in 1996 after serving for 29 years on active duty and the Army Reserve. He was assigned to various positions and in joint command assignments. A graduate of the Command and General Staff College, he did tours in Viet Nam and later, Operation Desert Storm (Gulf War) and Operation Enduring Freedom (Bosnia) where he served with the Special Operations Command, Europe - this completed his military service. He taught as an Assistant Professor at the University of Kentucky, Colleges of Medicine (Department of Community Medicine) and Allied Health (Department of Community Health). He served on the faculty with the Academy of Health Sciences, Department of the Army. He has published several copyrighted books and articles on his family history and other family surnames including client’s genealogical research reports. Gordon currently serves as President of the Endecott-Endicott Family Association, Inc., an international family association. He completed (December, 2006) the requirements for the Certificate Program with the Heritage Genealogy College based in Salt Lake City and is now on the faculty. Currently, he is near completion of submitting his formal portfolio for his credentials as a Certified Genealogist SM with the Board for Certification of Genealogist based in Washington, DC. He is an active member of several national, state and local genealogical and historical societies and currently is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists. Gordon is a regular contributor to several family surname newsletters and genealogical forums. He resides in Springfield, Missouri, USA.

Richard K. Tweneboah, Ph.D.
Dr. Tweneboah earned his doctorate in Health Services from Walden University, his Master s in Health Services Management from the New School for Social Research in New York City, and his Bachelor s from the Graduate School of Management in London. Dr. Tweneboah started his professional career as a health care consultant in Ghana and participated in many complex projects for various health care organizations in Africa and Europe. As an Accountant and Financial Analyst, he served with major corporations including American Express, Medtronic Incorporated, Coopers and Lybrand, LLP, Northwest Bank, US Bank and others. Dr. Tweneboah is presently authoring two books in managed health care for the developing world.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CHE 301: Introduction to Community Health (3 credits)
This course will familiarize the student with scientific, psychological, cultural, and behavioral aspects of community health. The discipline of community health shares similarities with the public health except that it is more focused on education and health promotion, based on the needs of a particular community. Community health emphasizes preventive medicine and the philosophy, religion, economics, government, education, science, aspirations, and folklore of a community.

CHE 305: Foundations of Healthcare (3 credits)
This course attempts to describe the different aspects of the health care system as it exists today. Each countries' healthcare system is unique and different than others'. Each countries' system is related to their history and the importance each country places on individual responsibility for health and social well being. Traditionally, governments get involved when community efforts fail. The healthcare system in many countries is very diverse with healthcare functions being carried out in many different agencies including: education, environmental health, mental health, and welfare.

CHE 406: Health and Wellness (3 credits)
This course is a study of health and wellness encompassing nutritional, physical, emotional, cultural, and spiritual aspects of health and wellness with emphasis on behavioral, environmental and social influences of a community in the modern era. The emphasis of this course is on the process of being active and assertive which leads us to promote health and wellness in the community.

CHE 415: Sexuality throughout the Lifespan (3 credits)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the biological, psychological, cultural, and behavioral aspects of human sexuality and family life. The overall theme of the course focuses on responsible sexual behaviors and attitudes. Cultural and psychological dimensions have impacted sexual attitudes and practices in our culture. Cross-cultural and historical comparisons can help students understand how sexuality is culturally and historically determined.

CHE 431: Legal and Ethical Aspects of Healthcare (3 credits)
This course explores the legal and ethical aspects of health care with an emphasis on privacy standards, patient’s rights, confidentiality, case law, codes of ethics, documentation, reporting requirements, release of information and accreditation standards within a particular country.

CHE 467: Developing Health and Wellness Programs (3 credits)
This course gives students tools and skills needed to develop and promote health and wellness programs within the community. The student will gain knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices of optimal health and wellness promotion, including nutrition, exercise and fitness, community health, addictions, health care planning and marketing, and developing and evaluating health promotion programs. Graduates of the BSCHE program will actively participate and contribute as health and wellness leaders in a variety of settings within the community.

EXM 485: Final Examination (6 credits)
Once the senior project is satisfactorily completed, the University schedules the Final Examination. The assigned faculty advisor representing the student’s primary academic field will conduct the written and oral elements of the final examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Student answers are expected to draw from the academic competencies of their programs with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone or another approved synchronous conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses. [Author: Dr. Douglass Capogrossi, Instructor: To be assigned]

RES 499: Senior Project (15 credits)
The Senior Project is intended to provide the University with a quality review of the student’s overall academic competencies relative to the field of study. The process includes a brief proposal stage, data gathering and manuscript preparation stage, and a project review stage. Students are provided an opportunity to investigate an area of special interest in their academic concentration, which has potential for advancing their profession development. The Senior Project is presented in a formal manuscript approximating 20 to 25 double-spaced typewritten pages with proper referencing and citations of the scholarly literature. The student’s project should convey a comprehensive understanding of the subject matter. While most projects may take the form of a standard research project, with the mentor's approval, students may pursue another appropriate format such as an audio- or videotape project, a recorded public performance, a business plan, original work of art, detailed case study or another relevant project. [Author: Dr. Douglass Capogrossi, Instructor: To be assigned

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Applied Psychology
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Akamai University is internationally accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC). The University has earned Premier status with ASIC for its commendable areas of operation. ASIC is an approved accrediting body for the purposes of compliance by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) is a member of the British Quality Foundation (BQF), sits on the Quality Standards Group of UK NARIC, and is one of a number of international accrediting bodies listed in the international directory by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) in the USA and is a member of the CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG).

Akamai University
187 Kino`ole Street
Hilo, Hawaii 96720 USA