Search Akamai University

Tel: 1 (808) 934-8793 (International) Toll Free Number: 1 (855) 934-8793

Home
All About Akamai
Accreditation
Alumni Commentary
Administration
Faculty
Admissions
Degree Programs
Tuition and Fees
Virtual Campus
Virtual Library
Research Hall
Contact Information
Enroll Now


Visit The Akamai University Store

Contribute to Akamai University

Join the Akamai University Sponsorship Campaign



Center-CEES

Course Directory

Department of Environmental and Life Sciences
Department of Environmental Policy and Sustainability
Department of Applied Environmental Technology
Standard Universitywide Courses

Department of Environmental and Life Sciences

ELS500: Readings in Environmental and Life Sciences (6 credits)
This course provides a graduate-level overview and detailed readings in the current theories, principles, and research related to ecological and environmental studies. The course assignments and learning activities will focus on the fundamental theories and foundational readings in environmental studies. Course content will be individualized to include literature reviews and case studies related to the student's area of emphasis. This course is required of all entry Environmental and Life Sciences Masters students within the first semester of study.

ELS510: Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies (6 credits)
This course will focus on the integration of life science, technology, social science, and economics within the study of environmental issues. Course readings and assignments will address both the need for and practice of systematic holistic analysis in the investigation of environmental and ecological issues. Course content will be individualized to include case studies or specific readings related to the student's area of emphasis.

ELS511: Applied Environmental Science (6 credits)
The focus of this course is the practical application of environmental science to the resolution, remediation, and exploration of real world issues and problems related to human interaction with the environment. Readings and case studies will focus on anthropogenic impacts and how current theories and protocols in environmental science are being applied to address those issues. Students will be encouraged to think about practical solutions and develop meaningful alternatives to address a variety of factors associated with these issues.

ELS512: Global Ecology (4 credits)
This course presents foundational readings and studies related to ecological dynamics on the regional and global scales. Students will be asked to consider a wide range of issues that may affect the stability or dynamics of the global ecosystem with respect to atmospheric chemistry, desertification, population dynamics, food resources, and natural bio-geochemical cycles. The course will facilitate detailed explorations of these topics as well as specific issues related to the student's area of emphasis.

ELS515: Earth Science (4 credits)
This course presents a graduate-level overview of current theories and concepts related to earth science. Specific topics to be covered in the course relate to tectonic features and patterns, natural geological cycles, and geosphere-biosphere interactions. Students will be asked to examine a variety of issues related to ecological shifts on a geological time-scale. Readings and assignments will also focus on the formation and occurrence of non-renewable earth resources.

ELS516: Applied Physics and Mechanics (4 credits)
The focus of this course in on the fundamental principles of Newtonian physics and electricity and magnetism, as applied to the study of environmental and geological phenomena. Classical kinematics and dynamics, gas theory, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and the physics of the atomic world will be explored through this course. A basic understanding of calculus is recommend, but not required for this course.

ELS518: Environmental Geology (4 credits)
This course focuses on a detailed review of current theories and research related to geological cycles, processes, and patterns and how they relate to environmental conditions both past and present. Students will be asked to examine a variety of environmental and ecological issues across the spectrum of natural history in an examination of definable patterns and an assessment of current trends. Readings and assignments will be individualized to address topics pertinent to the student's research focus.

ELS 530: Agricultural Studies (4 credits)
This course focuses on the connection between agriculture, husbandry, aqua- and mare-culture, and forestry practices on the environment. Readings and course assignments will address both sustainable best management practices and unsustainable agricultural practices. The student will be asked to examine the connections between specific practices and eutrophication, soil erosion, and aquifer depletion. Course related assignments will also focus on practices and alternatives in both developed and developing nations.

ELS538: The Ecology of World Hunger (4 credits)
This course focuses on the issues related to food production, population, food policy, and the resources required to meet human nutritional needs. Course assignments and readings will explore fishery pressures, monoculture impacts on genetic diversity, resource intensive agriculture, genetically modified organisms, and nutritional perspectives. Students will examine food policies, social-cultural influences, ethnographic evidence, and apply their findings to a wide range of problems related to world hunger.

ELS541: Principals and Theories of Environmental Biology (6 credits)
This course provides a detailed exploration of current topics research techniques, and theories in modern environmental biology. Students will be required to do an extensive literature review on a variety of issues related to the field. Course readings and assignments will help the student develop analytical and critical analyses of methodologies, study results, scope/limitations, and applications of appropriate protocols and technologies. Readings will be individualized to address specific research interests of the student. There are no pre-requisites for this course.

ELS543: Zoology and Species Studies (4 credits)
This course explores the areas of animal classification, anatomy, natural history, and behavior. Readings and assignments will focus on the general theories, classification patterns, and identification protocols. Additionally, the student will be asked to undertake a detailed examination of a particular family of organisms of interest to the student of their research. Focus will be on basic anatomical systems, embryology, ecological niches, feeding patterns, mating habits, and habitat requirements. Attention will also be given to the care and ethical treatment of captive, domestic, or research animals. Students should have completed ELS541 or have permission from the instructor prior to enrolling in this course.

ELS545: Marine Biology (4 credits)
This course serves as a graduate level exploration of the biology of coastal and open-water marine organisms. Readings and course assignments will present a broad overview of the field and will present a wide range of current research in marine biology. Studies will focus on the marine environment, the physical and chemical factors influencing marine organisms, marine ecosystems, the diversity of marine life, classification of marine organisms, distribution, natural history, physiology, community types, and anthropogenic stresses on the marine environment. Students should have completed ELS541 or have permission from the instructor prior to enrolling in this course.

ELS546: Processes in Coastal and Estuarine Zones (2 credits)
This course serves as an interdisciplinary description and analysis of environmental processes that form, maintain, and influence coastal habitats. Readings and course assignments will focus on the science and management issues of the coastal ocean, including estuaries and continental shelves. The course is organized around six major topics: 1) the unique nature of the coastal and estuarine environments; 2) sediment transport and dynamics; 3) shallow water clastic environments with emphasis on barrier islands, deltas, estuaries, wetlands, and tidal flats; 4) eutrophication and habitat quality issues; 5) living resources and fisheries; and 6) ecology of major coastal and estuarine habitats.

ELS548: Oceanography (4 credits)
This course will focus on establishing an understanding of marine science as an interdisciplinary topic. Course readings and assignments will explore the physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes and interactions in the oceans. This course will emphasize the nature of the ocean environments and will be organized into four main sections: 1) the geological structure of ocean basins; 2) the physical properties of seawater and the processes responsible for patterns of water movement; 3) the chemical composition of the marine environment; and 4) the general biology of marine organisms.

ELS552: Environmental Chemistry (4 credits)
This course will focus on the examination of underlying chemical concepts and mechanisms of important environmental problems. Readings and course assignments will explore pollutant structures, pathways, reaction mechanisms, and by-products associated with energy production, ozone depletion, acid deposition, greenhouse effect, anthropogenic pollutants, agricultural compounds, and organochlorine compounds. The student will explore several case studies to examine the basic environmental chemistry of common practices and processes.

ELS554: Ecotoxicology (4 credits)
This course is a graduate-level introduction to ecotoxicology and the study of harmful chemicals in an ecosystem. Course readings will examine the fate, pathway, uptake, transference, and impacts of both naturally occurring and anthropogenic toxins upon various components within a wide range of ecosystem structures. Course assignments can be individualized to examine a compound, family of compounds, process, or ecosystem of particular interest to the student. Students should have completed ELS552 or have permission from the instructor prior to enrolling in this course.

ELS556: Environmental Carcinogenesis (4 credits)
This course will focus on a detailed examination of the process and action of chemical, biological, and physical carcinogens. Readings and course assignments will explore the environmental health implications of environmental carcinogens and examine human and mammalian cancer rates in conjunction with epidemiological studies, known carcinogenic mechanisms, risk assessment techniques, and confounding factors. Students should have completed ELS541 and ELS552, or have permission from the instructor prior to enrolling in this course.

ELS562: Life Sciences and Environmental Health (6 credits)
This course will focus on a broad graduate-level overview of issues in modern environmental health studies. Course assignments and readings will explore issues related to epidemiology, chronic and acute exposures, body burdens, dose assessments, uptake pathways, and the mechanisms and effects of a wide spectrum of environmental toxins. Students will be asked to critically evaluate current research across a host environmental health concerns including lead poisoning, air quality, drinking water standards, UV exposure, and waste treatment. Course readings will be individualized to address specific research interests of the student. ELS541 is recommended, but not required for enrollment in this course.

ELS564: Environmental Health and Protection (4 credits)
This course focuses on the public health aspects of environmental research. Course assignments and readings will address public health protection and studies across a wide spectrum of environmental risks. The course assignments will emphasis a critical review of current research and theories in environmental public health from the work of John Snow to present. Course readings will be individualized to address specific research interests of the student. Students should have completed ELS562 or have permission from the instructor prior to enrolling in this course.

ELS565: Case Studies in Environmental Public Health (2 credits)
This short course will focus on a critical review and analysis of case studies in environmental public health. The student will be required to identify the area of investigation (instructor approval required) and will perform a comprehensive literature review and analysis on the issue. Students should have completed ELS562 and ELS564, or have permission from the instructor prior to enrolling in this course.

ELS569: Emerging Diseases and the Environment (4 credits)
This course will focus on the public health and environmental influences of emerging infectious diseases. Readings and course assignments will explore to the future of domestic and international public health practice as well as examine the role of societal incursion and modern transportation in the spread of previously isolate diseases and disease vectors. Students will review a wide spectrum of current research into such diseases as Pfiesteria, West Nile Virus, Avian Vacuolar Myelinopathy, and others, as well as resurgent/resistant strains of malaria, dengue, cholera, and tuberculosis. Course assignments will be individualized to the research interests of the student. Students should have completed ELS562 or have permission from the instructor prior to enrolling in this course.

ELS581: Environmental Physiology (4 credits)
This course provides a detailed exploration of the physiological adaptations of higher animals to a host of environmental factors. Students will investigate animal responses to shifts in temperate, water and air quality, and habitat changes. Readings and course assignments will also explore behavioral adaptations of animals to their environment, with particular emphasis on the evolution of behaviors related to feeding, reproduction, habitat selection, and social interactions. Completion of ELS543 is recommended, but not required for enrollment in this course.

ELS590: Ecology and Biodiversity (6 credits)
This course will provide an extensive survey and analysis of the foundational literature, theories, and research on the state, importance, maintenance, and analysis of biological and genetic diversity. Students will be asked to critically examine a wide spectrum of issues and theories associated with biological diversity and its conservation including ecological theory, taxonomic methods, diversity models, and assessment methods. Through course assignments and readings, students will explore their own theories related to trends and shifts in biodiversity patterns; pragmatic and economically feasible conservation solutions; and integration of interdisciplinary information into a comprehensive analysis of biodiversity issues as they relate to ecological analysis. Completion of ELS541 or permission from the instructor is required for enrollment in this course.

Return to Course Directory

Department of Environmental Policy and Sustainability

EPS500: Readings in Environmental Policy and Sustainability (6 credits)
This course provides a graduate-level overview and detailed readings in the current theories, principles, and research related to the development of environmental policy and sustainable environmental planning. The course assignments and learning activities will focus on the fundamental theories and foundational readings in environmental policy and planning. Course content will be individualized to include literature reviews and case studies related to the student's area of emphasis. This course is required of all entry Environmental Policy and Sustainability Masters students within the first semester of study.

EPS502: Science, Environment, and Society (2 credits)
This course explores the methods and nature of scientific inquiry and the role of interdisciplinary science in modern society. The course draws on a wide range of case studies in analyzing the way science is used to explore and manage the global environment and its resources. The student will be asked to examine the connection between politics, science, and social movements. Course readings and assignments will be targeted towards the student's area of research focus.

EPS503: Global Environmental Issues and Solutions (6 credits)
This course provides a detailed graduate-level exploration of environmental issues, concerns, management practices, technical considerations, and proposed solutions related to a wide scope of natural and anthropogenic influences that impact global patterns. Course content will be individualized to include literature reviews and case studies related to the student's area of emphasis. There is no prerequisite required for enrollment in this course.

EPS511: Applied Ecology and Conservation (4 credits)
This course provides a detailed exploration of issues related the study of ecology and conservation as interdisciplinary and systems sciences. Readings and course assignments will focus on interactions between living and non-living elements of the environment. Students will focus on a critical and analytical analysis of terrestrial and aquatic ecology, biogeochemical cycling, ecosystem community interactions, nutrient and energy pathways, competition, niche theory, population dynamics and human ecology. Course topics will also focus on practical, innovative, and integrated conservation principles and practices along with case studies focused on various conservation methods.

EPS514: Conservation Philosophy and Theory (6 credits)
This course provides an extensive overview of the foundational readings and theories associated with formation and evolution of various international conservation movements. Course readings and assignments will integrate concepts in environmental ethics, social movements, and philosophy with elements of environmental economics, resource management, and utility theory. Students will be asked to examine the integrated nature of practical and theoretical conservation paradigms and critically assess the logical, environmental, and practical aspects of them. Some aspects of the course literature review will be individualized to include specific case studies related to the student's area of emphasis.

EPS519: Environmental History (4 credits)
This course will address aspects of natural and environmental history across various regions and biomes. Course readings and assignments will address paleobiology, paleoecology, biodiversity patterns, and human emergence. Students will be asked to explore issues related to the relationships between people and nature including agricultural development, pastoralism, disease pathways and vectors, hunting, mining, crop production and exportation, population growth, and conservation. There is no prerequisite required for enrollment in this course.

EPS521: Sustainable Development and Management (4 credits)
This course focuses on the balance between economic development and the necessity to protect and preserve the global environment. Students will explore domestic issues facing developed countries as well as those encountered in developing countries as they struggle to address economic, technical, and environmental problems. Readings and assignments will address international relationships, best management practices, and management policies. Students will examine a wide variety of case studies in order to understand the interaction and interdisciplinary issues related to the environment, society, economics, and sustainable development on the local, regional, and global levels.

EPS522: Effective Environmental Stewardship (2 credits)
This course examines the interdisciplinary analysis and management of environmental issues form an ethical, social, aesthetic, political, economic, and ecological perspective. Course readings and assignments will examine the environmental impact of modern societal decisions from a variety of frames of reference. Topics will include environmental justice, eco-feminism, activism, religion, ecological sustainability, biodiversity, globalization, animal rights, and political considerations. Students will be asked to explore case studies and develop a project investigating environmental issues of local, regional, or global significance.

EPS524: Environmental Planning and Management (6 credits)
This course examines topics related to regional planning and addresses the complex relationships between the geological environment and human development. Students will be asked to explore land use, the impact of geologic hazards on land use, impacts of land use on fragile environments, population patterns, resource capabilities, and transportation structures. Additional topics will include coastal erosion, flood control and management, groundwater resources, surface flow, and slope stability. Completion of EPS521 is recommended, but not required for enrollment in this course.

EPS525: Natural Resources Management (4 credits)
This course focuses on the sustainable management of both renewable and non-renewable natural resources. Course readings and assignments will explore renewable resource management, water rights and conservation issues, biological reserves, topsoil retention, mineral discovery and utilization, conservation of biodiversity, and best management practices for public resources. Students will be asked to critically examine case studies of a wide spectrum of real-world issues and provide analysis and options for sustainable management and utilization.

EPS528: Energy Policy and Sustainability (4 credits)
This course will examine the energy utilization patterns and policies of developed and developing nations. Readings and course assignments will focus on managed transition between fossil fuels and alternative/renewable energy sources; transportation fuels; sustainable energy growth; environmental impacts of energy conversion technologies; and technological developments in the field. Students will be asked to critically examine a wide range of case studies and current research and investigate alternatives to current limitation in energy development and utilization. Completion of EPS521 is recommended, but not required for enrollment in this course.

EPS530: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (4 credits)
This course examines the fundamental economic theory of environmental and resource issues. Course assignments and readings will integrate environmental costs with total economic cycle costs to develop a true picture of the economic benefits and considerations of environmental planning. Students will be asked to investigate a variety of management issues associated with environmental compliance and sustainable practices, and provide a detailed environmental economic analysis to selected case studies. Course assignments will also examine economic incentives/disincentives to implementation of environmentally sound and sustainable policies.

EPS534: International Political Economy and the Environment (4 credits)
The focus of this course will be on the practical implementation of economic theories across international environmental issues. Course assignments and readings will examine international policy and politics on the implementation of international environmental agreements; taxes, tariffs, and compacts as mechanism to implement environmental regulation; barriers to environmental treaties; different concepts of life-cycle valuation; and free trade issues as they relate to environmental and safety concerns. Students will be asked to investigate a variety of real-world examples and case studies and to critically analyze barriers to progress and possible alternatives for successful implementation. Completion of EPS530 is recommended, but not required, prior to enrolling in this course.

EPS540: Human Population and the Environment (4 credits)
The focus of this course will be the detailed examination of the impact of human population growth on the status of consumable resources, habitat, and general environmental quality. Course readings and assignments will examine issues related to ecological carrying capacities, human population dynamics, and resource consumption patterns. The student will be asked to review a number of case studies and theoretical examinations from developed and developing nations to explore options for sustainable human interaction with regional and global ecosystems. Critical examinations will also include pertinent economic, social, and political factors, which influence these issues.

EPS550: Environmental Analysis (4 credits)
This course provides a graduate-level review of the environmental issues involved in the design, construction, and management of facilities. Students will focus on practical applications to support sustainable development and operations as well as on the impacts of the constructed environmental upon local, regional, and global ecosystems. Topics will include recycling, energy management, transportation/logistics support, waste stream analysis, process development, best management practices, and the appropriate selection of remedial technologies. Completion of EPS521, or permission from the instructor is required prior to enrolling in this course.

EPS560: Environmental Security and Scarcity (4 credits)
This course will examine the importance of environmental conditions and sustainability on regional conflicts and national defense. Students will be asked to examine sustainability and resource scarcity as a fundamental cause of unrest in oppressed or marginalized populations. Course readings and assignments will focus on case studies from modern history of environmental issues leading to conflict and the use of environmental pollution as a weapon of war or oppression. Students will explore trends and warning signs, and devise several proposals for the remediation of underlying unrest and the elimination of conflict related to environmental conditions.

EPS564: Applied Environmental Policy Studies (6 credits)
The focus of this course will be on the comprehensive examination of the development, implementation, and responsible authorities for environmental policy within the United States. Students will examine how public and corporate environmental policies are developed and applied to a wide range of environmental issues and statues. Course readings and assignments will address the practical considerations of environmental rule making, economic and non-economic incentives to support policy, and socio-political considerations that often accompany the implementation of environmental policy. Some aspects of the course literature review will be individualized to include specific case studies related to the student's area of emphasis.

EPS566: Environmental Justice and Ethics (4 credits)
This course provides a detailed examination of environmental ethics and issues related to resource use, social philosophy, and environmental justice. Course readings and assignments will address the nature of public resources, ethical conflicts of development, the rights of future generations, and issues related to environmental racism. Students will be asked to consider and construct essays on how the philosophical issues of environmental ethics impact real-world decisions in environmental science and resource management policy.

EPS571: Environmental Law and Policy (4 credits)
This course will provide a broad graduate-level overview and survey of prominent standards in environmental law and policy. Readings and course assignments will examine laws, regulations, executive orders and policies within the United States; however, parallels will be drawn to accepted international standards and well known international exceptions. Students will be asked to explore current and historical legislation related to environmental protection, resource use, cleanup, chemical contamination, and occupational protection.

EPS574: Principles and Applications of Environmental Law (6 credits)
This course will present a comprehensive review of the current state of environmental law, statues, regulations and policies, from the U.S. and abroad. Foundational readings will be examined with respect to the practical and interdisciplinary ramifications of environmental law as well as to the development and application of supporting policy. The student will also be asked undertake a comprehensive and critical review of the current literature with respect to a specific and relevant issue in environmental law. Enrollment in this course is by permission of the instructor.

EPS575: Environmental and Natural Resource Law (4 credits)
The focus of this course will be on the detailed examination of the statues, regulations, and common law pertaining to natural resource utilization, risk-based utilization, and pollution abatement. Course readings and assignments will explore land use, mineral rights, threatened and endangered species, and surface and groundwater issues. Students will be asked to analyze current US law and propose change to better address the environmental problems involved. Analysis will focus on the relationships between landowners, public interest and interaction between legal and environmental systems.

EPS576: International Environmental Policy and Regulation (4 credits)
This course parallels EPS564, but will focus on a comprehensive examination of the development, implementation, and responsible authorities for environmental policy across the world. Students will examine how public and corporate environmental policies are developed and applied by a wide range of industrialized and developing nations, as well as by multi-national organizations such as the European Union and the G-8. Course readings and assignments will address the practical considerations of environmental rule making, economic and non-economic incentives to support policy, and socio-political considerations that often accompany the implementation of environmental policy.

EPS579: Marine and Coastal Policy (2 credits)
The focus of this course is the study of policy and policy making in the U.S. with regards to the costal and marine environments. Course assignments and readings will include the history and authority of various maritime organizations, legislation, and policies. Students will be asked to examine policy implications with respect to local, regional, national, and international arenas, such as fisheries management, marine pollution, seabed minerals, and petroleum transportation. Topics in this course will be explored through critical interdisciplinary analysis and will draw upon a wide range of considerations including, economic, political, sociological, and ecological issues.

Return to Course Directory

Department of Applied Environmental Technology

AET500: Readings in Applied Environmental Technology (6 credits)
This course provides a graduate-level overview and detailed readings in the current theories, principles, and research related to the development and implementation of environmental technologies. The course assignments and learning activities will focus on the fundamental theories and foundational readings in environmental technology, management, engineering, and planning. Course content will be individualized to include literature reviews and case studies related to the student's area of emphasis. This course is required of all entry Applied Environmental Technology Masters students within the first semester of study.

AET503: Interdisciplinary Studies in Environmental Technology (6 credits)
The focus of this course is the detailed and practical examination of technology oriented problems and solutions. Students will be asked to examine a wide spectrum of real-world issues, case studies, and applications to determine how technological applications could be applied to modify problematic processes, re-engineer existing systems, re-locate dangerous or risky activities, re-structure waste streams, or eliminate unnecessary or wasteful processes. Students will be asked to examine issues from an interdisciplinary framework that considers not only the technical aspects of treatment and design, but also takes into account the economics, social ramifications, political impacts, and environmental particulars of the situations and processes identified. Permission from the instructor is required prior to enrolling in this course.

AET520: Ecological Design and Engineering (4 credits)
This course will focus on the importance of comprehensive environmental planning, design, and engineering in a variety of development situations. Course readings and assignments will reflect real-world applications of both poor environmental design as well as those that highlight beneficial aspects of proper environmental design and implementation. The student will be required to review the current literature and provide case studies of current applications of sound environmental design and engineering. The impact of up-front ecological design and engineering practices on economic factors will also be examined in detail.

AET521: Pollution Prevention (4 credits)
This course will explore the nature, theory, and application of pollution prevention. Readings and course assignments will focus on opportunity assessments, waste stream evaluation, process evaluation and engineering, life-cycle valuation, cradle-to-grave logistics and management, and risk-based process decisions. Students will be asked to evaluate numerous scenarios designed to prevent pollution, rather than to treat it as an end-of-the-pipe, byproduct. Capital outlays, net-present value assessment, and return on investment analyses will also accompany case studies.

AET523: Environmental Pollution, Control, and Remediation (6 credits)
This course will present a broad and detailed overview of pollution control and remediation technologies. Readings and course assignments will focus on the practical application and appropriate use of various technologies in the remediation and compliance implementation of a wide variety of different industrial, agricultural, and technological processes. Some aspects of the course literature review will be individualized to include specific case studies related to the student's area of emphasis.

AET525: Bioremediation (4 credits)
The focus of this course will be on topics related to the development, research, and application of bioremediation technologies. Course readings and assignments will address such issues as biotransformation, biodegradation, microbial ecology, biomolecular engineering, process assessment, bacterial transport, and bioremediation design. Students will also be asked to examine the use of hyper-accumulator species and other innovative bioremediation techniques. Some aspects of the course literature review will be individualized to include specific case studies related to the student's area of emphasis. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in this course.

AET527: Emergency Planning and Recovery (4 credits)
The focus of this course will be to explore the environmental relevance of emergency planning and recovery operations from the framework of risk minimization and disaster control. The student will review management and preparedness plans, emergency operations procedures, policies (national and local), and interdisciplinary considerations necessary to minimize environmental impacts and human health risks from natural or man-made disasters. Some aspects of the course literature review will be individualized to include specific case studies related to the student's area of emphasis.

AET530: Studies in Solid Waste Management (2 credits)
This short course will present a detailed exploration of issues and research related to the management, reduction, and treatment of non-hazardous solid waste. Course readings and assignments will focus on the legal requirements of RCRA-Subtitle D, land farming, volume reduction, groundwater protection, recycling, incineration/RDF operations, and waste diversion technologies. Some aspects of the course literature review will be individualized to include specific case studies related to the student's area of emphasis. Completion of EPS521 or its equivalent is recommended but not required for enrollment in this course.

AET544: Alternative and Renewable Energy Applications (6 credits)
This course presents a comprehensive study of the numerous techniques for the conversion of energy using renewable and alternative sources of energy. Course readings and assignments will address the current state of technological development for these energy sources, possible applications in sustainable developments, technological limitations, and environmental impacts. Students will be asked to examine practical case studies and development issues and investigate alternative to current limitations of development and utilization.

AET550: Environmental Sociology (4 credits)
This course examines the effects of major social forces on the environmental, including political, economic, and population factors. Readings and course assignments will address the role of race, class, and gender on environmental awareness. Students will be asked to investigate the environmental problems that have arisen as a result of the growth of society in various parts of the world. The causes of each problem, methods for investigating the problem and the possible solutions that may be applied will be explored from a sociological and scientific perspective.

AET552: Community Ecology (2 credits)
This course provides a framework for the study of community ecology and an examination of the role of interactions between two or more species and their environment. Course readings and assignments will focus on the fundamental models and theories of the discipline. Topics will include techniques of community description, abiotic and biotic controls of community structure, the effects of stress and disturbance on ecosystems and human communities, food web dynamics, and the integration and preservation of biodiversity within the community framework.

AET560: Natural Processes and Environmental Consequences (4 credits)
This course focuses on the physical, chemical, and biological processes that heavily impact environmental quality. Course readings and assignments will focus on atmospheric releases from forest fires, geothermal vents, and volcanoes; terrestrial disturbances from dolines, landslips, and seismic activities; and aquatic disruptions associated with cyclic weather patterns, red tides, and salinity gradients. The student will be asked to examine the natural disturbance cycles of these activities and compare environmental impacts/shifts to similar anthropogenic activities.

AET562: Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Pathways (4 credits)
This course provides a graduate-level exploration of food-web transportation of environmental pollutants, particularly organochlorine contaminants and heavy metals. Course readings and assignments will focus on current research articles, which address theories of toxicity, mechanisms, or interaction, pathways of uptake, biomagnification, bioaccumulation, and biological elimination. Completion of ELS552, its equivalent, or permission from the instructor are required prior to enrolling in this course.

AET565: Acid Deposition: Its Consequences and Control (4 credits)
This course focuses on the sources (both natural and anthropogenic), mechanisms, and environmental effects of acidic deposition (acid rain, acid fog, acid snow, etc.). Course readings and assignments will address industrial sources of atmospheric pollutants and alternative technologies to those processes. Students will also examine the biological and ecological impacts of elevated pH on freshwater and terrestrial systems. Completion of ELS552 or its equivalent, are suggested, but not required to enroll in this course.

AET571: Physical Hydrology (4 credits)
This course provides a fundamental exploration of concepts, theories, and research in hydrology with emphasis on the distribution, characteristics, and migration of groundwater. Course readings and assignments will examine the use of quantitative models based on analytical and numerical algorithms to understand the interrelationship of the various elements and components, which regulate the hydrologic environment.

AET573: Environmental Risk Assessment and Management (4 credits)
The focus of this course is on the definition, modeling, management, and proper utilization of environmental risk assessments and calculations. Course readings and assignments will examine theoretical modeling, exposure characterization, extrapolation of non-human data for human health protection, calculation of aggregate risk, risk reduction calculations, results-first vs. worst-first management, and hypothetical maximum exposed individual studies. Students will be expected to critically evaluate the limitations and appropriate use of a number of different risk assessment techniques under a variety of case studies.

AET578: Remote Sensing (2 credits)
This course will provide a graduate-level overview of environmental surveillance and modeling using GIS and other remote sensing techniques. Course assignments and readings will examine the use of remote sensing in the study of sea ice, ocean currents, wind and wave patterns, oil spills, forestry, costal development, marine production, urbanization, and desertification. Students will be asked to critically review current research related to a variety of remote sensing techniques.

AET580: Biogeography, Biosystematics and Evolution (4 credits)
This course provides a graduate-level exploration of foundational readings and research in historical biogeography. Course assignments and readings will examine a wide range of topics including speciation, isolating mechanisms, species variation, niche distribution, sub-species classifications, and other fundamental principles of evolution and diversification. Students will examine a variety of examples and assess overall shifts in genetic and species diversity as a response to external stresses within an ecosystem.

AET583: Limnology (4 credits)
This course focuses upon the detailed study of freshwater ecosystems, including the physical and chemical cycles that occur in streams, rivers, and lakes. Students will be asked to explore readings and current research related to the composition and ecosystem dynamics of organisms within these bodies of water and to examine their effects on pollution of freshwater systems and cycles. Permission of the instructor is required to enroll in this course.

AET591: Applied Environmental Chemistry (6 credits)
This course provides a detailed examination into the chemistry of environmental phenomena, pollution interactions, and remediation technologies. Students will be asked to undertake a major project related to a particular pollutant, waste-generating process, or remediation scenario. Through literature reviews, critical analysis of current research methods, and professional consultations, the student will be asked to fully explore the approved topic and propose unique chemical or process solutions to address negative environmental impacts associated with the particular issue. Completion of ELS552 or its equivalent, and permission of the instructor is required before enrolling in this course. Course project topics must be approved in advance of registration.

AET592L Environmental Management in Ocean and Coastal Areas (4 credits)
This course presents an exploration of development, management, and economic utilization of coastal zone areas and ocean resources. Course assignments and readings will focus on the nature, extent, and value of coastal and ocean areas; water-based utility analyses; recreation resources; water quality; environmental degradation; ocean and coastal water regulation; fishery resources; mineral and petroleum extraction; and remediation/rehabilitation issues. Students will be asked to examine the impacts of human activity and economic exploitation on the sustainability of these ecosystems. Completion of EPS525 is recommended but not required for enrollment in this course.

Return to Course Directory

EPS 500: Global Citizenship: Thinking With Nature. (3 credit)
This short course is offered to students when required or suggested by their department, or by the student's personal choice during any period semester of enrollment or application. It may also be used as a student facilitator training internship once the student has completed the course. Students discover how our excessive separation from nature stresses our sensuous inner nature and initiates our personal and global troubles. Students learn to reverse this destructive process by mastering thoughtful sensory nature reconnecting activities that dissolve stress by satisfying our deepest natural loves, wants, and spirit. This hands-on course teaches lasting leadership, education, counseling, and mental health skills that feelingly tap the "higher power" wisdom of Earth's creation process. The email and telephone contacts of the course empower students to let nature help them nurture warm interpersonal relationships, wellness, and responsibility on personal and global levels. Students relate the course methods and materials to their fields of interest in order to integrate these areas with the global ecosystem. They become familiar with the Natural Systems Thinking Process and improve their Globally Balanced Thinking Score.

EPS 501 Educating and Counseling with Nature (3 credits)
Students learn to promote, teach and research personal, social and environmental responsibility by mastering and adapting unique "nature-connecting" teaching methods for personal and professional use. They discover how to teach first-hand, tangible, reconnection with nature contacts that provide information and satisfy deep natural wants. Students discover how, when unsatisfied, these wants disrupt inner peace and fuel personal, cultural and ecological disorders. Under the direction of the instructor, students establish and identify a two or more person class of students with whom they work online and/or onsite. They maintain a journal of their teaching and research efforts and prepare a 5 page reflective paper.











Applied Psychology
Integrative Psychology
Business Administration
Engineering and Technology
Economic Development
Environmental Studies
Applied Ecopsychology
Educational Leadership
TESOL Literacy
Public Health Administration
Complementary and Alternative Medicine -CAM
Integral Health Studies
Sustainability Studies
Peace, Diplomacy, and International Relations
Transpersonal Psychology
Natural Health Program
Professional Studies
University Center
Degree Programs
Honoris Causa Program
Community and Continuing Education

Access Newsletter

Contribute News

Link to Akamai on Facebook


Akamai University is internationally accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC). The University has earned Premier status with ASIC for its commendable areas of operation. ASIC is an approved accrediting body for the purposes of compliance by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) is a member of the British Quality Foundation (BQF), sits on the Quality Standards Group of UK NARIC, and is one of a number of international accrediting bodies listed in the international directory by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) in the USA and is a member of the CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG).

Akamai University
187 Kino`ole Street
Hilo, Hawaii 96720 USA