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Center-CBED

COURSE OFFERINGS

Business Administration
International Business
Nonprofit Administration
Small Business Development
Entrepreneurship for Women
Community and Economic Development
Applied Information Technology

Degree Requirements
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BUSINESS AND CORPORATE ADMINISTRATION

BUS 500: Readings in Business Administration (3 credits)
Students pursue detailed readings in the theories, principles and practices of business and economic development. Individualized reading projects might include studies in banking and finance, business management, entrepreneurial studies, business communications, business ethics, human resource management, logistics and materials management. Topics might also include management information systems, financial management and accounting, distribution management, operations management, organizational behavior, purchasing and procurement, security and loss protection, business law, and contracts, marketing and finance, labor relations. Course intended for Master's students.

BUS 502: History of Economics (3 credits)
This course examines the history of economics over the past two centuries. Topics address development of the principal schools of economic theory including social, polictical and philosophical impacts upon economic theories. Students will address the main works of Malthus, J.S. Mill, Marx, Keynes and Galbraith and others.

BUS 504: Microeconomic Principles (3 credits)
Students analyze the impact of individual decision making units and the consequential behaviors of individual firms, corporations and industries in the economy. Students will examine microeconomic theory and analysis and decision-making functions of individual and collective economic units. Topics explore income distribution, labor market, poverty and discrimination, welfare economics, and market failures. Topics also address the firm and its production and costs, market structure, consumer choice and demand analysis.

BUS 506: Macroeconomic Principles (3 credits)
Students address classical models of macroeconomic thought in assesing the economy as a whole and the critical factors impacting economic problems. Topics evaluate the works of economists such as John Maynard Keynes and others and investigate how overall levels of employment, production and growth are determined in an economy and of how interactions among nations influence activity worldwide. Topics also explore financial markets, consumption, savings, and investment, the labor market and inflation, theories of long range growth, and business cycles with focus upon the national income, unemployment, inflation, the balance of payments, exchange rates, money, and macroeconomic policy.

BUS 508: Agribusiness (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide a conceptual and practical knowledge of agribusiness systems, finance, marketing, and human relations and applies these concepts to the agribusiness firm. Students also explore the impact of agribusiness upon the environment and relative to international economic development.

BUS 510: Industrial and Labor Relations (3 credits)
The course covers workplace aspects of industrial and labor relations within a legal and institutional framework. Topics link industrial relations and labor management practices with broader issues of economic policy, wage and labor policy, efficiency and productivity.

BUS 510: Business Impact on the Environment (3 credits)
Students examine the application of economic principles to the management of the environment, and addresses the importance of conventional business attitudes that lead to environmental degradation and resource depletion. Topics address the cost of environmental protection and ways to achieve efficient and sustainable use of environmental resources such as energy, minerals, water, forests and fisheries. Students study international economic perspectives on problems such as the loss of biodiversity, the exploitation of animals, the pollution of water, air and soil, global warming, and the threat to the ozone layer.

BUS 512: Urban Economics (3 credits)
This course covers the fundamentals in the economic management of metropolitan areas. Topics address the evolution of cities, the importance of- housing and transport policies, land use planning and government finance.

BUS 514: Labor Market Economics (3 credits)
This course evaluates the interaction of economic theory and the operation of the labor market. Topics cover issues of labor supply and demand, human capital theory, labor market operation and segmentation, trade unions, unemployment and the distribution of income.

BUS 516: Manpower Training (3 credits)
This course examines formal and informal approaches to manpower training and development. Topics explore the history of human capital development, the effectiveness of varying industry and government approaches to manpower development.

BUS 518: Econometric Theories and Forecasting (3 credits)
This course addresses applied econometric techniques including forecasting, estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression, interpretation and evaluation of regression models, non-linear modeling, heteroscedasticity, auto-correlation, multicollinearity and specification error, and the use of categorical or qualitative data in regression models.

BUS 520: Financial Management and Accounting (3 credits)
This course addresses budgeting methods and processes, management and control, , investment decisions, capital management, and long term financial decision-making. Topics examine financial and management accounting, managerial decision making and finance issues. Students explore bookkeeping and accounting for business transactions and assets and liabilities, determining profit, measuring financial performance, interpreting accounting information, costs, working capital, budgeting and financial planning.

BUS 522: Public Economics (3 credits)
Students analyze economic public policy theories. Topics cover theories of government behavior and regulation, cost-benefit analysis, privatization and corporatization, applications of public expenditure analysis in transport, education and health, welfare policies of government. Students also examine the nature of the public sector, the state, welfare economics and the role of government in the economy, economic growth, theoretical and applied public economics and theoretical issues of tax systems, functions of taxation, optimal tax theory, and issues in tax reform .

BUS 524: Economics of Information and Uncertainty (3 credits)
This course examines the theories of uncertainty and information. Students explore individual behavior and market equilibrium in the absence of certainty. Topics investigate choice under uncertainty, game theory, games with incomplete information, auctions, principal-agent models, social choice theory, mechanism design and its applications to regulation.

BUS 530: Financial Strategies and Decision-making (3 credits)
This course investigates theory and practice of financial management from a corporate perspective. Topics cover financial management objectives, principles of capital investment, project evaluation techniques, capital structure decisions, financing techniques, dividend policy, working capital management and elements of risk management. Students explore issues of debt and equity, authority, misrepresentation and misleading deceptive conduct, market regulation, fund raising provisions of corporation law, dispute resolution, insolvency, and consumer credit, corporate treasury management, domestic and cross-border mergers and acquisitions, corporate risk modeling, commercial property management, financial ethics and codes of conduct, long-term corporate financing strategies, and international funds investment. Topics also include capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, taxation and financial decision making, corporate funding sources, international financial management issues, valuation techniques, and financial management policies.

BUS 532: Hospitality Management and Tourism (3 credits)
This course covers the operation and management of hospitality industries as a business and cultural process. Topics investigate hospitality and tourism and its effectiveness in furthering intercultural understanding.

BUS 536: Health Economics (3 credits)
This course examines techniques of health economics and evaluation. Topics cover research, bioethics and epidemiology.

BUS 600: Readings in Corporate and Business Administration (3 credits)
Students pursue detailed readings in the theories, principles and practices of business and economic development. Individualized reading projects might include studies in banking and finance, business management, entrepreneurial studies, business communications, business ethics, human resource management, logistics and materials management. Topics might also include management information systems, financial management and accounting, distribution management, operations management, organizational behavior, purchasing and procurement, security and loss protection, business law, and contracts, marketing and finance, labor relations. . Course intended for Doctoral students.

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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

INB 500: Readings in International Commerce (3 credits)
Students pursue detailed readings in the theories, principles and practices of international commerce. Individualized reading projects might include international business, international economics, trade and treaties, international finance, and international business law. Course intended for Master's students.

INB 502: International Economics (3 credits)
This course covers global trade and international monetary theories. Students examine tariffs and other trade-restricting devices, trade blocs and global trading problems. Topics include trade determination theories, theories of exchange rate, problems of the international monetary system, evaluation of monetary, fiscal and exchange rate policies, inflation and unemployment, effects of exchange rate changes, and international interdependence and policy coordination.

INB 504: Global Trade and Finance (3 credits)
Students investigate global trade relations and finance in economic context. Topics cover the basis of trade, exchange rate analysis, trade regulation, economic balance, and national export performance. Students also review the significance of the national foreign debt, World Bank intervention, international credit ratings, the containment of corruption, international property rights, multinational tax policy coordination, exchange rate management, export performance and foreign debt management.

INB 506: Transformation of Global Markets (3 credits)
This course explores the global business environment, and investigates the elements of building the global organization, managing strategic alliances, organizational transformation and change, managing across cultures, communicating in multicultural teams and global organization in the networked digital economy. Topics also include techniques for organizational transformation, new Internet-enabled business models, E-business, building and managing global brands, and global supply chain management.

INB 510: International Taxation (3 credits)
Students investigate economic and policy issues of taxation in the global community. Students investigate international business and taxation law and the taxation policies from the perspectives of underdeveloped and developing countries, and the leading economic powers.

INB 512: Electronic Commerce (3 credits)
Students address issues and problems in the international framework for electronic commerce. Students investigate computerized trading systems, systems control and security, electronic funds transfer, automatic product identification, data security issues, electronic payment systems, Internet marketing and legal issues in electronic commerce.

INB 514: Diplomacy and Trade (3 credits)
This course addresses diplomacy and trade from the perspective of contemporary international politics. Topics evaluate international law and environmental law policies, public management and policy, ad development of diplomats, and the importance of international development organizations.

INB 516: International Marketing Strategies (3 credits)
Students examine strategies for marketing products and services across the global community. Topics review the political, legal and cultural factors across the international arena including understanding the international marketing environment, conducting international market research and carrying out business transactions across national borders.

INB 518: International Accounting (3 credits)
The course covers international accounting including the influence of environmental, cultural, political and managerial factors on the development of accounting theory and practice.

INB 520: International Business Management (3 credits)
This course covers the essentials of international business management and the competitive advantage of "going global." Students examine problems of international strategy, alliances, acquisitions, corporate cultures, and the challenge of diversity.

INB 522: Strategic Planning in the Worldwide Marketplace (3 credits)
This course evaluates management frameworks for effective strategic planning across the global arena. Topics cover the global monetary exchange, barriers to trade, diplomacy, strategic exploitation of trade opportunities, international financial resources, and markets in underdeveloped countries.

INB 524: United States Economic Systems (3 credits)
Students examine the principal features of the United States economy including postwar economic history, the American corporation, international trade and international finance, foreign investment, the agricultural sector, distribution, education, health, environmental and living conditions. Students also explore the emergence of women and minority group members in corporate leadership and the importance of ethical principles in the modern corporation.

INB 526: The Economy of Japan (3 credits)
This course addresses the principal features of the Japanese economy including postwar economic history, industrial policy, the Japanese corporation, international trade and international finance. Topics also examine foreign investment, the agricultural sector, distribution, education, health, environmental and living conditions from the Japanese perspective.

INB 528: Economics of the European Union (3 credits)
This course examines key economic issues affecting the successful integration of the European Union, and examines their effect on member countries. Topics explore the economic performance and policies of the European Union.

INB 530: Transitioning Asian Economies (3 credits)
Students examine the varying levels of success in transitioning Asian economies. Topics explore the economies of Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, China and Vietnam. Topics examine macro and microeconomic factors including influences of government, business and labor, problems of economic development, agricultural development, problems in industrialization, foreign trade and the process of regional integration.

INB 532: The Role of Gender in Globalization (3 credits)
This course investigates the role of gender in globalization. Students investigates the movements in organizing for workers' rights and women's rights. Topics focus on labor migration, the international political economy of sex, and transnational political organizing for women's and workers' rights, and the role of women in development.

INB 600: Readings in International Commerce (3 credits)
Students pursue detailed readings in the theories, principles and practices of international commerce. Individualized reading projects might include international business, international economics, trade and treaties, international finance, and international business law. Course intended for Doctoral students.

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NOT-FOR-PROFIT ADMINISTRATION

NPM 500: Review of Literature in Nonprofit Management (3 credits)
Students pursue contemporary scholarly literature covering essential theories, principles and practices in nonprofit management [Instructor to be appointed]

NPM 501: Theory and Practice of Nonprofit Organizations (3 credits)
This course examines the theoretical foundations, structures, and processes of nonprofit organizations. Topics explore historical development and impact, and the social, political, legal, and economic environment in which nonprofit organizations exist. Students will also study the complexities of organizational governance confronted by volunteer and professional administrators.

NPM 502: Organizational Policy for Nonprofits (3 credits)
This course studies the role of organizational strategy and its relation to policy formation within nonprofit organizations. Topics examine methods used for strategy analysis, how to relate to organizations with missions overlapping one's own, and how to develop sound organizational policy recommendations in all functional areas of the organization.

NPM 503: Strategic Management for Nonprofit Organizations (3 credits)
Students examine proactive nonprofit management with focus upon establishing meaningful management strategies toward achieving the organizational mission. Topics examine the means for understanding of the organization's mission, objectives and resources, efficient use of scarce resources in service to the nonprofit mission, structuring program objectives toward a well-crafted vision, and selecting management strategies to enhance coordination across organizational units.

NPM 505: The Nonprofit Executive Director (3 credits)
This course analyzes the roles and responsibilities of nonprofit Executive Director. Topics examine techniques for recruiting and retaining Executive Directors, building meaningful job specifications, and building proper systems for institutional policy development. Special attention is given to the tasks of strategic planning and strategic restructuring, evaluation of the work of the Executive Director and formal monitoring and accountability of management.

NPM 506: The Nonprofit Board of Directors (3 credits)
This course will investigate the roles and responsibilities of the nonprofit board of directors as the organization?s governing body. Topics will examine the role and function of individual board members and explore strategies for increasing board effectiveness. Students will study the particular roles of board officers, committees, stakeholder representation and diversity in the context of a given organization's needs.

NPM 511: Nonprofit Financial Management (3 credits)
This course addresses budgeting methods and processes, management and control, reports and record keeping, and financial decision-making for nonprofit organizations. Topics examine financial and management accounting, managerial decision-making and finance issues. Students explore basic principles of managerial accounting, fund accounting, budgeting, budgetary control cash-flow analysis, expenditure control, long-range financial planning, audits, grants, and contracts, and measurement of financial performance.

NPM 512: Accounting for Nonprofit Managers (3 credits)
This course examines the concepts and terminology of financial accountability in the nonprofit sector. Topics include financial accountability aspects for forming, structuring, planning and budgeting, fundraising, accounting, managing, record keeping and reporting for the nonprofit organization.

NPM 514: Resources and Development in Nonprofit Administration (3 credits)
This course reviews the principles and practices of fundraising and development for nonprofit organizations. Topics examine planning the campaign and successful strategies; identifying sources of support, promotional campaigns and public relations, and management issues including recruiting and managing volunteers. Students investigate proper procedures in acquisition and maintenance of resources.

NPM 515: Management Information Systems (3 credits)
This course consists of a study of information systems within nonprofit organizations and the use of automation and software to improve those systems for management decision-making.

NPM 516: Marketing Management for Nonprofit Organizations (3 credits)
This course will examine the basic elements of the marketing process for nonprofit organizations. Topics examine the key elements of a marketing plan, public relations and building an image for a nonprofit organization and use of the media. Participants increase their ability to develop and implement a marketing plan, including the effective use of external resources to achieve organizational goals

NPM 519: The Director of Development (3 credits)
This course focuses the role of the Director of Development within the nonprofit organization. Topics examine the skills needed for fundraising and development and in building the conceptual fundraising framework for the organization.

NPM 525: Organizational Assessment for Nonprofits (3 credits)
This course examines the assessment theories and evaluation practices for assessment of nonprofit organizations and programs with cross-cultural perspectives.

NPM 531: Nonprofit Human Resource Management (3 credits)
This course encompasses the study of the management of human resources within nonprofit organizations with consideration for agency and community size and population perspectives. Topics study the processes of administrative decisions and policy making regarding effective management of employees and volunteers in nonprofit organizations. Students examine recruitment, staff development, performance evaluation, and legal and affirmative action issues.

NPM 532: Human Behavior in Non-Governmental Organizations (3 credits)
This course explores structure, processes, and change from the perspective of organizational behavior and management within non-governmental organizations.

NPM 541: Legal Issues in the Nonprofit Sector (3 credits)
This course analyzes the principal legal issues affecting nonprofit organizations. Topics include liability, contracts, procedures related to boards of directors and members, employment law, incorporation and bylaws, tax exemption and reporting requirements, and political advocacy. Principal relations between nonprofit organizations and federal, state, and local government, and relationships with funding sources are studied.

NPM 551: Affiliations, Coalitions and Partnerships (3 credits)
This course studies the essential role of affiliations, coalitions and partnerships among nonprofit organizations, business, government, and charitable agencies in solving major community and international problems. Topics will examine prerequisites for successful partnerships, overcoming partnership constraints, building participatory partnership structures and methods for evaluating partnerships.

NPM 600: Review of Literature in Nonprofit Management (3 credits)
Students pursue contemporary scholarly literature covering essential theories, principles and practices in nonprofit management [Instructor to be appointed]

NPM 791: Selected Topics in Nonprofit Management (3 credits)
This course provides students with opportunities for directed study in advanced selected aspects of the discipline under the direction of qualified faculty. Students pursue advanced readings in approved subject areas, conduct library and online searches for existing academic literature, conduct field investigations on the topic and prepare scholarly papers. This course may be repeated as NPM 792, provided the scholarly topics are non-duplicative. [Instructor to be appointed]

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SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

MGT 500: Readings in Management and Entrepreneurial Studies (3 credits)
Students pursue detailed readings in the theories and principles of business management and entrepreneurial practices. Individualized reading projects might include studies in banking and finance, business management, entrepreneurial studies, business communications, business ethics, human resource management, logistics and materials management. Topics might also include management information systems, financial management and accounting, distribution management, operations management, organizational behavior, purchasing and procurement, security and loss protection, business law, and contracts, marketing and finance, labor relations. Course designed for Master's students.

MGT 600: Readings in Management and Entrepreneurial Studies (3 credits)
Students pursue detailed readings in the theories and principles of business management and entrepreneurial practices. Individualized reading projects might include studies in banking and finance, business management, entrepreneurial studies, business communications, business ethics, human resource management, logistics and materials management. Topics might also include management information systems, financial management and accounting, distribution management, operations management, organizational behavior, purchasing and procurement, security and loss protection, business law, and contracts, marketing and finance, labor relations. Course designed for Doctoral students.

MGT 502: Database Management (3 credits)
Student investigate the principles of relational database management systems (RDBMS) and their application to business. Topics include database design, object databases, decision support systems, parallel and distributed systems, deductive and active databases, data modeling and implementing the derived models using tables.

MGT 504: Statistics for Management (3 credits)
This course examines the business applications of probability and statistics. Topics cover data analysis, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and simple linear regression as part of statistical inference for decision making. Students explore application of these techniques to the problems of business, finance, economics, management, information technology and social sciences both within the domestic and global business environment. Students may use Excel for statistical analysis.

MGT 506: Logistics Management (3 credits)
This course explores the business supply chain and the management of logistics. Topics include transportation, warehousing facilities and equipment, use of computers in logistics, and international logistic issues.

MGT 508: Alternative Dispute Resolution (3 credits)
This course presents business uses of alternative dispute resolution including mediation in business and civil disputes, arbitration, and the art of negotiation.

MGT 510: Management in the Face of Change (3 credits)
Students investigate effective management of organizations operating in unpredictable and rapidly changing environments. Topics address management theory and leadership, human resource management, employee relations, leadership, management advancement and development, operations, strategy, systems thinking and organizational learning, and total quality management. Students consider the international perspectives of management including the global organization, cross-cultural management, workplace cultures, organizational restructuring, and new patterns of work design.

MGT 512: Management Information Systems (3 credits)
This course examines management information systems. Topics explore computer-based information systems in business, management of information technology, operation of software packages and use of databases in managerial decisions.

MGT 514: Quality Management (3 credits)
This course covers the history, theories, principles, and practices of quality management. Topics evaluate the complexities of building a total quality management program within a business organization. Students examine issues of global planning, implementation, achievement and maintenance of a quality program and the benefits and costs associated with implementation of quality management systems.

MGT 516: Business Law (3 credits)
Students examine the international legal system and its influence in the business world from the perspectives of business managers and the obligations that international laws may impose upon them. Topics address the framework of the legal system, legal process and the basic principles of contracts, sales of goods, torts, company law, trade practices law and administrative law.

MGT 518: Addressing Workplace Diversity (3 credits)
Students address the complexities of increasing diversity in the workplace and the challenges facing business managers. Topics examine the foundations and demographics of differing cultural groups, and the contemporary legislation shaping the work environment.

MGT 520: Strategic Policy Formation (3 credits)
This course addresses methods of strategy analysis in organizations and establishment of sound organizational policies in all functional areas of the organization. Topics explore the organizational mission, effective techniques for policy formation and the role of the general administrator.

MGT 522: Organizational Assessment (3 credits)
This course covers the leading theories and methods of assessing the effectiveness of organizations and programs. Extensive review of case studies helps students analyze the evaluation practices of organizations throughout the world.

MGT 524: Management for Change (3 credits)
This course examines important theories related to managing change in the workplace. Topics investigate contemporary cultural change, the new information society, and the necessity for re-engineering within the work organization. Students study the elements and methodologies for successful business and corporate re-engineering through extensive case student review. Topics also may include exploration of the concepts of work redesign and implementation and different approaches to managing the relationships between people and the work they perform. Students conduct a comparative analysis of two work organizations or document and analyze an employer-specific use of selected course concepts.

MGT 530: Performance Management (3 credits)
This course examines the concept of performance management within organizations. Topics cover theories and applications of performance management and effective data collection techniques.

MGT 532: Human Resource Management (3 credits)
This course examines the strategic contribution of human resource management to successful organizations. Topics address the attainment of competitive advantage by application of effective people skills, the human resources cycle (selection, performance appraisal, rewards, and development); mental mastery (systems thinking, mental modeling, shared vision, and team learning); trust; empowerment; corporate governance; and the role of transformational leadership.

MGT 534: Ethical Theories for Business (3 credits)
This course evaluates methods for making informed ethical decisions within the workplace and marketplace including the concepts of moral motivation and respecting persons, duties, moral rights and prima facie principles. Topics cover the consequentialist moral theory of utilitarianism, the principle of the "greatest happiness for the greatest number" and Kant's non-consequentialist ethics of the categorical imperative.

MGT 538: Executive Decision-Making (3 credits)
This course examines the art and science of decision making for executives including the study of basic logic and the principal decision making models (problem analysis and question formation, data gathering methods, development and assessment of alternative solutions, and managing decision making in organizations).

MGT 540: Productivity in the Workplace (3 credits)
This course evaluates the theories, methods, and concepts of producing a highly productive workplace. Topics explore the systems approach for workplace transformation and issues of motivation in work organizations (drives, needs, outcomes, satisfaction, behavior, bases for decision to work in an organization, extrinsic rewards, job performance, and interpersonal influences). MGT 542: Human Behavior in Organizations (3 credits)
This course examines the prerequisite human sensitivities and psychology necessary to effectively deal with the human challenges within the workplace. Topics review the perspectives of the individual, interaction between individuals and the organization as a whole. Students study the internal dynamics of organizations and the role of organizations in the broader social, political and economic environment. Topics also review issues of efficiency and effectiveness in organizations in both the private and public sectors and consider ethical issues that arise in managing organizations.

MGT 544: Discrimination in the Workplace (3 credits)
This course examines civil liberties and discrimination in the workplace including affirmative action and sexual harassment in the workplace. Topics cover rights and moral regard for employees, ethical concerns in practices of hiring, firing, promotion, discipline and wage systems. Students explore the use of personality tests, drugs testing and other sorts of monitoring, health and safety issues, along with styles of management, the needs of employees with children, and job satisfaction. MGT 546: Global Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
This course covers the issues of entrepreneurship in the global business environment. Topics examine the impact of religio-cultural, social, political, military, and regional economic forces upon the entrepreneurial process in the global business environment.

MGT 548: Individual Financial Planning (3 credits)
This course covers the principles and components of individual financial planning. Topics explore finances, investment research and planning, portfolios, markets, funds, stocks, brokers, bankers, financial tools, retirement, budgeting, insurance, taxes, and online and community-based financial planning resources.

MGT 550: Public Management (3 credits)
This course examines management of government agencies and departments, statutory corporations and other publicly owned and controlled enterprises. Topics address federal, state and local government bodies, relations among levels of government, and division of governmental powers. Students address roles of federal, state and local government, administrative law, policy-making, human resource management, budgetary and financial management, and the issue of reform, government accountability and efficiency. Topics also review non-profit accounting and reporting practices, budgetary control and internal reporting, principles of fund accounting, endowment fund accounting, management, and performance assessment.

MGT 554: Investments and Risk (3 credits)
This course explores investment decision-making and financial techniques to manage financial risk. Topics cover financial securities, interest, expected return, risk, risk aversion and diversification of investments, valuation of bonds and common stocks and portfolio management.

MGT 556: Organizational Development and Transformation (3 credits)
This course covers the history of organizational development theory from its foundations in psychology and education. Topics explore techniques for assisting organizations improve themselves. Students investigate transformational considerations in emerging models of business, community systems, and the growing importance of individual consciousness and, cross-cultural awareness.

MGT 558: Leadership in Management (3 credits)
This course compares historical and contemporary theories of effective leadership. Topics include the concepts of power and influence, ethics in decision making, multicultural workforce issues, participatory and networked leadership models.

MGT 562: Theories of the Paradigm Shift (3 credits)
This course covers the theoretical principles that underlie the process of organizational change and paradigm shift.

MGT 564: Cultural Implications of Paradigm Shift (3 credits)
This course investigates how shifts in understanding of different paradigms impacts on choices made in the marketplace, social institutions, and in our personal lives.

MGT 565: Philosophical Perspectives in Paradigm Studies (3 credits)
This course addresses the philosophical perspectives of paradigm shift. Topics emphasize the philosophical interpretation of the physical world as defined by the Newtonian and New Scientific Paradigms and other historical paradigms.

MGT 566: Creativity and Systemic Change (3 credits)
Students examine the creative process as it relates to systemic change and transition. Topics address the ways in which the mind and brain sort through data, make sense of these data, and permit creative and "quantum" leaps in thinking in order to look at issues and problems in novel ways.

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COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

CED 503: Growth in Underdeveloped Countries (3 credits)
Students examine the characteristics of under-developed countries, and the relative importance to sustainable development of population pressures, income distribution, agricultural processes, industrialization, the role of foreign investment, alternative technology, trade, aid, and manpower development.

CED 504: Poverty Reduction Models (3 credits)
This course addresses principles of banking and finance, the economics of poverty and community development. Topics review socio-economic aspects of poverty and the application of micro-finance models in poverty reduction. Students investigate the role of the state and alternative strategies and paradigms of development

CED 507: Facilitating Development Projects (3 credits)
This course explores planning and managerial issues in economic development projects. Topics focus upon evaluating project environments, selecting appropriate team members, and managing the project. Students cover the project cycle from identification, feasibility and design, to appraisal, financing and budgeting, through implementation, monitoring and evaluation, paying special attention to the need to be sensitive to local circumstances and needs.

CED 508: Social Impacts of Development (3 credits)
This course addresses the relationships between society and development, the techniques needed to undertake social impact assessments and to understand the details of these findings. Topics explore community consultation and dispute resolution, the relationship between economic restructuring and social impacts of development, quantitative and qualitative social survey techniques needed to undertake social impact assessments and the preparation of professional reports and assessments.

CED 512: NGO's and Development (3 credits)
Students investigate the role of non-government organizations (NGOs) in third-world development campaigns. Topics integrate economic, cultural, political, religious and ethnic concerns with the role of NGO's in the development arena.

CED 514: Organizational Policy for Nonprofits (3 credits)
This course studies the role of organizational strategy and its relation to policy formation within nonprofit organizations. Topics examine methods used for strategy analysis, how to relate to organizations with missions overlapping one's own, and how to develop sound organizational policy recommendations in all functional areas of the organization.

CED 515: Resources and Development in NGO Administration (3 credits)
This course reviews the principles and practices of fundraising and development for nonprofit organizations. Topics examine planning the campaign and successful strategies; identifying sources of support, promotional campaigns and public relations, and management issues including recruiting and managing volunteers. Students investigate proper procedures in acquisition and maintenance of resources.

CED 516: Legal Issues in the NGO Sector (3 credits)
This course analyzes the principal legal issues affecting nonprofit organizations. Topics include liability, contracts, procedures related to boards of directors and members, employment law, incorporation and bylaws, tax exemption and reporting requirements, and political advocacy. Principal relations between nonprofit organizations and federal, state, and local government, and relationships with funding sources are studied.

CED 520: Gender, Environment & Development (3 credits)
This course addresses the gender and environmental complexities relative to theory and practice of development, theories of social change and development in the light of challenges to traditional goals of development (economic growth, poverty alleviation, and social justice).

CED 522: Environmental Impact Assessment (3 credits)
This course explores the impact of political activities for development upon natural and cultural systems and how detrimental human impacts on the environment might be mitigated. Students explore the political and social systems through which they might construct practical solutions and treatments for ecological problems. Topics cover the theory and practice of environmental impact assessment, the characteristics of ecosystems that are most sensitive to change, and rates of change in ecosystems. Students pursue case studies from the development field of particular environmental problems from a number of ecosystems.

CED 524: Economics of Sustainable Development (3 credits)
This course addresses the sustainability of current development paths. Topics evaluate the importance of natural resources, social-cultural influences, new technologies, and policy directions for sustainable development. Students examine mathematical growth models, fundamental principles of development, policy issues relative to the growth performance in developing countries.

CED 525: Agriculture in Third-World Development (3 credits)
This course investigates the importance of agriculture to the sustainable development of the third world. Topics cover the relative contributions of various methods of agriculture and the impact of global agriculture to the development of the third world.

CED 526: Aid, Trade and Development (3 credits)
This course examines the dominant themes and policy issues on aid and trade in third-world development. Topics examine the importance of sustainability, self-sufficiency, and efficacy to the economy development of third world countries within the global arena.

CED 551: Affiliations, Coalitions and Partnerships (3 credits)
This course studies the essential role of affiliations, coalitions and partnerships among nonprofit organizations, business, government, and charitable agencies in solving major community and international problems. Topics will examine prerequisites for successful partnerships, overcoming partnership constraints, building participatory partnership structures and methods for evaluating partnerships.

CED 572: Field Methods for Development Projects (3 credits)
This course examines the major concerns of field project management. Topics include participatory planning, community motivation, equity and empowerment, political and cultural context, capacity building, organizational analysis and social sustainability. Students will assess the relative effectiveness of techniques such as survey, focus groups and ethnography with reflection upon local circumstances and needs.

CED 589: Participatory Action for Development Projects (3 credits)
Students will investigate the available literature on participatory research techniques. This may include readings in the literature pertaining to implementing system-transforming innovations, participatory action for the workplace, reframing organizational culture, and self-reliant initiatives, as well as other qualitative and action science methodologies. Students will identify an appropriate mini-study, apply techniques from their readings, complete the study and prepare a technical paper of at least ten double-spaced typewritten pages referencing the literature and describing the value of participatory research techniques to the success of development projects.

CED 591: Practicum in Community and Economic Development (3 credits)
The goal of the field study is to investigate core aspects of community and economic development an economic recovery within the real world environment through close contact with practitioners and challenging situations. Student participation should cover a minimum of 50 hours of contact and is expected to afford students appropriate practical hands-on experience and in-depth knowledge of the field. Students complete a daily journal and prepare a scholarly paper summarizing their findings for field study.

CED 599: Major Project in Community and Economic Development (3 credits)
This course governs the conduct of the major project and is intended to permit the demonstration of the mastery of a body of knowledge in the field of community and economic development or economy recovery. This project may be quantitative, qualitative or participatory action research, or be a major project demonstrating excellence.

BUS 507: Business Research (3 credits)
Participants will examine research tools, techniques, and resources used to development analytical ability and techniques to gather and present data in viable forms of business communication.

BUS 551: Survey of Research Methods (3 credits)
This course inspects he foundational techniques of scholarly research. Topics explore sources of scholarly research literature, proper methods for evaluating research reports, fundamentals of qualitative and quantitative research methods.

RES 552: Understanding Business Journal Articles (3 credits)
This course empowers students in assessing the effectiveness of business research papers from professional journals. Topics investigate the rigor or various research methods, replicability, bias and validity issues, and the appropriateness of statements of findings and recommendations from research. Students study effectiveness and problems in collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data from studies and investigate the applicability and generalization of findings and the proper manner of presenting the details of their own research studies.

BUS 554: Basic Statistics (3 credits)
This course covers the basic statistical concepts, theory and methods in statistical research. Topics include variables, graphs, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, probability theory, binomial, normal and Poisson distributions, statistical sampling theory, and statistical decision theory.

BUS 555: Intermediate Statistics (3 credits)
This course covers parametric and nonparametric hypothesis testing. Topics include sampling theory, Chi-square test, least squares regression, correlation theory, non-linear regression, analysis of variance, Student's t-test, and various methods in nonparametric analyses.

BUS 557: Qualitative Research (3 credits)
This course provides detailed study of qualitative research methods. Topics survey historical and theoretical foundations of qualitative research, explore major qualitative research strategies, and build an understanding of the art and science of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting qualitative information. The course provides background on applied qualitative research, the politics and ethics of qualitative inquiry, and the major paradigms that inform and influence qualitative research.

BUS 559: Participatory Action Research (3 credits)
This course provides the foundational principles of participatory action research. Topics survey theoretical foundations of action research, the methodology and applications of PAR in contemporary culture. Students assess the rigor and usefulness of participatory action research in addressing major world problems.

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Akamai University is internationally accredited by the Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC). The University has earned Premier status with ASIC for its commendable areas of operation. ASIC is an approved accrediting body for the purposes of compliance by the UK Border Agency (UKBA) is a member of the British Quality Foundation (BQF), sits on the Quality Standards Group of UK NARIC, and is one of a number of international accrediting bodies listed in the international directory by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) in the USA and is a member of the CHEA International Quality Group (CIQG).

Akamai University
187 Kino`ole Street
Hilo, Hawaii 96720 USA