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Center-CAPHS


Applied Psychology and Human Services
Master of Science

Introduction
Program Audience
Entry Requirements
Degree Requirements
Program Faculty
Course Descriptions

INTRODUCTION

Alarmingly, throughout the world, the burden of mental illness on health has long been underestimated. Data developed over the past decade by the massive Global Burden of Disease study conducted by the World Health Organization, the World Bank, and Harvard University, has revealed that mental illness, including suicide, accounts for over 15% of the burden of disease in established market economies, such as the United States. This is more than the disease burden caused by all cancers.

Mental disorders are on the increase and expected to represent a major problem of epidemic proportions as the new century progresses. Depression, anxiety, withdrawal, adjustment disorder, bipolar disorder in later life, dementia, delirium, post traumatic stress disorder, personality and delusional disorders are expected to be among the more common afflictions. These disorders, largely brought on by the aging process among an evolving older population, as well as increasing societal stress, grave personal and family difficulties, drug or alcohol abuse and physical health disorders continue to complicate an already difficult situation.

According to the Global Burden of Disease study, major depression ranked second only to heart disease in magnitude of disease burden in established market economies. Depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are among the leading causes of disability worldwide (especially for persons age five and older and among women). Obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder also contributed significantly to the total burden of illness attributable to mental disorders.

These projections show that with the aging of the world population and the conquest of infectious diseases, psychiatric and neurological conditions could increase their share of the total global disease burden by almost half, from 10.5 percent of the total burden to almost 15 percent in 2020. National Institute of Mental Health researchers warn in projections published in the September, 1999 issue of Archives of General Psychiatry that the number of elderly people with mental illness, estimated to be 15 million in 2030, could strain the nation's healthcare system over the next 30 years. Counselors, consciousness researchers, psychotherapists, and neuroscientists are called upon to explore the vast reaches of the human mind for more improved techniques of professional intervention. The emerging methodologies of meditation, dream analysis, hypnosis, drugs, biofeedback, free association, and even brain imaging devices must be better understood and applied within the community and clinical arena. If we are to protect the quality of life and assure continued growth and peaceful development of the global community, psychological research, both clinical and theoretical, must continue to identify more effective methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of mental diseases.

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PROGRAM AUDIENCE

The Applied Psychology and Human services program is designed to serve the needs of professionals currently in, or wishing to enter, and benefit from the field of psychology through the following professions:

  1. Clinical psychologists in counseling centers, independent or group practices, hospitals, or clinics
  2. Counseling psychologists in counseling centers, hospitals, and individual, family or group practices.
  3. Community psychologists, single parent counselors, counselors of at-risk youth and families, domestic violence counselors, Counselors of Returning Offenders
  4. Transpersonal psychologists, contemporary shamanic practitioners, Jungian counselors, archetypal psychologists, mind-body practitioners
  5. Organizational psychologists
  6. Social psychologists, developmental psychologists
  7. Spiritual psychologists, spiritual Counselors and pastoral counselors
  8. Rehabilitation counselors
  9. Employment, career and vocational counselors
  10. Mental health counselors
  11. Experimental or research psychologists, practitioners of contemporary research design, qualitative studies in psychology, and psychological theoreticians and researchers interested in fields such as Jungian Studies, Spiritual Psychology, mind-body relationships, energetics and intuition, psychology of women, mysticism, noetic and gnostic studies, and other contemporary specialties.
  12. Other counseling specialties include multicultural, or gerontological counseling

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
As prerequisites for acceptance to the Master's degree, applicants should have completed the equivalent of a recognized baccalaureate degree in an appropriate field of study and have several years of meaningful professional experience. .A telephone interview with the program director may be required.

The Bachelor’s degree requirement is never waived. However, on occasion well qualified applicants are accepted to the Master's program lacking elements of preparation. Under these conditions, participants would be required to add the missing competencies to their program. Applicants are expected to be proficient in collegiate English language skills. Second language English applicants should submit records of TOEFL examination with scores of 550 minimum. Applicants are expected to have access to a computer, email and the Internet and other outside library resources for the full extent of their program.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Participants in the Master of Science program in Spiritual Psychology complete a minimum of 40 credits above the baccalaureate degree, including the thesis and summary reviews. The coursework requirements include the core elements of the academic major, a major concentration within the major field and research preparation coursework.

Participants also complete a comprehensive examination at the conclusion of the academic coursework, prepare a formal thesis proposal, complete the thesis project, and prepare the manuscript for physical and oral review by faculty.

Core Elements of Academic Major (Required: 18 credits minimum)
Major Concentration (Required: 9 credits minimum)
Research Preparation (Required: 3 credits minimum)
Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)
Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)
Thesis (Required: 4 credits)
Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

Core Elements of the Academic Major
Participants complete core elements of the academic major comprised of 18 credits of mandated studies, as outlined below:

Required:
HSS 500: Advanced Readings in Applied Psychology and Human Services (3 credits)
HSS 510: Helping Skills and Relationships (3 credits)
HUC 530: Perspectives for Understanding Diverse Cultures (3 credits)
SPS 518: Identifying, Developing, and Facilitating Effective Interpersonal Relations (3 credits)
HSS 502: Human Values, Ethics, and Professional Services (3 credits)
HSS 599: Field Studies in Applied Psychology and Human services (3 credits)

Course Descriptions

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Major Concentrations (Required: 9 credits minimum)
Participants complete a major concentration comprised of nine credits of specialized studies selected from one the following concentrations:

Career Development
Community Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Health Psychology
Human Communications
Human Service Studies
Sociology
Social Psychology

Course Descriptions

Career Development (Required: 9 credits)

Required: The following two courses:
CAR 502: Introduction to Career Development (3 credits)
CAR 514: Career Services and Developmental Practices (3 credits)

PLUS: One of the following courses:
CAR 518: Identifying Career Interests, Aptitudes, Job Skills, and Motivated Performance (3 credits)
CAR 530: Job Placement and Improving Performance with Training, Coaching, and Mentoring Strategies (3 credits)
CAR 510: Occupations and Professions (3 credits)
CAR 520: Time Management, Planning, and Organization (3 credits)
CAR 522: Interviewing Techniques and Skills (3 credits)
CAR 528: Designing Employment Programs for Special-Need Clients (3 credits)
CAR 532: Improving Supervisory-Employee Work Relations (3 credits)
CAR 534: Improving Customer and Community Relations (3 credits)
CAR 536: Social-Psychological Approaches to Matching Career Choices With Life Style Changes (3 credits)

Community Psychology (Required: 9 credits)

Required: The following two courses:
COM 502: Foundations of Community Psychology (3 credits)
COM 504: Theories and Practices in Community Psychology (3 credits)

PLUS: three credits selected from the following courses or as otherwise arranged with faculty: COM 506: Identifying, Implementing, and Assessing Social System Changes (3 credits)
COM 516: Developing Programs and Using Resources for Community Services (3 credits)
COM 508: Working with Families, Health, and Child-Care Agencies (3 credits)
COM 510: Working with Public Schools and Colleges (3 credits)
COM 512: Working with Law Enforcement, Youth, and Social Services (3 credits)
COM 514: Working with Leaders, Non-Profits, Leisure Activities, and Volunteers (3 credits)

Developmental Psychology (Required: 9 credits)

Required: The following two courses:
APH 502: Introduction to Developmental Psychology (3 credits)
APH 506: Models and Studies of Life Span Development (3 credits)

PLUS: One of the following courses:
APH 522: Selected Studies and Innovative Activities for Human Development (3 credits)
APH 504: Early Child Development (3 credits) APH 508: Adolescence and Early Adulthood (3 credits)
APH 510: Psychology of Women (3 credits)
APH 512: Psychology of Men (3 credits)
APH 514: Identifying and Nurturing Exceptional Gifts and Talents (3 credits)
APH 516: Interpersonal Relations, Intimacy, and Marriage (3 credits)
APH 518: Human Sexuality (3 credits)
APH 520: Psychology of Aging (3 credits)

Health Psychology (Required: 9 credits)

Required: The following two courses:
HEA 506: Introduction to Health and Wellness (3 credits) HEA 507: Principles and Development of Healthy Individuals (3 credits)

PLUS: One of the following courses:
HEA 509: Stress Management and Life Style Changes (3 credits)
HEA 510: Behavioral Health (3 credits)
HEA 522: Qualitative and Quantitative Assessments of Health Risks and Services (3 credits)
HEA 512: Tobacco Cessation and Life-Time Control (3 credits)
HEA 514: Obesity Issues and Weight-Related Alternatives (3 credits)
HEA 516: Laughter, Play, and Healthy Humor (3 credits)
HEA 518: Improving Mental, Emotional and Social Health (3 credits)
HEA 520: Exercise, Sports, and Individual Performance (3 credits)
HEA 530: Selected Health Topics: New Research on Programs and Services (3 credits)

Human Communications (Required: 9 credits)

Required: The following two courses:
HUC 502: Human Communication (3 credits)
HUC 512: Introduction to Cross-Cultural Communication (3 credits)

PLUS: One of the following courses:
HUC 516: Developing Effective Communication in Relationships (3 credits)
HUC 518: Skills and Resources for Trainers, Supervisors, Coaches, and Consultants (3 credits)
HUC 536: Research and Writing for Publication (3 credits)
HUC 515: Special Forms of Communication: The Case of Hypnosis (3 credits)
HUC 520: Assertiveness, Empathy, Sharing, and Support (3 credits)
HSS 524: Conflict Resolution: Bargaining, Mediation, and Arbitration (3 credits)
HUC 526: Writing for Creativity, Self-Expression, and Clarity in Caring Relationships (3 credits)
HUC 528: Persuasive Communication and the Mass Media (3 credits)
HUC 534: Assessment of Communication Skills (3 credits)

Human Service Studies (Required: 9 credits)

Required: The following two courses:
HSS 500: History of Helping Services (3 credits)
HSS 516: Assessment, Planning, and Implementation of Service Programs (3 credits)
PLUS: One of the following courses:
HSS 504: Employee Relations, Customer Services, and Agency Client Services (3 credits)
HSS 506: Individual Behavior in Organizations (3 credits)
HSS 508: Prevention, Targeted Intervention, and Joint Problem-Solving (3 credits) )
HSS 512: Interviewing Techniques (3 credits) )
HSS 514: Child and Family Services (3 credits) )
HSS 520: Professional Coaching, Training, and Consultation (3 credits) )
HSS 522: How to Help Clients, Groups, and Organizations With Quit-Tobacco Services (3 credits))
HSS 524: How to Help Clients, Groups, and Organizations With Weight-Control Services (3 credits))
HSS 526: Selected Group, Inter-Agency, and Community Organization Services (3 credits) )
HSS 528: Social Planning and Action Research (3 credits))
HSS 530: Developing Resources and Services for Aging Clients (3 credits)

Sociology (Required: 9 credits)

Required: The following two courses:
SOC 501: Introduction to Sociology: Theory, Methods, and Applications (3 credits)
SOC 502: Leadership and Team Building in Diverse Social Settings (3 credits)
)
PLUS: One of the following courses:
SOC 506: Sociology of the Small Group: Theories, Methods, and Research (3 credits)
SOC 507: Social Influence, Leadership, and Interpersonal Behavior (3 credits)
SOC 508: Social Problems: Violence, Drugs, and Crime (3 credits)
SOC 510: Culture and Personality (3 credits)
SOC 512: Minority-Majority Group Relations, Prejudice, and Discrimination (3 credits)
SOC 514: Group Dynamics: Methods and Applications (3 credits)
SOC 516: Hate Crimes, Intergroup Aggression, and Terrorism (3 credits)
SOC 518: Social Research Methods (3 credits)
S0C 519: Social Organizational Development and Behavioral Applications (3 credits)
SOC 522: Advanced Studies in Sociology: Theories, Methods, and Research Applications (3 credits)
SOC 526: Sociology of Religion (3 credits)
SOC 528: Gerontology (3 credits)

Social Psychology (Required: 9 credits)

Required: The following two courses:
SPS 503: Introduction to Social Psychology: Theories, Methods, and Research (3 credits)
SPS 506: Role Expectations, Self Identity, and Behavioral Change (3 credits)
)
PLUS: One of the following courses:
SPS 508: Social Perception and Cognition (3 credits)
SPS 510: Personality: Traits, States, and Behavioral Styles (3 credits)
SPS 512: Social and Emotional Intelligence (3 credits)
SPS 514: Motivation: Achievement, Creativity, and Participatory Problem-Solving (3 credits)
SPS 516: Developing Social Interaction Skills (3 credits)
SPS 520: Team Building (3 credits)
SPS 522: Social Psychology of Health and Wellness (3 credits)
SPS 521: Social Psychology of Personal Development (3 credits)
SPS 523: Social Psychology of Creativity (3 credits)
SPS 524: Social Psychology of Stress Management (3 credits)
SPS 525: Social Psychology of Addictions (3 credits)
SPS 526: Social Psychology of Tobacco Use and Cessation for Life (3 credits)
SPS 527: Social Psychology of Obesity and Weight-Related Problems (3 credits)
SPS 528: Social Psychology of the Organization (3 credits)
SPS 530: Social Research Methods in Social Psychology (3 credits)
SPS 532: Advanced Studies in Social Psychology: Theories, Methods, and Research Applications (3 credits)
SPS 533: Systematic Behavioral Observation and Field Research Methods (3 credits)

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Research Preparation
Master's students must pursue studies providing advanced research knowledge necessary for success in their final projects (thesis). At least three semester credits of research preparation coursework is required and this might focus upon quantitative and qualitative methods or participatory action research techniques including subject selection, research design, and statistical analysis, as appropriate to each student’s proposed project.

Through this requirement, students learn to effectively define applied problems or theoretical issues and articulate the rationale for the study. They should learn to present an effective scholarly review of the academic literature and implement quantitative, qualitative or participatory action methods for evaluating academic issues.

Required:
RES 500: Survey of Research Methods (3 credits)
RES 501: Basic Research Statistics (3 credits)
RES 502: Intermediate Research Statistics (3 credits)
RES 505: Qualitative Research Methods (3 credits)
RES 653 Transpersonal Research (3 credits)
RES 699: Research in Complementary Medicine (3 credits)
OR: Another research preparation course selected with guidance of the senior faculty.

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Comprehensive Examination
Once you have completed the coursework elements of your degree, you will be asked to schedule the Comprehensive Examination. Your primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

Required: EXM 880: Comprehensive Examination (Required: 2 credits)
Once you have completed the coursework elements of your degree, you will be asked to schedule the Comprehensive Examination. Your primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area conduct both the written and oral components of the examination. The written portion is open book style with selected essay questions requiring creative responses that reach for the higher levels of cognition. Your answers are expected to draw from both the primary and secondary competencies of your program with proper referencing of the scholarly literature. The oral component of the examination is normally completed by telephone conference and is intended to allow detailed investigation of your written responses.

Thesis Proposal
You are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to your concept for research under the direction of your primary mentor and according to University expectations. At a minimum, your research proposal should clarify the thesis statement and methodology (including the data gathering instruments and data analysis techniques) and provide an effective overview of the scholarly literature that sets the foundation for the thesis. Your research proposal should also include a brief manuscript outline that demonstrates how you will present in written form the various elements of the research project.

Required:
RES 885: Thesis Proposal (Required: 2 credits)

You are expected to prepare a formal proposal related to your concept for research under the direction of your primary mentor and according to University expectations. At a minimum, your research proposal should clarify the thesis statement and methodology (including the data gathering instruments and data analysis techniques) and provide an effective overview of the scholarly literature that sets the foundation for the thesis. Your research proposal should also include a brief manuscript outline that demonstrates how you will present in written form the various elements of the research project.

Thesis Project
Following approval of your thesis proposal, you will begin your research project. Your thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is chosen, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be your original work and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement to the professional field.

Your thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of your thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If your thesis takes the form of a scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

Required:
RES 890: Thesis Project (Required: 4 credits)

Following approval of your thesis proposal, you will begin your research project. Your thesis may take the form of a traditional research project or it may be a major scholarly project of the type appropriate to the discipline. Whichever approach to the thesis is chosen, the resulting project must demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge in the major field of study, be your original work and represent a meaningful contribution to the betterment of the human condition or an improvement to the professional field. Your thesis research may be conducted via quantitative, qualitative, or participatory action research. The body of your thesis manuscript, structured according to a set of approved manuscript guidelines, should exceed 75 double spaced, typewritten pages. If your thesis takes the form of a scholarly project, it must follow the guidelines provided by the University for such projects.

Oral Review of Thesis
Once you have prepared the thesis manuscript, you will be asked to schedule the formal review process. Your primary mentor and a faculty member representing the secondary academic area will conduct both the formal physical review of the thesis manuscript and the oral review of thesis.

The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to your underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and your presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations.

The Oral Review of Thesis is conducted under the direction of your primary mentor with the assistance of one qualified member of the faculty. The examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of your thesis. The faculty reviewers explore with you issues related to your thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

One outcome of the thesis review process is a set of final expectations directing you through the remaining tasks for completing the thesis manuscript. Once your final manuscript is approved, you will submit the formal document to an approved bindery and later ship the bound thesis to the University for permanent archival storage.

Required:
EXM 895: Oral Review of Thesis (Required: 2 credits)

The physical review of the thesis manuscript usually takes the review committee four to six weeks. Each reviewer will prepare questions and commentary relative to your underlying review of the literature, the thesis methodology, the mechanics of your project, and your presentation of the findings, conclusions and recommendations. The Oral Review of Thesis is conducted under the direction of your primary mentor with the assistance of one qualified member of the faculty. The examination is carried out by telephone conference call and is designed to allow detailed investigation of your thesis. The faculty reviewers explore with you issues related to your thesis including methodology, review of literature and interpretation of the findings.

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PROGRAM FACULTY

Jim Morningstar, Ph.D.
Program Director

Dr. Morningstar is the founder and director of the School of Spiritual Psychology, and has been a recognized leader in the breathwork movement. After completing his doctorate in clinical psychology at Fordham University in 1972, he served as a staff psychologist and the administrator of a community mental health center. After traveling in Africa in the 1970s, he began a deep search for his own spiritual path, doing extensive personal growth work in Gestalt, bioenergetics and tai chi, living in a spiritual community, engaging in enlightenment intensives, and conducting research on levels of consciousness. Jim's books have been translated into other languages, and he presents workshops and seminars in the United States and abroad. Dr. Morningstar has authored three books and one audiotape in the fields of spiritual psychology and breathwork.

Daniel L. Huber, Ph.D.
Dan Huber grew up on the shores of Lake Michigan in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Heavily influenced by the beauty of nature around him and the communal interest in helping others, inspired by his parents, Dan developed and pursued a career in helping people. His career started as a childcare counselor at the Child Guidance Clinic in Boston, where exposure to the brightest minds in psychiatry and psychology in helping children, inspired him to enter further graduate study in psychology. His studies began at Boston University and culminated in degrees in counseling and school psychology and a doctorate in developmental psychology from University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. Along with his strong academic interest in learning ways to help others, Dan developed spiritually through meditation and shamanism. He found this to be a much broader view for understanding and helping to improve the human condition. Dan’s current work is focused on using ancient techniques of meditation and Shamanism to improve the lives of others and strengthen communities. This interest is presently being expanded into teaching, researching and infusing scientific psychology with practical spirituality.

John L. Laughlin, Ph.D.
Dr. Laughlin received his doctoral degree in Humanistic Psychology from Fairfax University, Louisiana and his MS in Clinical Social Work from Columbia University, New York. He has many years of clinical experience in individual, group, couple and family psychotherapy. Dr. Laughlin has supervised graduate students from Adelphi, Columbia, Rutgers and Fordham Universities. He is also on the faculty of Westbrook University, New Mexico. For the past ten years he has conducted his own private practice in Glen Dale, Maryland. Dr. Laughlin is a Clinical Member of AAMFT, a Board Certified Diplomate in Clinical Social Work, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Maryland, a Certified Doctoral Additions Counselor, and a Diplomate of the American Psychotherapy Association. Dr. Laughlin is an author of many scholarly articles and a recent book entitled, Reading Thomas Merton: His Life and Works.

Antonio Cardona, MPA, MA, CPM, CWDP, GCF
Mr. Cardona holds the Executive Master's in Public Administration from Rutgers University and Master of Arts in Community Counseling from The College of New Jersey. He has been actively involved in diversity and race relations, and the development of anti-discrimination programming for over 10 years. Mr. Cardona is a native speaking Spanish language communicator and has served as an EEO Investigator for the State of New Jersey, including placement within the Office of the Attorney General for assurance of compliance and diversity administration. He is a human resource professional with the New Jersey Department of Human Services and a Workforce Development Coordinator and Career Counselor. Mr. Cardona coordinates mediation scheduling and training for Union County and serves as a professional mediator with the court systems in Union and Somerset Counties. He is an Associate Professor of Psychology with Mercer County College, and an adjunct faculty member with the Human Resource Development Institute, Union County College. Mr. Cardona serves the State of New Jersey as a diversity expert, holds government certifications in EEO/AA, Diversity Programming and Training, Mediation and Employment Dispute Issues, and holds workforce development credentials including Certified Job Counselor, Training-the-Trainer, and Managing Workplace Diversity. He is an active radio and television presenter, trainer and speaker and serves on a number of state boards and community advisor boards.

Ruth Huffman-Hine, Ph.D.
Dr. Huffman Hine has spent forty years in the field of education, twenty-four of which were in designing and implementing programs in literacy, English as a Second Language and programs for high school completion. Serving as administrator of the school corporation's program, she collaborated with business and industry to design programs of instruction to encourage workers to be successful in their jobs. Dr. Huffman Hine is zealous in her desire to inspire adults to achieve an education so they can be successful in their life's pursuits. She holds a lifetime teaching certificate with a BS in Education from Butler University, Indianapolis; MA in Education from Indiana University, Bloomington; and a doctoral degree in Educational Administration from Greenwich University. She has served in leadership roles in adult education professional organizations, and has provided direction in training volunteer tutors. Dr. Huffman Hine is presently doing research for a publication in adult education.

Juanita J. Rinas, MA, LPC
Prof. Rinas is currently finishing a Ph.D. at the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology. She has worked in the mental health and substance abuse fields for several years, and continues to be a licensed counselor in private practice. Ms. Rinas has considerable experience in qualitative methods of research. Her doctoral research uses blended methods of qualitative inquiry to better understand complex relationships between people involved in selected activities, focusing on the psychological and ecological implications of different forms of communication. Ms. Rinas has research interests in consciousness, social change, human-nature interconnections and psychological/ social interdependencies within diverse cultures and societies. Her interests have been fueled by work experiences in job coaching, human resource administration, case management, emergency mental health and crisis-management services and Juanita’s personal journey from homelessness to higher education in Western society. She has worked with diverse client populations and belief systems. Ms. Rinas is an active advocate for cultural preservation, multicultural communication, environmental preservation, ecological sustainability, social justice and reform. She is proactive regarding the creation of positive, creative, and sustainable work and living environments, applied education, training, and research. She values indigenous rights, spiritual freedom, women’s rights, and integral, life-long learning. Ms. Rinas has a published poem: Seamless Flowing. She writes for a local, independent newspaper and has a column, Beyond the Heard Mentality, which promotes self-care, connections with community, environment, mental health, social issues, and community services.

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